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Hi DIYers! This is Part 2 of our Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus Install Guide. Today, we will be focusing on a variety of topics, mostly arming the system, bypassing sensors, adjusting arming settings, Bluetooth disarming, adjusting user codes, the system messaging center, and panic buttons.

Qolsys iq panel 2 at and t wireless security system with at and If you want to start from the beginning, you can find Part 1 of this series right here.

This install guide of ours is designed to follow the manual for the system. If you want to follow along with the manual for the system, then it is available here. Just keep in mind that the order in which we present information may be different from the manual. The processes shown here fully apply whether you are using an original Qolsys IQ Panel 2, or a newer Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus System. Today, we will have two (2) videos to accompany this content. With that out of the way, let's begin!

Our Part 4 video focuses primarily on Arming/Disarming the Qolsys IQ Panel 2. When you arm your system, you are putting it into a secure state. Many Sensor Groups for the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 are only active when the system is in an armed state. We recommend reviewing the Sensor Groups so that you know how different sensors will respond when the system is activated.

Qolsys iq dw mini s encrypted wireless sensors for iq panel 2 qs

To keep things simple, you will generally use Arm Away when all occupants plan to be away from the premises. When the system is in this state, there should be nobody inside the building, and nobody should be around to activate Interior Sensors. If someone will still be inside the building, but you want to put the perimeter protection points into a secure state, then you can put the system into Arm Stay mode. This way, the system will not go into alarm if Interior Sensors are activated. However, the system will still respond to Perimeter Zones and Entry/Exit Zones.

You will also likely want to adjust the various arming settings for your Qolsys IQ Panel 2 System. There is an entire menu in system settings for this purpose. You may also want to adjust your Entry Delays and Exit Delays. In the simplest terms, Entry Delay is how long you have to disarm the system after activating an Entry/Exit Zone before an alarm will occur. Exit Delay is how long you have to vacate the premises when Arming Away before the arming setting will go into effect. Once the Arm Away setting has gone into effect, then activating an Entry/Exit Zone will trigger the Entry Delay countdown, and you will need to disarm within that time period. It is also important to understand that there are both Normal Entry/Exit Delays and Long Entry/Exit Delays. The Long Entry/Exit Delays are important to adjust if you are using any zones with Sensor Group 12 - Entry/Exit - Long Delay. Use this zone type for a door that you may sometimes use to enter or exit but that is further from the system, and so requires a longer delay period. If you do not have any zones like this, then the Long Entry/Exit Delays are irrelevant.

One convenient feature for the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 is automatic Bluetooth disarming. If enabled, this will have the system automatically disarm when you bring your phone within Bluetooth range of the system. The way that this works is that the system expects you to bring your phone with you when you arm the system and leave for the day. When you return later on, you will bring your phone back with you. The system will automatically receive the Bluetooth signal from your phone, and it will disarm without you needing to enter a code. Remember, this feature only works if you enable it. This will require you to program your phone with the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 System as a Bluetooth device. You will also want to make sure you adjust the Bluetooth settings for the panel accordingly.

Our Part 5 video covers some miscellaneous tips for the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 System. Specifically, we cover system codes, the messaging center, and system panic buttons. Setting up user codes is something you will likely do if someone new is now using the panel, and they need their own code. Likewise, you may want to delete a code if someone is no longer permitted to use your system. At the very least, you should change the system Master Code (also called Admin) away from its default of 1234. Keeping this code at 1234 is a major security risk!

The messaging center for the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 is a great way to see if any events occurred on your system while you were away. These events can include things like someone making an incorrect code entry, a system trouble that occurred, an alarm on the system, and so much more. You can conveniently access this section right from the main screen of your IQ Panel 2. If you see that your messaging center has a notification, then you should check it as soon as you can so that you can see what occurred on your system. Once you "acknowledge" the notifications, the messages will clear.

Lastly, there is a section of the main screen of the IQ Panel 2 where you can trigger emergency panics. These include Police Panics, Fire Alarms, and Auxiliary Medical Panics. Additionally, you can activate Police and Medical Panics as "silent" so that no audible siren occurs when the alarm is triggered. Keep in mind that these panics are really only useful if you have your IQ Panel 2 monitored with central station monitoring service. The central station will receive the incoming alert and know to take action immediately. If you only have self-monitoring service, then a notification for the alarm will still be sent to you via text and/or email notification. But if you already knowingly triggered one of the system panic buttons, then that isn't very useful. However, for users with central station service, these panic buttons can be a quick and easy way to get help during an emergency.


