Using Console Mode on a Honeywell Home Tuxedo

Using Console Mode on a Honeywell Home Tuxedo


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Description

In this video, Michael from Alarm Grid demonstrates Console Mode on a Honeywell Home Tuxedo Keypad. Console Mode allows a Tuxedo Keypad to emulate an Alphanumeric Keypad, such as a Honeywell 6160. This is necessary for programming a Honeywell VISTA System. Once the Tuxedo is in its Console Mode, you can use the Tuxedo in the exact same way that you would use an Alphanumeric Keypad. There will be a numeric keypad on the screen for this purpose. By using this keypad, you can access Installer Programming and all relevant programming fields. The Tuxedo will automatically reboot once you exit out of Installer Programming. Remember to always use the [*99] programming option to exit. This is important, as it will prevent you from being locked out.

Thanks to Console Mode, a Tuxedo Keypad can do virtually everything that a standard Alphanumeric Keypad can accomplish. The only notable thing that the Tuxedo cannot do is perform the backdoor method to get into programming when you are locked out. The reason why this cannot be done on a Tuxedo is because you cannot load Console Mode quickly enough after the panel has booted up. For that reason, it is still a good idea to keep a Honeywell 6160 or Honeywell 6150 on-hand, even if the Tuxedo has become your primary system keypad. Although you do not need to provide a code to access Console Mode, you will likely need to use either the Installer Code or the Master Code when making changes within Console Mode. Most system programming functions and commands will require you to provide some code to verify authentication. However, the Tuxedo Console Mode can still be very useful for zone programming, adding and removing user codes, and performing other system programming commands. This makes Console Mode a very important tool for anyone who uses the Tuxedo as the main system keypad.

https://www.alarmgrid.com/faq/how-do-i-get-into-console-mode-on-a-resideo-tuxedo

http://alrm.gd/get-monitored


Transcript

Hi, DIYers. This is Michael from Alarm Grid. And today, I'm going to be showing you how to access Console Mode for Honeywell Home Tuxedo keypad. Just to get right into it. So we're at the Tuxedo, Security, and we'll choose the More choices icon on the right. And then, there's Console Mode. And now, we're in Console Mode. And now, it will kick us out of Console Mode in a second, because I'm not going to do anything on the keypad for a minute or so. But just to tell you what console mode is. It's basically, Programming Mode for your Tuxedo keypad. It allows the Tuxedo to mimic an alphanumeric keypad, like the 6160RF right here. So it has the same layouts. You see the numeric keypad on the screen? It says, disarmed, ready to arm and this one also says disarmed, ready to arm, because these are both connected with the same VISTA system, right down here. So you'll basically, be using your Tuxedo as an alphanumeric keypad, which is needed for programming the system, changing various settings. You can do various things in Console Mode that you can't do through the Tuxedo menus. So it's a great way to have your keypad, your Tuxedo keypad, act as an alphanumeric keypad. Don't confuse it with a Fixed English keypad like the 6150. If you try to program your VISTA system using a Fixed English keypad, you'll be operating blindly, and you are prone to making a mistake. So we really only recommend programming using a traditional alphanumeric keypad or a Tuxedo in Console Mode. So those are both good options. The one thing you can't do on a Tuxedo, you won't be able to load Console Mode quickly enough to perform the backdoor method. So you can't get into Programming, if you're locked out using a Tuxedo. That's why it's a good idea to keep a 6150 or a 6160 around. Just in case you get locked out of Programming. But I will show zone programming in Console Mode, just to show something often in it. Again, let's use Security, More Choices, the three little buttons there, three dots, I guess, and then, Console Mode. And now, so let's demonstrate Console Mode. So let's get into Programming. We're going to enter in our installer code, which is always at the default, 4, 1, 1, 2, and then, we'll enter in 8, 0, 0. And then, it's going to have a little bit of a lag compared to the alphanumeric keypad, but you see they both say, installer code 20. Like I said, they're both connected with the same VISTA system. So they're doing the same thing there. So we'll get into Zone Programming, so Star 56. And now, we're going to use 0, when it asks us to set to confirm, we'll choose no. This is just basic zone programming. I won't go too in-depth in this, but I will enter in zone 0, 9. To work on that zone, we'll choose Star. And then, it's going to give us a little summary screen there. We'll just continue and be on that, pressing Star. For the zone type, we'll choose 0, 1, for entry exit 1. That's the zone type we'll use. We'll choose Star. And we'll set it to partition 1, Star. And we'll press Star to continue past the report code. And for the input type for our transmission, we're fine with three, so we'll press Star. And now, it's asking us to learn in the serial number. We have a Honeywell 5816, door and window contact sensor. It's going to program using loop number 2 for the read switch, but we'll separate this. And there we go, we got it to go through. So you see, we have the serial number and the loop number displayed on the screen. We're fine with the loop number 2, because we're using the read switch, and that's the serial number for the sensor. So we'll press Star. And you see, this is just like using an alphanumeric keypad for programming. So press Star again, at the summary screen. And we're not going to program the Alpha today, that's basically the zone descriptor for the sensor. You want to give it a name, you can do that, but we're fine with 0. So we'll just press Star. And now, we're back at the screen here. I didn't want to go to the next one. So we'll just press 0, 0 to quit Zone Programming. And it's asking us the field. And we'll enter Star. And then, we'll enter 99. And once I do this, it is going to reboot the keypad, because whenever you exit Programming in Console Mode, or even on the regular keypad, even if you were using this and then, this was in Console Mode, just because you put it into Console Mode and then, switched over to this. I could actually swap between these two while programming. You'd see when I exit Programming, it does reboot the Tuxedo, that's normal. So when it reloads it will have the settings applied. But that's basically, what Console Mode is. It's just basically, a way to program your system, change various settings. You get into all the programming fields and do whatever you need to. Just like if you were using an alphanumeric keypad. That's what the Console Mode is. So we'll let this boot up for a second here. And then, I'll show you that the zone was programmed, just to give you a quick little demonstration of what we did in programming, that our changes were applied. They were automatically saved when we did the star 99 to exit. Remember, to always use star 99 to exit, don't use a different way to exit, or you will become locked out of Programming, and that's bad. But our tuxedo is back at the screen here. And so we have door and window contact sensor, our 5816. And so the magnet would be placed on the moving portion of the door and window. And we separated it from the sensor, the door is opens. And you see, we get the fault on the system, because we do have it properly programmed as an Entry/Exit zone. The system is not really going to do anything with it in a disarmed state, but if it were armed, we would have to disarm within our entry delay period or else an alarm would occur on the system. But again, the door is closed right now. And we open the door. And we get the fault on the system. Just to show you that we did do something in Console Mode. So that's how you access Console Mode on a Honeywell Home Tuxedo keypad. You choose security, use the More Choices, and then, you choose Console Mode and then, you're in Console Mode. And you can do whatever you need to in Console Mode there. So if you have any questions about Console Mode, or the Honeywell Home's Tuxedo keypad, the Residio Tuxedo keypad, the Honeywell VISTA systems, or alarm monitoring services, send an email to support@alarmgrid.com. If you find this video helpful, make sure to give it a thumbs up below, to like the video. And remember to subscribe to our channel for updates on future videos. We hope you enjoyed the video. Thank you.


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