Honeywell VISTA 21iP: Swap-out with an APEX Destiny Security System

Sterling swaps a brand new VISTA 21iP panel in place of an old APEX Destiny Security system. The swap-out is seamless and simple to perform.

You can't get Total Connect without signing up through an AlarmNet provider. We offer a standalone Total Connect plan that is only $10/month if you are using the VISTA-21iP ($20/month if you want the VISTA-GSM4G involved as well) and you can sign up online at https://www.alarmgrid.com/monitoring. There is no contract required and no activation fee.
Self Monitored, no monitoring plan
What is the next step after you install the Radio? how do you make it talk to Total Connect?

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Description

Sterling swaps a brand new VISTA 21iP panel in place of an old APEX Destiny Security system. The swap-out is seamless and simple to perform.


Transcript

Hi DIYers, Sterling from Alarm Grade here and today we're going to show you
how to do a control panel swap out. We have an older Destiny panel from
Apex. Fourteen zone panel. There are some zone expansion modules here. And
he's got it connected to an older uplink GSM unit. What we're going to do
is replace with a Honeywell Vista 21iP, which is a Honeywell 8/8 zone panel
that has a built-in internet communicator.

We're also going to add a Vista/GSMV 4G, which is a cellular snap-on card
for the Vista 21iP that will replace the existing uplink. The uplink's a
decent unit. You can get alarm signals without having a phone line but it
doesn't support some of the more advanced interactive options that the
Honeywell total connect service provides like the ability to arm and disarm
from your smart phone or from your computer and the ability to get instant
emails and text messages from the system.

So it's going to be a nice upgrade. This panel is quite old. It's got two
keypads connected. When the door and windows are opening, the keypads do
give voice enunciation so we're going to replace those keypads with a 61/60
V which is an alphanumeric programming keypad with voice enunciation. And
we're also going to add a Tuxedo Touch Wi-Fi for the front door keypad.
Beautiful graphic touch screen that has a built in z-wave home automation
controller so that the system will not only be a security system now but a
complete smart home home-automation and security system.

So, we've got our panel door off. We have already labeled all of our wires
that are connected now. So, we've got our four phone wires which we've got
labeled but we're not going to use anymore because we're doing internet and
GSM. We have our speaker wire, our keypad wires, our transformer which is
this plug-in transformer right here, powers the system. And then we have
all of our zones labeled down these vertical zone terminals so we know
exactly what this whole mess of wires are, so that we can remove all the
wires from the panel, take the panel and the board down, and then add in
our new Honeywell Vista 21iP.

So, what I'm going to do now that everything's labeled is go ahead and
power everything down. You should never remove any wires when the system is
powered up. So, to remove power we have a backup battery. It's a sealed
lead acid 12 volt 7 ampere battery. You've got a black and a red spade
connector which connected to the charging circuit of the control panel. You
simply wiggle these off. We've removed our backup battery which protects
when there's a power outage and the only thing powering the system now is
this plug-in transformer here so we're going to...oh, screwed in, so we're
going to remove this screw.

A lot of times, the installer will screw in a transformer so it doesn't get
inadvertently get unplugged and kill power to the panel. So, we remove this
screw from the face plate. And then now we can unplug the battery. You saw
the lights that were lit up are no longer lit up. The system is powered
down. And we're free to go ahead and remove all of the wires. You can see
on this face plate here, you've got some discoloration. That's because
these transformers do get hot over time. I'm just going to set that aside
for now, along with the face plate.

So now we have our small flat head screwdriver, and we're going to go ahead
with the panel powered down and remove all of our existing wires that we've
already tagged. It's very important to tag the wires, because if you don't
and you just start to remove wires, obviously not every board has the same
screw terminals in the same positions and once you've just got a mess of
wires landed over here it's going to be very hard to determine what's your
zone, what's your power.

So, it's very important with any control panel swap out, the first thing
you should do is label every wire. Typically, your panel that you're
removing the wires from will have each terminal screw labeled so, to give
you an idea of what every wire is. There, we got our [Toco] wires, removed
our telephone wires. Now we're going to do our keypads.

The Destiny panel uses a four-wire connection for the keypads whereas the
Honeywell system, we use a four-wire connection so once we start adding
things back that's where we'll deal with just using four of the six
terminals or wires that are there now. But for now, since we're just
removing everything, we're just taking them all. We also have our speakers
connected, again, because the Destiny keypads do have that voice
enunciation that's what the other two extra wires are for. So these screw
terminals are labeled "speakers" and it's the sirens as well as the two
speakers for the keypad.

Now we've got our keypad bus, which is our four wires here, similar to our
Honeywell system. Two for power and two for data. Remove all of those.
Okay, now we've got our keypads and our siren removed. These next two are
for the AC power, or the transformer that we unplugged. Take those off. Now
his uplink unit was getting power from the board as well as this auxiliary
power supply, so he had some relays set up over here, which is going to be
irrelevant on the Vista. So we're just going to remove all of these wires
and they're actually not even going to get landed back onto the new board.
Take that off. Pull this out.

And now we have this beautiful nest of wires for the zones. Go ahead and
remove all of these. Each zone is going to get two wires. This system does
not have any four-wire smoke detectors or glass-break detectors or smoke
detectors. Everything is just simple door and window contacts, two wire
connections for each zone. And like I said before, this panel is broken out
into fourteen different zones. This is a split-level, or a two-level house,
upstairs and downstairs, so it's a mixture of windows and doors in the
bedrooms and the front door, garage door areas. And we'll go through each
of those zones as we add them back. Some of these zones are spliced in,
couple of different loops are spliced together, which is the cause of some
of this nest and we've got them tagged so we can see what's connected.
We'll go through and point out each of that as we add the new zones back to
the Vista.

This control panel box is, unfortunately, not exactly the same size as the
Honeywell panel. So we are going to have to deal with taking the entire can
down along with the board to get the new can in. Obviously if you do a like-
for-like swap out, an older Honeywell to a newer Honeywell, more likely you
can use the existing board, but not the case this time. So, we've now got
all of our wires removed. This is just a jumper wire. So this control panel
is totally not connected to anything and we can go ahead and take it out of
the wall.

So, the control panel box has four Phillips head screwdrivers in the
corner. That's keep the metal control panel or can attached to the wall.
So, we're just going to take our Phillips head screwdriver, remove these
four. And actually, if we just loosen them up a little bit, the way that
this board is, has it's screw holes is we can just slide it up and out. Now
that we have our control panel loose and ready to come out, we just want
one last wire here connecting this power supply to our uplink so we want to
remove that. We're not using the uplink anymore, so this can come out.

