Wireless Heat Detectors

Wireless heat detectors are important property safety devices that should be used in locations where smoke detectors may cause false alarms. This includes kitchens, bathrooms, attics, garages, and more. The devices can be easily enrolled and programmed as needed. Buy wireless heat detectors from us.
Honeywell SIXSMOKE Front - Wireless Smoke/Heat Detector for Lyric Controller
Honeywell SIXSMOKE
Wireless Smoke/Heat Detector for Lyric Controller
List Price: $100.00
Our Price: $65.99
Honeywell 5800COMBO - Smoke, Heat and CO Detector
Honeywell 5800COMBO
Smoke, Heat and CO Detector
List Price:
Our Price: $139.99
Honeywell 5808W3 - Wireless Smoke & Heat Detector
Honeywell 5808W3
Wireless Smoke & Heat Detector
List Price: $90.00
Our Price: $71.99
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DSC PG9936
PowerG 915MHz Wireless Smoke And Heat Detector
List Price:
Our Price: $59.99
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Interlogix SDX-135Z
Wireless Interconnected Photoelectric Smoke Detector with Heat and Freeze
List Price:
Our Price: $97.99
Honeywell 5809SS - Wireless Fixed Temperature/ROR Heat Detector
Honeywell 5809SS
Wireless Fixed Temperature/ROR Heat Detector
List Price:
Our Price: $64.99
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Interlogix HDX135Z
Wireless Rate-of- Rise Heat & Freeze Sensor, 135F Degrees
List Price:
Our Price: $70.99
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Interlogix HDX-200
Wireless Rate-of-Rise Heat Detector, 200F Degrees
List Price:
Our Price: $63.99
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Interlogix HDX-135
Wireless Rate-of-Rise Heat Detector, 135F Degrees
List Price:
Our Price: $60.99
2GIG SMKT3-345 - Wireless Smoke, Heat and Freeze Detector
2GIG SMKT3-345
Wireless 2GIG Smoke, Heat, & Freeze Detector
List Price: $95.00
Our Price: $77.99

Wireless heat detectors are used for detecting fires in locations where smoke detectors may cause false alarms on the system. The way that a heat detector works is by looking for the extremely high temperatures that would only be present with a fire. You should not confuse a heat detector with a temperature sensor. The typical temperature sensor will respond to high temperatures that might occur when the AC is broken so that the user can know to fix the HVAC system in the building. But a heat detector will only activate when there is a much higher temperature that wouldn't be caused by a broken HVAC system alone. The typical heat detector will activate at around 135 degrees Fahrenheit, but this will vary between different sensor models.

If you are trying to choose between smoke detectors and heat detectors, please be aware that we recommend using smoke detectors in most situations. This is because smoke detectors will respond to fires more quickly than heat detectors. But the advantage to using heat detectors in certain locations is that they are often less prone to false alarms. Fine particles can sometimes get into smoke detectors and cause them to activate when they shouldn't. This is a concern in very dusty areas such as attics and garages. High humidity is also a concern, so you won't want to use smoke detectors in bathrooms. Finally, you might not want to use a smoke detector in the kitchen, as cooking food could result in accidental activation of the smoke detector. All of these locations are great candidates for heat detectors.

Remember that there are also combination sensors that offer both smoke detection and heat detection functionality. These devices are always great, as having multiple methods for detecting a fire is almost always preferred. But if you are using the device in any of the aforementioned areas, then it might be best to just get a standalone heat sensor. There are many wireless heat detectors available, and you can certainly find one that suits your needs. Keep in mind that heat rises, so you will want to have the device mounted high up on the wall or on the ceiling. You will program the device as a Fire Zone so that the system knows to go into fire alarm once the device is activated.

All of the heat sensors listed on this page are wireless devices. This makes them easy to install for DIY users, as you do not need to run wires from the panel to the sensor. However, you must make sure that the wireless sensor communicates at a frequency that is compatible with your security system. But as wireless devices, you often do not need any tools to mount the sensor. You can usually mount using double-sided foam tape to prevent the need for drilling holes into the wall or ceiling. You may need a screwdriver to open up the sensor, but that should be it. Then assign the device to one of the wireless zones on your system. Make sure to test the sensor after installation. Many heat sensors have a test button, or you can use a hair dryer on maximum power to test.

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