We hope that these videos help you get started with your new Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus System! Remember, you can always email us at support@alarmgrid.com if you have any further questions or if you need further assistance. Our support hours are from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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Hi DIYers! Today, we're presenting our own guide for installing the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus. This system is very easy to use, and it can be installed by virtually anyone using nothing more than a screwdriver! This is the perfect security system for your home, office, or apartment!

Qolsys iq panel 2 at and t wireless security system with at and Most of the information presented in this post can be found in the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 DIY Installation Manual. You are free to follow along with that manual, which can be found here. We also have three (3) videos that we will include along the way. Feel free to follow along with those as well. All of this information applies to both the original IQ Panel 2 and the newer IQ Panel 2 Plus. With that out of the way, let's get started!

The first thing you will want to do is power on the system. The Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus comes with everything you need to get started. Once you have opened up the box, you should locate the panel, the power supply transformer, the power wire, the panel back cover, and the table stand. You will also want to have a screwdriver on hand.


Start by connecting the spade lugs of the power cable to the transformer. The IQ Panel 2 Plus uses DC power, so you must make sure to follow polarity. That means connecting the positive (+) wire and negative (-) wire accordingly. The positive and negative ends on the IQ Panel 2 power cable are marked for this purpose. The positive (+) wire has grey dashes and ends in a red spade connector. The negative (-) wire is solid white without grey dashes and ends in a black spade connector. Make sure that the wires are connected with the proper terminals on the transformer. You can see the positive (+) and negative (-) terminals marked on the transformer. The connection should be nice and snug, but not overly tight.

From there, you can connect the other end of the power cable to the IQ Panel 2 Plus System. There is a simple barrel connection for this purpose. The transformer can then be plugged into a wall outlet. When applying the panel back cover, make sure to run both the power cable and the thin RF receiver cable out from the indentation on the back cover. The back cover should snap nicely into place. The convenient table stand can be installed by putting it into the keyhole slots on the back of the panel and then sliding up. You can power on the system by pressing and holding the side power button until the system LED remains lit.


After the system powers on and boots up, you will be greeted by the Setup Wizard. It is recommended that you go through the Setup Wizard, as it will walk you through the entire setup process. Note that some steps of the Wizard will require you to activate the system for monitoring service. This involves registering the panel's built-in cellular communicator with Alarm.com. This is optional for initial set up. You can always register the cellular communicator with Alarm.com later.

Remember that activating the system is something you will definitely want to do before too long, as that is the only way for it to send out signals to you and/or a central station. Remember that you will need to provide the IMEI Number for the system in order for your monitoring company to activate the cellular communicator. This can be found on a sticker on the back of the panel. It will also be shown as you move through the Wizard.

You will do several things as you go through the Setup Wizard. You will connect the system to a WIFI network, run an initial check for the system, add sensors, perform an initial sensor test, set up the built-in panel glass break sensor, add Z-Wave home automation devices, pair your phone for automatic Bluetooth disarming, pair secondary IQ Remote Keypads, and add system users. Remember that you will want to have a good idea of Sensor Groups when enrolling sensors. You can learn all about the IQ Panel 2 Sensor Groups in this helpful FAQ.


The last thing you will want to do is install your sensors. We only focused on door and window contacts and motion sensors, but many of the same principles apply across any sensor type. What's great about wireless sensors that are used with the IQ Panel 2 Plus is that they can be mounted without drilling holes into the wall or using any power tools. You can safely mount and secure these sensors using double-sided foam tape. Most wireless sensors come with their own double-sided tape for this purpose, or you can buy some off our site!

There are a few general tips when mounting these sensors. When mounting door and window contacts, you should have the magnet on the moving structure of the door or window, and the sensor itself on the door or window frame. Make sure the magnet is aligned with any indication marker shown on the sensor. Also remember to keep the magnet spacing gap in mind. Most Qolsys Door and Window Sensors allow for a magnet spacing gap of up to 0.75 inches.