Same thing, this transformer is screwed into the wall plate so it doesn't
get removed inadvertently. Simply remove the screw, unplug the transformer
and actually on the back of here, you've got two screw terminals connecting
the red and black, positive and negative AC power to the uplink. We remove
that, and that wire's ready to come out. We can speed it through here. And
so our uplink is now completely removed from our panel.

And we're going to be careful now to take this board out. We've got all
these wires and they're kind of hard to see, but we've got some cut outs on
the back of the panel. So we have to be careful as we pull all of this out.
We want to feed the wires through the holes in the back, just kind of going
wire by wire here. Got our RJ31X jack for the phone connection causing us a
problem here so just going to remove that as well. An RJ31X jack allows you
to feed your telephone wire from your phone block into your panel and gives
you an easy way, or a homeowner an easy way, to remove the security system
from the panel or from the house phone line in case the system is ever
causing you an issue where you can't use the phone line.

So the panel is locked up or there's some sort of communication issue
that's causing an issue or causing a problem with your home phone, the
RJ31X allows you to simply unhook a wire and easily allow the homeowner to
get their phone line back. Obviously, with this installation using internet
and cellular connections, we do not have to worry about any phone
connections. So, we're just going to remove all these wires so we can get
our panel box off. Now got it loose, pull this wire through and through the
back. Okay.

Now we've got to get all our zone wiring, and this is where it's going to
get a little tricky. We do have all of our resistors wired to our zones and
we kind of don't want to damage that or have any issues there once we get
it back, so we're going to do our best to crimp all of these together in a
nice bundle so that we can feed it through this hole in the panel. And of
course we're getting a little bunched up here. Almost got it.

Okay. So, our panel is now completely disconnected off the wall. And you
can see our cutout from our original installation years ago, where our
original alarm guy wired all of the wires to this location. So, we are now
ready to move over and start looking at what we're going to do to get our
Vista 21iP panel ready to be installed in this location.

We're going to have to move these screw holes down a little bit because our
21iP has an antenna that's going to stick off the top. We need a little
more clearance here, so we're going to have to come back and drill some new
holes and get our new panel in. We'll be back in just a moment to finish
up.

Okay. Now we have our new Vista, brand new Honeywell Vista 21IP panel. We
have fished our zone wires through this knock out in the can and we've got
out siren, transformer, and keypad wires coming out of this hole. Both of
these knockouts are in there for this very purpose, so you just kind of
knock them out and you've got your hole. We've got our hole in the wall,
with all our wires coming through. So we are now going to mount this new
can, which is a slightly different size than our old can. Obviously, we
want to make sure that the hole where the wires are coming through is going
to be behind these holes, so we don't pinch these wires. We've got a level,
make sure we do a nice clean installation here, and we're going to mark our
four holes.

Alright, I've got our hole marked. Hold the panel down. We're going to have
to just feed the wires back through the hole. When we drill, we've got
screws and wall anchors. And we've got our electric drill. So first, drill
our four holes, making sure they're big enough for our anchors. We have a
hammer to hammer in our anchors. And our last one. And we are now ready to
mount the panel.

Fish our wires back through the knockouts, starting with our whole zone
bundle here. Feed the wires through the hole. We've got our transformer,
siren, and keypad wires through the other hole. Pull them through, and line
up with our holes. Get our screws, and we'll replace our drill bit with a
Phillips head screw bit to get this in nice and easy.

Good thing we've got plenty of screws. Like I said, we've got plenty of
screws. Awkward to do up on a ladder here, but I'm getting there, just
enough to hold it. Okay, we've got our two up top. Finalize our last one.
Now our can, nice and secure to the wall. So, the next step in the process
is to connect everything. So what we want to do first is our keypads.

We've got our keypads twisted together here, and as we said before, the
Destiny keypads actually have six wires, unlike the Honeywell keypads that
use just four. So there are two for a speaker and then four for the data
and the power to the keypads. So we've got our six pairs here, and we're
going to want to see where these are terminated at the keypad to make sure
we land them in the right spot on the board.

Once we twist all our pairs, then we can land them to the ECP terminals,
terminals four through seven on the Vista 21IP board. You can see on the
21IP we've got all our terminal screws along the bottom. They are all
labeled. The first two are AC, we've got bell for the siren, along with
ground, auxiliary, green and yellow for the data, for the ECP, which is
these four through seven, and then it goes through the zone connections.

We have 14 zones from our old destiny panel. Our 21IP is an eight zone
panel, but what we're going to do is use some zone doubling to make use of
the existing eight and turn them into a total of 15 possible zones so that
we do not have to use any zone expansion boards or anything like that.

We're going to have to use new resistors. The resistor value on the old
Destiny board is a different value than what the 21IP needs. The 21IP needs
2K resistors, run in series for each zone. So we're going to have to take
all the resistors off, and connect them with zone-doubling resistors that
comes with the 21IP, we'll show that in a minute.

So we've got our brand-new Honeywell transformer. We've got our black and
our red AC transformer leads. Just simply hook them a little bit and get it
nice and tight with the screw. With these transformers polarity does not
matter, so red and black can go to either terminal. You just want to make
sure obviously that it's one to one. And then when your screw is tightened
down you've got good connection. Nice and tight, and we now have our AC
power red and black connected.

We do not want to plug it in quite yet. You always want to make your
connections at the panel before you actually are going to plug the
transformer in, otherwise you're dealing with hot live wires over here and
you may do damage to the board. So we've got our label showing transformer,
black and the red that match. Again, polarity does not matter. So you've
got our first two terminals labeled AC on our 21IP.

Again we got stranded wire here so we just want to twist these down so it's
a nice clean connection into the screw terminals. Because the transformer's
not plugged in, these wires are not live. Good to go. You unscrew the
terminal, gives you a little bit of room underneath the metal bracket in
the back of the terminal, and then you just screw it down for a nice tight
connection. We've got our black negative connected, and now our positive.

So now we have our AC power wire good to go. Next one we're going to
connect is our siren wire. For our siren, we also have black and red, this
time polarity does matter, though. Twist our ends, and so we've got
terminal screw three as bell. Four is ground, ground is our negative power
terminal and this bell is our positive siren output. When the alarm kicks
on, or goes into alarm mode, gives voltage to this terminal which drives
the power out to the siren so they can make the noise, hopefully scare away
the intruder, let everyone know that there's been a break in.

So this is obviously for a wired siren. He's got an existing wired siren.
One upstairs and then with the old Destiny, because they keypads were a
siren themselves that was the only siren he really had, was the one
upstairs. His other two keypads were acting as sirens at the front door and
the garage door, the other two points of entry into the house. So he had
enunciation upstairs in the master bedroom and then you had your front door
garage door, so we're really just right now connecting in the siren that's
upstairs.

