Wireless Glass Break Detectors

Wireless glass break detectors alert alarm systems to broken windows or other broken glass. The sensors specifically listen for both the high-pitched shattering of glass and the low-pitched thud of an object striking against the glass. Purchase wireless glass break detecting sensors from Alarm Grid.
Honeywell SIXGB - Wireless Glass Break Detector
Honeywell SIXGB
Wireless Glass Break Detector
List Price: $120.00
Our Price: $65.99
Honeywell 5853 - Wireless Glass Break Detector (Exterior)
Honeywell 5853
Wireless Glass Break Detector
List Price: $100.00
Our Price: $77.99
Honeywell FG701 - Glass Break Simulator
Honeywell FG701
Glass Break Simulator
List Price: $70.00
Our Price: $56.99
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2GIG GB1e
Wireless Encrypted Glass Break Detector
List Price:
Our Price: $58.99
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Interlogix NX-488
ShatterPro Wireless Crystal Glassbreak Sensor
List Price:
Our Price: $94.99
DSC PG9922 - PowerG 915MHz Out Wireless Glass Break Detector
DSC PG9922
PowerG 915MHz Out Wireless Glass Break Detector
List Price:
Our Price: $67.99
Qolsys IQ Glass-S - Encrypted Glass Break Sensor for IQ Panel 2
Qolsys IQ Glass-S
Encrypted Glass Break Sensor for IQ Panel 2
List Price: $140.00
Our Price: $62.99
2GIG GB1 - Wireless Glass Break Detector
2GIG GB1
Wireless Glass Break Detector
List Price: $70.00
Our Price: $49.99
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Honeywell 5819S
Wireless Shock Sensor and Transmitter
List Price:
Our Price: $60.99
Honeywell 5800SS1 - Exterior of Wireless Shock Sensor
Honeywell 5800SS1
Wireless Shock Sensor
List Price: $60.00
Our Price: $51.99
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DSC WLS922L-433
Wireless Acuity Glassbreak Detector
List Price:
Our Price: $73.99

Wireless glass break detectors are used with many security systems. These are very useful sensors that can alert systems to many intrusion events. Their main use is to determine if an intruder has entered the home or business by smashing a window. Remember, a window can often be broken without activating a contact sensor. As long as the intruder doesn't disturb the sensor or the magnet, this can serve as a free entry into your home or business. Many users will install motion detecting sensors to monitor this type of activity. But glass break detectors can fulfill this role nicely as well.

Most wireless glass break detectors can monitor many windows at once. This usually depends on the listening range of the wireless glass break detector and where it is installed inside the room. A typical glass break detector will have a listening range of around 25 feet. As long as the windows are within that range, then the glass break detector should be able to detect when these windows are broken. Remember that the typical glass break detector will need to hear both the high-pitched shattering sound of the window breaking and the low-pitched thud of an object striking against the glass.

Whenever you are using wireless glass break detectors, it is a good idea to test them with a glass break simulator. A glass break simulator mimics the sound of breaking glass. It is much more effective in testing glass break detectors than an app that produces a glass breaking sound effect. It is recommended that you use a glass break simulator from the same manufacturer as your glass break detectors. You should use the glass break simulator from multiple angles when testing ensure that your glass break detectors can pick up the different windows being broken in the room.

The reason why glass break detectors need to hear both the high-pitched shattering and the low-pitched thud is to prevent false alarms. For example, you only want your glass break sensors to activate for true glass break events. You don't want false alarms for things like dropping silverware or someone clapping their hands. Manufacturers design their glass break sensors with careful precision so that they only activate when they are supposed to. Some glass break sensors even allow users to adjust the device sensitivity so that the detectors can meet their needs more effectively.

Please note that when choosing a wireless glass break detector, you must select a model that is compatible with your system. That means it needs to communicate at a wireless frequency that is compatible with your alarm system. For example, if you system supports the 345 MHz frequency, then you will need to choose a wireless glass break detector that communicates at 345 MHz. There are all sorts of wireless frequencies used with security systems, so make sure that the wireless sensors you choose are compatible.Wireless glass break detectors are used with many security systems. These are very useful sensors that can alert systems to many intrusion events. Their main use is to determine if an intruder has entered the home or business by smashing a window. Remember, a window can often be broken without activating a contact sensor. As long as the intruder doesn't disturb the sensor or the magnet, this can serve as a free entry into your home or business. Many users will install motion detecting sensors to monitor this type of activity. But glass break detectors can fulfill this role nicely as well.

Most wireless glass break detectors can monitor many windows at once. This usually depends on the listening range of the wireless glass break detector and where it is installed inside the room. A typical glass break detector will have a listening range of around 25 feet. As long as the windows are within that range, then the glass break detector should be able to detect when these windows are broken. Remember that the typical glass break detector will need to hear both the high-pitched shattering sound of the window breaking and the low-pitched thud of an object striking against the glass.

Whenever you are using wireless glass break detectors, it is a good idea to test them with a glass break simulator. A glass break simulator mimics the sound of breaking glass. It is much more effective in testing glass break detectors than an app that produces a glass breaking sound effect. It is recommended that you use a glass break simulator from the same manufacturer as your glass break detectors. You should use the glass break simulator from multiple angles when testing ensure that your glass break detectors can pick up the different windows being broken in the room.

The reason why glass break detectors need to hear both the high-pitched shattering and the low-pitched thud is to prevent false alarms. For example, you only want your glass break sensors to activate for true glass break events. You don't want false alarms for things like dropping silverware or someone clapping their hands. Manufacturers design their glass break sensors with careful precision so that they only activate when they are supposed to. Some glass break sensors even allow users to adjust the device sensitivity so that the detectors can meet their needs more effectively.

Please note that when choosing a wireless glass break detector, you must select a model that is compatible with your system. That means it needs to communicate at a wireless frequency that is compatible with your alarm system. For example, if you system supports the 345 MHz frequency, then you will need to choose a wireless glass break detector that communicates at 345 MHz. There are all sorts of wireless frequencies used with security systems, so make sure that the wireless sensors you choose are compatible.

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