As for motion sensors, you should have them mounted flat on a wall or corner-mounted. But keep in mind that only a flat-mount will allow you to install without drilling any holes. The motion sensor should be nice and level, and it should be installed at a height between 6 and 8 feet. Qolsys recommends 7.5 feet, which provides the best possible results. The motion sensor should not be facing any windows, vents, or air ducts. It should also not be facing any nearby furniture or stairwells if you have pets!

Most importantly, remember to test ALL your sensors after the final installation!


And that wraps up our Part 1 Guide for installing and using the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus. Look forward to Part 2 coming soon! If you have any questions about the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus or our monitoring service, please reach out to us by emailing support@alarmgrid.com. Remember that our support hours are from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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Hi DIYers, and Happy Halloween! We are celebrating the holiday with a new sign for our headquarters. We went with blue of course, and we think the end result looks great! A special thank you goes out to the workers who did an outstanding job of putting up the sign and helping us stand out.


Alarm Grid has come a long way in its 7+ years of existence. Originally, orders were being processed right out of the home for one of the owners. Now we have our own building with our own beautiful sign. We would like to thank each and every one of our customers who helped make this possible. Thank you for your continued support, and you can expect more big things from us moving forward.

As usual, if you want to learn more about our monitoring services or our products, you can always email us at support@alarmgrid.com. Remember that our support hours run from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We will check your email at our earliest convenience and reply back as soon as we can. We look forward to hearing from you!

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Door alarm sensors, or contacts, are some of the most important devices used with security systems. These devices alert a user whenever their door is opened. They can be used on virtually any type of door. These might include a front door, a back door, screen doors, a patio door, a shed, cabinets and any door inside the building. We typically find that door alarm sensors are some of the easiest to use devices with an alarm system. But still, it can be helpful to read through a comprehensive guide explaining the full ins and outs of these devices. So it here is - everything you've ever to know about door alarm sensors.

Qolsys iq dw mini s encrypted wireless sensors for iq panel 2 qsThe Basics of Door Alarm Sensors

Most traditional door sensors feature a relatively simple design and premise. These devices usually consist of a sensor and a magnet. The sensor is placed on or inside the door frame, and the magnet is placed on or inside the door itself, within a half inch of the sensor. Opening the door will cause the magnet to pull away and separate from the sensor. When this happens, a reed switch inside the sensor will activate. This will cause the sensor to send a signal to the security system, letting it know that the door was opened. The system will then perform the appropriate response based on how the sensor's Response Type was programmed. At the surface, it's all very simple. Some examples of these traditional sensors include the Honeywell 5800MINI, the Honeywell SiXMINICT and the VERSA-2GIG Sensor. Traditional door sensors can be either surface-mounted or recessed.

Honeywell 5800mini interior wireless door and window sensor

There's also a second variation of door sensors, known as mechanical door sensors. This type of sensor features a physical switch that is pressed down when the door is closed. When the door is opened, the switch will pop up, causing the sensor to activate. From there, the system will perform the Response Type assigned to the zone for that sensor. This type of door alarm sensor is far less common than the other type of sensor. However, the end result is still the same - the system will still perform the programmed Response Type when the sensor is activated. An example of this type of sensor is the Honeywell 5800RPS. While you are less likely to come across this type of door sensor, it's still worth mentioning just in case. Mechanical door sensors are only available in the recessed variety.

Honeywell 5800rps wireless recessed door and window plunger sensTypes of Door Sensors - The Two Distinctions

Now that you know the very basics of door sensors, you can start thinking about the different types. While almost every door sensors operates using one of the two mechanisms mentioned above, there are two other distinctions that are commonly made between door sensors. These are whether the door sensor is wireless or wired and whether the door sensor is surface-mounted or recessed. These considerations will play a big role in determining which door sensor you choose to purchase for your alarm system.

A wireless door sensor will communicate with an alarm system wirelessly. This will prevent the need for running a wire from the system to the door sensor. This can make wireless door sensors significantly easier to install. Another great aspect of wireless door sensors is that they can usually be auto-enrolled with the security system. That said, a wireless sensor will need to have its battery replaced every three to five years. On the other hand, a wired door sensor will need to be physically connected with the alarm system. This can make the installation considerably more difficult in certain cases. However, a wired sensor will never require any battery replacements.