Once we get everything connected if that siren is not going to be loud
enough, we can always add in an extra wired siren. A 712, or a 702 is a
nice, loud siren. Those are Honeywell model numbers. Otherwise we can go
ahead and add a wireless siren might make it a little bit easier. 5800
wave, that one just simply plugs into an outlet. But we're going to deal
with getting all the zones connected, keypads and then we'll look at that
later.

So now that we have our AC power, and our siren connected. The next thing
we want to do is our keypads. Because the Apex keypads, the Destiny keypads
have six connectors, we want to go take a look at our keypads and identify
which wires these are so we know which to land to for power and data for
the 21IP. We'll take a short break here. We'll go over and take a look at
the keypads and we'll be right back.

We've got our wires written down, which wire is going to what at the panel.
So I know that my blue wire, connected to my red here, is coming from the
negative ECP terminal, or the ground of the keypad bus on the panel. I know
that my green, which is connected to purple is to my ECP positive terminal.
Or my aux power, so this is plus and minus for power to the keypad, and on
the keypad itself you've got this strip of four screw terminals. You've got
negative and plus in the middle, and you've got your data, you've got your
green and your yellow on the outside.

So again we've got blue going to ground, green going to aux power. We've
got our green and white which is to purple coming from our green. So that's
going to go to our G. They conveniently labeled the data as green and
yellow. And then finally I've got my yellow wire. I do my best to keep it
easy, so yellow connected to white is going to go to yellow.

So next step in the process is to connect everything. So what we want to do
first is our keypads. We've got our keypads twisted together here, and as
we said before, the Destiny keypads actually have six wires, unlike the
Honeywell keypads that use just four. So there are two for a speaker and
then four for the data and the power to the keypads. So we've got our six
pairs here, and we're going to want to see where these are terminated at
the keypad to make sure we land them at the right spot on the board. Once
we twist all our pairs, then we can land them to the ECP terminals,
terminals four through seven on the VISTA-21iP board. You can see on the
21iP, we've got all our terminal screws along the bottom. They are all
labeled. First two are AC, we've got bell for the siren, along way ground,
auxiliary, green and yellow for the data for the ECP, which is these four
through seven, and then it goes through the zone connections.

We have fourteen zones from our old Destiny panel. Our 21iP is an eight-
zone panel, but what we're going to do is use some zone doubling to make
use of the existing eight and turn them into a total of fifteen possible
zones so that we do not have to use any zone expansion boards or anything
like that. We're going to have to use new resistors. The resistor value on
the old Destiny board is a different value than what the 21iP needs. 21iP
needs 2K resistors running series for each zone. So we're going to have to
take all the resistors off and connect them with the zone doubling
resistors that comes with the 21iP. We'll show that in a minute.

So we've got our brand new Honeywell transformer. We've got our black and
our red AC transformer leads, just simply hook them a little bit, and get
it nice and tight with a screw. With these transformers, polarity does not
matter. So red and black can go to either terminal. You just want to make
sure, obviously, that's one-to-one, and that when your screw is tightened
down that you've got good connection. Nice and tight, and we now have our
AC power, red and black connected. We do not want to plug it in quite yet.
You always want to make your connections at the panel before you actually
are going to plug the transformer in. Otherwise, you're dealing with hot,
live wires over here, and you may do damage to the board.

So we've got our label showing transformer, this black and the red that
match, again, polarity does not matter. So you've got our first two
terminals labeled AC on our 21iP. Again, we've got stranded wire here, so
we just want to twist these down so it's a nice clean connection into the
screw terminals. Because the transformer's not plugged in, these wires are
not live. Good to go. You unscrew the terminal, gives you a little bit of
room underneath the metal bracket in the back of terminal, and then you
just screw it down for a nice, tight connect. We got our black negative
connected and now our positive. So now we have our AC power wire good to
go.

Next one we're going to connect is our siren wire. For our siren, we also
have black and red. This time polarity does matter, though. Twist our ends.
And so we've got terminal screw three is bell, four is ground. Ground is
our negative power terminal, and this bell is our positive siren output.
When the alarm kicks on or goes into alarm mode, it gives voltage to this
terminal, which drives the power out to the siren so that they can make the
noise, hopefully, scare away the intruder, let everyone know that there's
been a break in. So this is, obviously, for a wired siren. He's got an
existing wired siren. One upstairs and then, with the old Destiny because
the keypads were a siren themselves, that was the only siren he really had
was the one upstairs. His other two keypads were acting as sirens at the
front door and the garage door, the other two points of entry to the house.
So he had enunciation upstairs in the master bedroom and then you had your
front door garage door.

So we're really just, right now, connecting in the siren that's upstairs.
Once we get everything connected, if that siren is not going to be loud
enough, we can always add in an extra wired siren. A 712 or a 702 are nice,
loud sirens. Those are Honeywell model numbers. Otherwise, we can go ahead
and add a wireless siren, might make it a little bit easier, 5800 Wave,
that one simply plugs into an outlet. But we're going to deal with getting
all the zones connected, keypads in, and then we'll look at that later.

So now that we have our AC power and our siren connected, the next thing we
want to do is our keypads. Because the Apex keypads, the Destiny keypads,
have six connectors we want to go take a look at our keypads and identify
which wires these are so we know which to land to for power and data on the
21kP. So we'll take a short break here. We'll go over and take a look at
the keypads, and we'll be right back.

We've got our wires. We have written down which wire is going to what at
the panel. So I know that my blue wire connected to my red here is coming
from the negative ECP terminal, or the ground of the keypad box on the
panel. I know that my green, which is connected to purple is to my ECP
positive terminal, or my aux power. So this is plus and minus for power to
the keypad, and on the keypad itself, you've got the strip of four screw
terminals. You've got negative and plus in the middle, and you've got your
data, you've got your green and your yellow on the outside. So, again, we
got blue going to ground, green going to aux power. We've got our green and
white, which is to purple, coming from our green, so that's going to go to
our G. They conveniently labeled the data as green and yellow. And finally,
I've got my yellow wire, I did my best to keep it easy, so yellow connected
to white is going to go to yellow.

Now that we have our AC power and our siren connected, we're going to land
our keypad wires. The Destiny keypads as we said before have six
connectors. Four are power and data, two for power, two for data. And then
they have an extra two, because the Destiny keypads have built-in speakers.
The Honeywell keypads that we're going to be putting in, a 6160 V, and a
Tuxedo Touch WiFi are simple four wire connections. So, we're going to take
two of our connections on here. I'm going to choose the blue and white and
yellow white, and we're just going to wrap these down. We're not going to
use that. And we're going to run our two keypads here in parallel on our
ECP terminal, four, five, six and seven. So, on the board here we've got
ground, aux power, green and yellow, which is power or negative power,
positive power, data in, data out. So, when you run in parallel, that's a
home run from each keypad. And we just want to make sure that when we go
back over to our keypads, that we know which wire we've connected to which
terminal. So, once we've made our connections, we're just going to label on
a piece of paper, to make sure that we connect the right wires onto our
keypads once we get to that part. So, for now, I'm just going to choose two
colors. We're going to go blue.

Here are our two blues. We're going to make these the ground connection,
negative power. So, these get landed on the same screw as our siren.

Screw it down nice and tight. good connection. And we're going to go and
choose our next color, green. Again, the color doesn't really matter for
what we're doing, since it's an existing run. The important part will be to
make sure that we're landing the proper colors on the actual keypad, once
we get to there. So, we're going to go green, to power positive or aux
power.

Nice and tight. We're going to go and use yellow for our... Well, we could
have been smart and used green on green and yellow on yellow. What we'll do
is, we'll go yellow to yellow. We already landed the green, so we can use
our white and green to go with the actual green terminal. We've got yellow
connected, and so we're left with our green and our white. Going to land
that under green, nice and tight, and we now made our two keypad
connections, which used to be six wires.

And now for the Honeywell, we've got our simple four wire. So, we've got
our transformer, siren, two keypads connected. These are battery charging
circuits. We're going to leave that off. We're going to deal with power in
the transformer later. We're going to start to land all of these zone
terminals. The VISTA 21IP comes programmed with zones one through eight
enabled. Zone one is set up as a fire zone by default. Two wired smoke
detectors attached to this first terminal. get an auto power reset when you
disarm this system.

So, if you are going to have wired smokes, you should always use terminals
Z plus one or Z1 plus and Z1 negative. For us, we don't have any smoke
detectors tied in to this system, so we're going to use that as a simple
door or window zone. And, like I said from before, because we've got 14
zones here and our panel is only eight zones, we're going to use what's
called "zone doubling." You can't zone double zone one, because that's the
fire zone, but we can zone double zones two through eight to get a total of
15 zones from our base panel.

And that's what we're going to do to break out these zones. Once we have it
connected, we'll have everything landed and we'll have two of these
individual zones landed on two, three, four, five, six, seven and eight,
and we'll have a single zone on zone one. We'll have everything wired up at
that point.

We can go deal with our keypads, add in our GSM card which gets snapped in
here, go on power, and then we'll move over to start addressing the keypads
and finalizing the installation. So, the hard part will be navigating all
of this. Likely we've got it labeled, so hopefully we can sort this out,
and it won't be too bad. So, we're going to try to find to keep things
neat, our front door. And we do have a list of our zones from originally,
so zone one is the front door.

Try to keep these wires as neat as possible. You have zone 14 right here,
working down. Set aside zone 14. We've got zone 13, set that one aside.
We've got the back window, this is zone four. So some of these zones, when
they're just a single loop, like if it's coming just from one door, you
would just have a two conductor wire similar to this. You'd have your two
conductor, your black and your red. Other zones, when it's multiple windows
tied to one loop, or one zone, it will look like this. You'll have...let's
see... so, this one is labeled back window, zone four. And you can see in
our house we have three windows that are in the back window zone.

So, you can see that there's...let's see, one, two, three, four actual
connections. And they're run in series, so normally you can run them in
series out in the field, or you can take each individual home run back to
the panel, and run them in series here. So, you get your black and your
red, you've got your red going to your black. Again, from here, you've got
a red to black. Red to black. And then we're left with a red and a black to
land as our zone. So, this is our entire back window loop made up of four
different individual openings out in the field. So, that's just to
demonstrate a way to do a quick series run right at the panel.

So again, we'll set this aside for now. That's zone four. This one is zone
two, front window right. There are three windows in that area, so that's,
again, a three loop connection tied together. Here, we've got a sliding
door, and that's two different sliders. that's connected. We've got zone
six, bathroom back. This is zone ten. This is zone seven. I'm trying to
isolate down to zone one here. We've got zone 12, front door. I believe
we've found it. Oh, no. French door, zone four. Let's see. Here we go.
Here's our zone one. So again, we've got simple connector, door window
sensor on our front door. We've got a black and a red coming from the zone.
Our negative has our resistor and again, the value of the resistor on the
old [Vesany] board is not the same resistor.

So, this is the most common issue that people run into when they do a panel
swap out, is matching the resistor value. So, a VISTA 21IP board needs a 2k
resistor when you're doing normal connections here. Zone doubling uses a
little different value. We'll talk about it in a second. But we're going to
need for this zone one, a 2k resistor to land it to these terminals. So,
I'm going to give you my resistors. We'll be right back, and we can start
to land all of these zones. So, we are now going to add zone two. We've
isolated our zone two, here. It is three separate windows in the front of
the house. Three separate loops run in series, here at the panel. You can
see they've got the dolphin connectors which are the connectors, which are
the connectors I mentioned earlier, connecting in series here. And we've
got our black, our red. I've cut off the resistor, and now we're just going
to splice.

Splice our wire here to our resistor. And this time, because this is going
to be a zone doubled one, we're going to use our zone doubling kit. Open up
our baggy here, and you can see, right on the bag, the reference that the
3k is orange, black, red, gold, and that the six.2k is blue, red, red,
gold. So, when you open this, there are two sets of eight resistors, and
very important to match the colors. Keep this as a handy reminder for which
one is which. And always the low side of the zone, so again, we're zone
doubling. We're going to use our two zone terminals for zone two, ground
and Z2, is going to be both zone two and it's also going to be zone nine.

So we've got our two sets of resistors here. And we've got our legend here
to show us which is which.

The important thing to note when you're doing your zone doubling is the
3K's, the ones with orange, are going to go with the low side of the zone,
or the lower number of the zone, and the other ones for the higher number.

So the way you do zone doubling. You're going to take two different zones
and land them on one set of terminals. So ground and Z2.

And the way it works is that your zone two will also be your zone ten. And
your different value resistor will let you know which device is actually
going off.

So I'm going to take one of my 3K resistors. Since we're doing our zone
two, we'll go with the lower value resistor. I'm going to take my little
connector piece, and we're going to go to the low part of the zone, connect
it to the resistor, clamp it down.

So we've got our connection. And always resistor to the low side of the
zone. Or label GND here.

And then our high side is going to go to Z2. So we've got our zone two
connected.