If you are using a wireless door sensor with a wired alarm system, such as a Honeywell VISTA Panel, then you will need to use a wireless receiver. This will allow the wireless signal to be received by the system. When choosing a wireless door sensor, make sure that the wireless frequencies it uses are compatible with your alarm system. For example, Honeywell Panels look for wireless signals that operate at a frequency of 345 MHz, while Qolsys Panels use signals that operate at a frequency of 319.5 MHz. If you try to use a wireless door sensor that does not communicate at the correct wireless frequency, then it will not function with the alarm system.

Honeywell 5800rp wireless repeaterThe other major distinction between door sensors is surface-mount sensors versus recessed sensors. Simply put, surface-mount sensors are installed on the outside of the door and its frame, while recessed sensors are installed in the inside. Surface-mount sensors require no drilling. In the easiest scenario, it is possible to mount them using a double-sided adhesive (foam tape). They can also be mounted using screws. With their easier installation, this is generally the preferred type of door sensor. Most users do not mind the fact that a small sensor will be visible on the outside of the door.

Honeywell 5820l super slim wireless door and window sensorHowever, for users who do want a more discrete installation, there are recessed door sensors. These sensors and their magnets need to be inserted into holes that are drilled into both the door and the frame. The exact size of the holes will depend on the specific model of the recessed door sensor that is being installed. Once the sensor and magnet have been installed, they will not be visible from the outside. That said, most users opt for surface-mount door sensors due to the easier installation.

Honeywell 5818mnl wireless recessed door sensor and window senso

Some Notes on Response Types

The primary function of any security sensor is determined by its Response Type. This refers to what action the system will take when the zone is faulted (e.g. the door is opened). Below are the Response Types that are most commonly used with door sensors:

  • Entry / Exit: If the door is opened while the system is armed stay or armed away, then the system will need to be disarmed within its entry delay period. If the system is not disarmed within this time period, then an alarm event will occur. Most alarms will feature two different Entry / Exit settings. This allows two different entry delay periods to be used on the same system for different zones.
  • Perimeter: If the door is opened while the system is armed stay or armed away, then an alarm event will occur immediately.
  • Interior Follower: If the system is set to armed away, an alarm event will immediately occur if the door is opened, assuming that an entry / exit zone is not faulted first. If an entry / exit zone is faulted first, then the system must be disarmed within its entry delay period, otherwise an alarm event will occur.
  • Interior With Delay: If the system is set to armed away and the door is opened, then the system must be disarmed within its entry delay period. If the system is not disarmed within this time period, then an alarm event will occur.
  • Day / Night: If the system is disarmed and the door is opened, a trouble event will occur on the system. If the system is armed away or armed stay and the door is opened, an alarm event will immediately occur on the system.
  • 24 Hour Audible: Opening the door will immediately cause a full system siren and an alarm to be set off, regardless of what state the system is currently in. This Response Type should not be used unless the door should never be opened for any reason.
  • 24 Hour Auxiliary: Same as 24 Hour Audible, but only the panel itself will produce a siren. Any external sirens or noisemakers will not activate. This zone type is ideal for emergency medical cabinets that would only be opened in a serious medical emergency.
  • 24 Hour Silent: Same as 24 Hour Audible, but no siren or sound will be produced.
  • Fire No Verification: Opening the door will immediately cause a fire alarm to be set off, regardless of what state the system is currently in. This is the ideal Response Type for fire doors.

Certain Response Types are only available for certain Device Types. Depending upon the panel you are using, not all of these Response Types will be made available for the Device Type of "Door". A way to work around this is to set the Device Type to "Other". This will allow you to set any possible Response Type for the door sensor.

2gig dw10 wireless slim door slash window contactOther Programming Settings

Programming a door sensor has to do with more than just the Response Type and the Device Type. Below are some of the other programming settings available for a door sensor. Please note that these settings are specific for a Honeywell Lyric Controller, and different settings may be available on another type of panel.