We're ready to do zone three, which on our list was back windows. So we've
got our zone three. We cut off our old resistor. Connect to our smaller 3K
resistor. To our low side. We've got our connector splice. Matching our
black wire or low side of the zone to the resistor. Clamp it down. And
we're going to connect this to zone three. We can clean these wires up and
hold on to our tools.

So we're going to land on zone three. Zone three actually shares a common
or low side with zone four, so we have a GND that we're going to land our
resistor. Then our high side of our zone, we're going to connect to zone
three. And we've got zone three connected.

Zone four is our French Doors. I want you all to find that one. There we
go.

And again, snipping off our old resistor. We've got to strip our wire a
little bit. With it stripped, make our connector to our resistor. Again,
smaller 3K value resistor connected to our low side of the zone or our
black wire. We'll connect this here. Crimp it down, makes our connection
nice and tight. And we're going to land this to zone four. Feed it up and
under, and since zone four is a shared common with zone three, we're going
to use this same terminal that we've got zone three connected on. Feed the
wire up and in. Let's see here. There we go. We've got both our commons for
zone three and zone four. And then we're landing zone four to the screw
terminal label Z4. Nice and tight. Good to go.

Zone five is our sliding door. And we actually had a sliding door upstairs
and a sliding door downstairs. Our old panel did not designate one from the
other with their zone descriptions so we want to make sure. This is our
zone nine sliding door. It's not the one we want. We want our downstairs
slider which is zone five, which is right here.

It's a double slider, so there's two loops in series. And here we go. We're
going to snip off our old resistor. And strip our wire. This wire does not
want to strip very well. Let's see if we can get this sheath off. Okay.
Take our 3K resistor, quickly using up our eight here. Again, low side with
the resistor. Crimp it down. Got our connection and we've got our two sides
of the door connected in series here. We're going to put our zone five low
side to GND in between zone five, zone six. It's going to share a common
just like three and four did. We're going to take our zone five, land it on
the terminal labeled Z5. And good to go on zone five.

All right, zone six. We have back bathroom, which is our downstairs
bathroom door leading out to the outside. They happened to have run,
interestingly enough, their resistor on their red wire for their old job,
which really doesn't matter. The color is not important. It's more
important to have the resistor on the proper terminal that you're landing
into. So we're just going to strip off this red sheath here. And to keep
things consist, we're going to use the black side with our 3K resistor. We
have not used any of our high zones yet. We're still on our bottom half of
our zone doubling. Not until we get up to zone ten will we start into the
zone doubling. So we've got our black and our resistor. Press down, nice
and tight. I'm going to feed this through our mess of wires and we've got
our zone six. So again, we're sharing a common here with zone five, so
you'll have two resistors landed under there just like we did with three
and four, five and six share a common. Wire it in. And then zone six. Zone
six is done.

All right, zone seven. And we have... Actually, that last one, I can't read
my writing. That was the back bedroom. So now we're going to do our
bathroom downstairs, or bathroom bottom. Zone seven. Nope. I take it back.
I was right in original time. That was our bathroom. So now we have our
zone seven, which is our downstairs bedroom. They've gone back to using the
resistor on the black side. Snip off the old resistor. Strip the wire. Get
our connector to our resistor. Down to our last two resistors here for our
low 3K bottom half of our zone doubling. Slide in the black wire with the
resistor. Crimp down. Nice, tight connection and we're going to land for
zone seven. Of course fish this through, and we're going to go Z7 is going
to get our high wire, our red wire, and then our GND, or rather, our low
side is going to go to our GND, which is another shared terminal, zone
eight. And we've got zone seven. Okay.

With zone seven up, we're left with zone eight, which is our last bottom-
half one. That's our garage door. See if we can locate that one. I think
it's this one here. Zone eight. Yep.

Cut off our resistor. Splice our wire. Connect our resistor to our low
side. And this is our last 3K resistor. All the rest of our resistors,
we're going to us our 6.2's for the top half of our zone doubling, so we're
essentially halfway there. Get this connected in. Crimp down. And connect
it, sharing our ground with our previous zone seven. Feed this up and
under, and we're going to land our resistor, shared along with that one.
Nice and tight, and then zone eight, going to there.

So now we've got our zones one through eight and we are left with six more
zones.

===================6.2k resistor video transcript missing=================
So in my haste to connect these, because zone one doesn't share because
it's set up as a fire, you can't double zone one, I forgot a zone nine,
which would have been shared with one. So we're just going to use zone nine
here and connect it in with zone four, which would end up being shared with
zone 12. So I've probably been saying the wrong numbers. And we can
certainly, once we get everything connected, fix our zone List. We haven't
programmed anything yet, so it's really not relevant which zone is where,
as long as we understand.

So the important part is snip off the old resistor, strip our wire, get our
wire connected to our resistor. 6.2K resistor. We've got our black wire
connected to our resistor with our little beanie connector. No, and I
missed on that one. I snipped my resistor. Luckily, I have plenty of these
here. Try that again. Feed the wire up and in. We're going to use the
longer side here. Get a nice, tight connection. This time making sure that
both wires are up and in there. Connect it in.

So, this is our master bedroom sliding doors. And there is, again, that's
the double slider. We've got two loops run in series. We're going to land
our negative. It's going to be shared in with this one that we've been
working on. This ground in between zone three and zone four. We're going to
slide it up in there with those. This is actually our fourth resistor on
this one. To show how these two zones are actually used along with four
zones. Hence, the doubling. And our Z4, we're going to run in parallel
here, which, no, our wire just broke here. Let's strip that down a little
bit. Get a little more copper connector. Try that again. Okay, a piece of
wire fell out. Push that back up and in. Twist it down. So we've got our
zone four shared with our zone 12. Two, ten, so zone two and ten, zone
three and 11, zone four and 12. That leaves us with still needing to double
some more so we've got twelve...

I'm sorry. I take that back. So zone two is shared with zone nine. Zone
three is with ten. Zone four is with 11. And zone five is going to be with
12.

Cut off our resistor. Strip our wire. Connect in our new resistor, 6.2K
value. Clamp it down. Missed. Missed again. So we're going to strip our
wire, get our connector. Oops. Making sure that most wires are as deep as
possible in there, and clamp it down, nice and tight. And so we are sharing
our zone five here. This is zone 12, five and 12. It's a zone pair, a zone
doubling pair. Feed this wire up and in. And five is sharing a ground with
Z6, so we're going to land our resistor under the GND terminal between Z5
and Z6. And again, we've already got two under there for five and six. This
is going to be our third. And our zone 13, once we get to there, is also
going to go under there.

For now, we're going to land zone 12 in parallel with our Z5. Get it nice
and tight under there and clamp it down. Screw it down.

So, we're almost done. We've got six and seven that need to be doubled.
We've got our zone 13, which is going to go with six, and our zone 14,
which is going to go with seven.

Snip our resistor. Strip our wire. Connect our black side of our zone with
our resistor, 6.2K value. Oh, I dropped my beanie connector. I still have a
few more here so no worries. Feed our black in there along with our
resistor. Clamp it down. Making sure it's nice and tight, which it is. And
we are going to be putting our fourth resistor up under this GND, in
between Z5 and Z6, which is reflecting our zone five, our zone six, our
zone 12, and now finally, our zone 13. And these screw terminals are
designed to take multiple wires. Just make sure they're nice and tight.

And then our positive side, we're going to run in parallel along with our
matching zone six for our zone doubling pair of six and 13. Okay. Nice and
tight.

And finally we have our zone 14. This is an upstairs bedroom that wasn't
labeled. It was just labeled straight zone 14. We're going to be able to
show you with the Honeywell System, we're going to name it "upstairs
bedroom." But this is going to be sharing with zone seven for our final
zone. Which is zone 14. We do have room if we had an additional zone to do
one more, a zone 15, but since this system didn't have a zone 15, we're not
going to share anything with zone eight. So zone eight will live by itself.

So we feed our resistor in with our low end of our zone or our black wire.
We clamp down. And we are going to share, zone seven and eight share a
common. This GND terminal in between Z8 and Z7. So that's why there's
already two in there. Our zone seven and our zone eight. And now we're
going to slide in our zone 14. And then lastly, our zone seven, we're going
to run in parallel with our last zone 14 red wire.

And we have now connected all of our zones. So to recap... Nope. And I've
got a loose one. Always good to check your connections when you're done.
Let's go ahead and tighten that in. Perhaps I have to move this wire a
little. Over to the other side. You want to make sure these connections are
good, otherwise you're troubleshooting once you power up. You'll have zone
faults. So let's make sure we've got this right in advance. Of course,
these wires and all of these connectors in here, it's a little bit harder
to work with. But if we loosen up our wire, it gives us a little bit of
room to slide it in. And then nice and tight. And if we just give it a
quick little tug, we want to make sure we don't have any loose connections.
And we do not. So we're good to go now.

So now to recap. Zone one, is to Z1 plus, Z1 negative. We only have one
zone there and we're using our 2K resistor, which is our standard resistor.
Zone one is, again, set up as a fire zone so acts a little different than
the rest of the zones. We have no fire on this panel but you cannot zone
double on zone one, so we are not using anything but one zone there.

Zone two. We are running two zones in parallel. Zone two and zone nine.
You're landing your low side of your zone with two different resistor
values, one 3K, on 6.2K. It's always the lower value of the resistor
matches the low zone pairing. So two and nine, pair. Two gets the 3K, nine
gets the 6.2K resistor. You run your high side or your red wire parallel on
the Z2 terminal.

Z3 shares with ten so we've got Z3 and Z10. Positive wires run in parallel
sharing the terminal screw labeled Z3. And then we've got our 3K resistor
matching with our zone three on the black wire, the low side. We've got our
6.2K resistor shared with our zone ten black wire under there.

This GND, our common terminal here or our low side of our terminal for zone
three is also for zone four, so four shares with 11. So we've got Z4 and
Z11 wires side by side, running parallel. Here on our Z4, we've got our 3K
resistor matched with zone four. Our 6.2K resistor matched with zone 11.

Next one over, we have Z5 and Z12. We have our 3K resistor with our zone
five, our 6.25K resistor matched with our zone 12.

Next one over is Z6. We have Z6, zone six and zone 13 running parallel to
Z6. And we've got our 3K matched with our zone six, and our 6.2K resistor
matched with our zone 13.

Finally, or getting close to finally, we've got zone seven matched with
zone 14, running parallel to Z7. We've got our 3K matched with our zone
seven. 3K resistor on the low side under the GND terminal. Our 6.2K low
side matched with our zone 14 which is giving us seven and 14 here.

And then finally, zone eight, because we do not have a zone 15, is our last
connection there. Run together. Just one zone on zone eight.

Fit all these wires in. And we'll get our panel door. And pretty much,
we're good to go at the panel. We do still have to add our GSM, which we'll
show in a minute. Attach our battery, power up. But that's after we go get
our GSM board. So, for now, that's our quick lesson on zone doubling. If
you guys have any questions, please let us know. Leave comments in the
section below, because zone doubling can be tricky.

Of course you can always give us a call. 888-818-7728.

We'll be back to show you adding the Snap-On Vista-GSMv4G, or I'm sorry
Vista-GSMv4G Snap-On Cellular Card that goes right here.

So, now that we've got all our zones wired in... We were smart enough to
previously do these two knockouts at the top right corner of the VISTA-21iP
panel. The reason they have these knockouts is to fit in the antenna for
the GSM board. Obviously, with our clearance here, we're not going to be
able to have our antenna stick straight up, but we'll be able to run it
parallel. It'll be okay.

We've got this little white piece that comes along with the VISTA-GSM4G
unit, and it just snaps into the top there and gives us a nice sturdy spot
for the antenna. We're going to take our GSM. It came with these three
standoffs. We popped them off the GSM, and we already pushed them right
into these three holes. So we've got one here, one here, one here.

You've got your little connector board that matches up with the connector
on the back side of the VISTA-GSM board, the side that has the SIM card.
Every GSM from AlarmNet comes with the SIM card already installed, and all
you need to do is go ahead and align the standoffs with the GSM card and...
Oops, gently. I don't have as much leverage on the ladder as I would
like... press that board on, down on all three standoffs into the
connector. It sits in nice.

We've got our little antenna coming off of our GSM. There's a washer and a
nut here. Take that off, and we feed it up into this little plastic white
piece. Put the washer back on and put the nut back on. Screw that down
tight, which gives our GSM module a nice, tight connection for our antenna.

We've got our nice flat-blade antenna here. Again, if we try to run it
vertical, obviously it's not going to work, so we're going to run it off to
the side here. We just need to thread it in. It's hard to get a grip up
here, so I'm just using the antenna to get that connection as tight as we
can. We've now installed our VISTA-GSM4G cellular antenna card.

This is a 21iP board. You can see there's an Ethernet jack to run your
Internet connection. We're going to have to come back another day to run
our Ethernet back to our router. That's always an issue, is getting an
Ethernet cable from your router to your panel in the 21iP board, so we're
going to go ahead and just activate just with the GSM for now.

So, we now have our GSM. Our panel is all good to go. All we need to do is
put the panel door back on, plug in our transformer, plug in our battery.
We're going to go ahead and use the old battery that was with the Destiny.
The old installation company had a date on here, so we can see it's fairly
fresh, May 2012 of last year. These batteries normally last about five
years. The panel doesn't come with one, but, again, we didn't need it since
we had a good one from the old board.

So, we're good to go here. Come on, follow me. We're going to go do the
keypads now.

So we are now at our key pad. We've removed the face. This is our old
destiny apex keypad. It had our built in speaker, so the doors and windows
opened up it would tell you what zone went off. It's why we have six
connections here instead of the typical four keypad connections. And what
we're going to do is remove this back plate, take a look at the whole size
here to make sure that our 6160v programming key pad with voice that we're
going to use to replace this existing key pad is going to have a good spot
to install. So we're just removing these screws. Most key pads, especially
with the Honeywell you're going to have a back plate that can be removed
from the front like this one and you use the back plate to mount it to the
wall with the screws and the wall anchors, and you simply fix the front
part of the key pad to the back plate. That's how you mount in your key
pads.

Once we've got all these screws removed, we can take a look at how the
original hole was cut out for the original wiring so we can plan the
installation of our new key pad. Alright, key pad comes down. Alright, and
what we're going to do, so we've got an actually very small hole here which
is good. We've got our new 6160V which almost has a perfectly matching hole
and it's actually going to fit in real nice it's going to cover up all of
our old existing area and you're going to be able to have your flip-down
door, all of your key pads, so should be a nice, clean installation,
luckily. On the 6160V, at the bottom, you've got these two tabs so use a
flat head screw driver, push the tabs down and remove the back plate,
hinges at the top, and we've got our front keypad and our back plate. So we
want to align this in such a way that it's going to hide as best we can
here.

The key pad comes with some screws and some wall anchors in a baggie, so
we'll set that aside for now and we're going to try to mount this and mark
our holes. You always want your system to look nice so we'll make sure we
keep this nice and level and we also want to make sure we're going to hide
all of these remnants of the old key pad. So we're marking our three holes
at the top and we're just going to use one of the holes on the bottom. I'm
not sure if that took, let's see if we can line that up again. There we go,
so we've got our three marks and our one. We might actually just go ahead
and do two screws here. And now that I look at this, we certainly don't
want have an issue drilling and hitting the bottom of this dry wall. We
also have to worry about the top here.

So I'm going to just go just a notch above each of those holes. We've got
our drill here ready to go for our holes. Like I said I'm just worried
about drilling here and hitting the bottom edge here so we're going to try
to go just a touch above there, making sure the hole is big enough for the
wall anchor. And then this hole here, we want to go a touch above to make
sure it will line up. An assistant would be so kind as to grab the hammer
and we can hammer in our wall anchors. So again it comes with four, three
should be plenty to get this key pad in here. I've got my hammer and my
screws and wall anchors. Open up the baggie here. So we're going to do two
at the top and one at the bottom. Press them in. This is where we want to
be careful not to damage the dry wall. This is an awkward hammer. Get that
nice and flush. And we were successful in not damaging the dry wall there.
Grab our third wall anchor and push it in our bottom hole. Hammer it in.

Okay, we've got them there. We'll use our wire strippers, which has a nice
wire cut and we're going to snip all of these wires now, because we're
ready to mount the back plate and we've got to get this out of here. Thank
you. We're going to cut these wires. Old keypad is gone and if you remember
from our control panel video, of these six wires we ended up only using
blue, and again these wires were from our old destiny key pad so these two
purple, green, black, red, and white colors don't really matter, it matters
about these colors which are the ones that were landed back at the panel.
So we used blue and green for positive and negative power, so these two we
want to keep. We used green and white and our yellow for our data, in and
out. So those are the four we want, we're actually going to snip these
other two off, because we don't need them. And I'm going to snip over here.
And we know that they're not connected to anything on the other end, so
we're okay to just leave them. Obviously, you never want to leave bare wire
but when we know exactly where these are running to its okay. We want to
strip these four wires here. We'll go ahead and use this, since that's
there from the old key pad. So we just want to strip a little bit of the
end off. We've got two stripped. We've got three and four. So we've got our
four wires ready to go. We've got our three screws and our back plate.
We're going to feed our wires through the hole in the back plate.

Obviously, if you put it up without doing that, that would be a mistake.
And we align with our wall anchors. We've got our two at the top and we've
got our one at the bottom. Should give us plenty of connection so the key
pad is nice and secure. You don't want to screw one down too much until you
get the other ones in and that's what we did. And go ahead and screw it
down now. I'm having a hard time as a righty from this angle but I'm doing
my best here. And finally, screw our bottom screw down nice and tight. And
this keypad is not going anywhere.

So we're going to connect all of these now. So this one again, this purple
is connected to the green and white, which is going to the green data
terminal on the panel so we want to just screw this down, making sure it's
a nice tight connection. We've got our negative blue connected to red here,
goes to our negative terminal. We've got our green coming from our aux
power, going to our positive. And then our final connection is our
yellow... No, I mean white connected to yellow, going to yellow. Just give
a gentle tug on each wire, then we're all good. Fish this wire back up into
the hole in the wall so that we can close our key pad. And I've got that
upside down, so we're going to hinge it at the top, so we've got these
little tabs that hinge down and it snaps shut at the bottom.

And our key pad is installed. Our panel is not powered up, so you won't see
anything on the key pad, but it is ready to be addressed and powered on.
We're going to go do that and we'll be back here to deal with the key pad
to initialize the system and get it going for the programming. Now we're
going to show at a front door, installation of a Tuxedo Touch Wi-Fi. Now
that we've installed our 6160V voice annunciation keypad. It's nice that
this is here right in front of the garage door. When they come home, they
open the door, the system will speak, if they're here they'll be able to
view faults, hear what zones are open, all of that right before they leave.

So we're good here, moving on to our next key pad. So now that we've
installed everything and we have our key pad, our 6160 V addressed, the
last thing we're going to do is install our nice Tuxedo Touch, graphic
touch screen key pad right here by the front door. And now, everyone that
comes can see this beautiful graphic touch screen key pad and the home
owner's going to have access to his home automation to turns lights, locks,
and thermostats on and off right from this console here. So we've got our
old destiny keypad right here, we've already removed it. We've got our
wires, just like our 6160 V. And we're going to remove our back plate here.
I've already started on the screws.

So we remove these four, back plate comes down. Feed it through these wires
and, same as before, we've got our nice hole that's going to match up
nicely with our Honeywell Tuxedo Touch key pad, we're going to mount it in
this manner so it hides the old hole. Make sure it's level and everything.
First thing we're going to do is cut these wires off. So we've removed the
old key pad and we can now mark our holes. If my assistant would be so
kind... Oh, actually I have my pen. I don't need my assistant right now.
We're going to feed the wires through this hole here and have the back
plate on the wall. If my assistant can grab my level and make sure that we
have this aligned properly, keep it nice and clean.

I've got a nice level there. We're going to mark two holes on top and we're
going to mark one hole on the bottom. That bottom hole, just like from
before, that bottom hole is a little close to the edge of the dry wall, so
we'll drill just below that so that we don't break through this dry wall
and waste our good wall there. So we've got our drill bit. We've got screws
and wall anchors to mount and we're just going to drill our holes here. So
like I said, right below our holes is where we're going to go. Make sure
its big enough to hammer in our wall anchors. Can you get the hammer? And
then we're going to go right below our holes up here, making sure not to
drill into our wire. Matching hole. And now, fit in our three wall anchors.
Thank you. That hole's a little too small. Make it a little bigger. Got my
two. Now they fit in nicely.

And finally, feed our wires through our hole and screw in our screws to fix
the back plate to the wall. Again, you don't want to tighten the first one
all the way, but get it in most of the way. That way you can make any minor
adjustments at the end. Do one more at the top. And then we've got our
bottom hole. They're some play up and down, so we want to make sure we have
room for our bottom. Oops, dropped the screw. This one I'm going to screw
in all the way and make sure its level. Oops, dropped our level. Perfect.
I'm going to screw it in all the way now. And our last screw. And our back
plate is nice and secure.

Now we've got to connect our wires, so we've got our same sheet from before
that's showing us which wires are connected where on the panel. Again we
had six from the old destiny, because the destiny had a built-in speaker,
which the Tuxedo does not or rather the Tuxedo doesn't need two wires for
the built in speaker, it does have a speaker. So, the two that we do not
need. We need blue, green, green and white, and yellow. So these two, blue
and white and yellow and white we're going to snip off.

Now again, you don't normally want to leave bare wires here, but I know
that they're not connected to anything at the panel and they're snipped
down at the panel, so I'm just going to wrap them around the core there and
we'll be okay. We want to strip the ends here. So this is our green. It's
going to go for our aux power. We've got our blue, which is our negative
power. Strip that, and then we've got yellow and green and white for our
data in and data out going back to the key pad bus on the panel so strip
these and we've got our four connections here on the Tuxedo on the back
you've got your Ethernet port.

This is the Tuxedo Touch Wi-Fi, so we're not going to actually connect hard
line Ethernet cable. We're going to use our wireless network in the house
to connect the web server of the Tuxedo to the network, but we do need to
connect our power and our data wires. And just like on our 6160 V,
Honeywell was kind enough to label nice and clear G for green, negative for
our negative auxiliary power, positive or plus sign for our positive power,
and yellow or Y for yellow.

So, matching up with our list, blue is going to ground so our blue is
connected to this red and we're going to go to our negative terminal, fit
in the wire, screw it down nice and tight, so it's not going to go
anywhere, fits in nice. We've got blue... No, we just did that. Okay, we
have green connected to purple, that's our positive power so that's going
to the positive terminal. Screw it down. Key pad has power now. So finally,
we need green and white, which is connected to this purple cable for our G
terminal, G for green. Going to our data on our key pad bus and then
finally our yellow which is connected to this white wire is going to go to
our remaining Y for yellow terminal.

Try to keep it simple there, yellow for yellow, since we didn't have the
normal colors. The key pad is now connected, you can feed the slack of the
wire here, along with the beanie connectors, back into the wall. And there
are four mounts on the back plate. Slide it in. Slide it down. And we've
got a nice, tight installation. And it is level. So we did a good job.
We've installed our Tuxedo Touch Wi-Fi. We can go and power the panel up
and this should come online. So I will be right back after powering the
panel.

====================MISSING TRANSCRIPT Honeywell VISTA 21IP: Adding Door, Powering On ====================

So, we now have our panel all powered up, everything connected, our keypad
installed. So, what we are going to do now is address our keypad. Any
Honeywell Vista series panel that is going to use a wired keypad, the
keypad needs to be addressed before it works. We get a call all the time,
people telling us "Hey, my keypad is not working. My screen is blank. My
connections are good. I'm not sure what's wrong," and they have not
addressed the keypad.

So, keypads come with a default address of 31, for some reason. 31 is an
unaddressed address, so it doesn't do anything. So, basically, the first
keypad you have when you power your system up, you have to add to 16. 16 is
the default address of the system, as a keypad address. There are other
available addresses. Once we get one online, we can then enable the rest of
the addresses and have other keypads hooked up. But, for now, this is going
to be our only console keypad. We do have a Tuxedo, but that is a whole
'nother story that uses AUI addresses.

So, what we are going to do is, the panel is all ready, it's powered down
right now. I have my assistant in the other room. On my word, he is going
to plug it in. The way to address a keypad is, as soon as you power on, you
have up to 60 seconds to do this. So, it is important that you do this very
quickly. You are going to press and hold one and three. The keypad will
come on with "Con address =". We are going to switch it to 16, and get it
up and running.

So, if my assistant would be so kind as to plug in the transformer. Thank
you. We are now going to press and hold one and three. Con address, you can
see, it says equals 31. And set it one-six. And then star confirms the
address. It's going to ask if we want the voice chime. We do want it on, so
we are going to leave it on. We are going to press star. Keep that star.
This is standby. This is the normal screen when you're booting up.

We'll give it a minute here. Any time you power your system down and power
back up, the keypad will show this, once it's been addressed. It takes a
minute or so to go away. And we can now see, the system shows "disarmed."
Hit star for false. We've got also a "check 100" or "check 103" long-range
radio. That's our internet device that we haven't enabled. That's why it's
beeping at us. If we press star, it will silence it and you can see the
"check 103". If we press star, we will also see all of our faults. We have
a fault on zone eight.

So, I'll have to look at zone eight and see what kind of resistor value we
have. I imagine I may have made a mistake and put the wrong resistor. The
rest of the zones are happy though, so that's a good sign. So, that is how
you address a Honeywell Vista series keypad. This is a 6160V. It gives the
voice enunciation. Once we program our zones, we can show you that.

This is our keypad, fully installed.

========== MISSING TRANSCRIPT Honeywell Tuxedo Touch: Addressing Keypad to VISTA 21iP ==========
===========MISSING TRANSCRIPT Honeywell Tuxedo Touch: Turning on chime==========


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