  • Serial Number: This is how the system will specifically identify the exact door sensor that is being used.
  • Loop Number: This tells the door sensor what function it should perform. Each door sensor usually has a specific loop number that should be set for the device to function as a door sensor. Some door sensors have multiple possible functions that can be used with the device. One example is the Honeywell 5816, which can be used as both a door sensor and as a wireless transmitter depending upon the loop number that is set.
  • Zone Descriptors: These serve as the name of the door sensor. The panel will announce the zone descriptors whenever the zone for that sensor is affected.
  • Alarm Report: This tells the system whether or not it should send an outbound signal to the central monitoring station. If you turn this off, then all the sounds and sirens will still be made, but a distress signal will never be sent to the central station. An example for turning this off might be if you are monitoring a liquor cabinet to make sure your teenage doesn't get into it. You might want a very loud siren to go off so that you know if this happens. However, you obviously wouldn't want the police to show up at your house in this situation!
  • Chime: This will have the panel produce a simple chime whenever the door is opened. Many panels will allow you to toggle between different chime options for the panel. Remember, you will still need to have the local chime for the system enabled from the main settings menu.
  • Supervision: This will have the system monitor the door sensor for low battery or loss of signal. Keep this enabled to make sure that the door sensor is always in proper working order. This setting is only used with wireless door sensors.

For any programming questions related to a specific panel, please consult the programming guide for that panel. This information is readily available on the Alarm Grid website in the form of FAQs.

Honeywell 5816 wireless door window sensor

Common Door Sensor Questions

Below are some questions that are commonly asked about door sensors:

1. How do I program my door sensor?

If it is a wireless door sensor, it can most likely be auto-enrolled.This is accomplished by accessing zone programming on the system and then faulting and restoring the door sensor three times to learn it in. You can fault and restore the door sensor by separating the sensor and the magnet and then clicking them back together. From there, make any necessary programming configurations on the panel. See the above information on Response Types and other programming settings.

If it is a wired door sensor with a hardwired VISTA Panel, then we recommend consulting this FAQ. You may also need to consult the VISTA 15P and 20P Programming Guide.

Honeywell vista 15p alarm control panel

2. How long do door sensor batteries last?

A wireless door sensor will typically require a battery replacement every three to five years. Wired door sensors do not use batteries, and they will never require a battery replacement.

Panasonic cr123a 3v battery

3. How close should the door sensor be to its magnet?

We usually recommend placing the door sensor magnet within a half inch of the sensor. Some sensors may allow for a greater separation distance than others before a faulted zone will occur. The closer the magnet is to the sensor, the less likely an unwanted fault or a false alarm is to occur.

Honeywell 5899 magnet for 5816 wireless door sensor and window s

4. Are there any encrypted wireless door sensors?

Yes, there are encrypted wireless door sensors. The Honeywell SiXCT, the Honeywell SiXMINICT, the Qolsys IQ DW MINI-S and the Qolsys IQ Recessed Door-S are all encrypted wireless door sensors.

Honeywell sixct wireless door slash window contact for lyric con

5. What is the best door sensor?

Please see the following FAQs:

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The idea of installing a whole security system all by yourself might seem daunting. Trust us when we say it's not. The Honeywell L5200 security systems are both high quality, and incredibly simple for end-users to install. We've put this nuts to bolts blog post together using our YouTube channel to give you the resources to do everything you need to make sure your system is in order.

Installing the L5200

Making sure that the L5200 is properly installed is the key to a successful installation. If you want to mount it on your wall, follow the instructions on our L7000 installation video (which uses wire track) or our L5100 installation video (wherein Sterling fishes the LT-cable through the wall). Whether you're putting the L5200 on a flat surface using the L5000DM, or mounting it on the wall, the installation is straightforward.

Installing the Communicator(s)

The communicators are simple to put into the system. For those with an iLP5 who did not buy one of our pre-made kits, the installation is simple as well. For the rest of you, the kits come with either the L5100-WIFI, the 3GL, or both. In the following video, Sterling installs the L5100-WIFI into the L5200 security system. As you can see, opening up the system, and mounting it to the board on the right side couldn't be easier.

The 3GL (which at the time of our filming was called GSMVLP5-4G) is about as quick. While Honeywell recommends that it be affixed with screws, the installation should take you no more than a few minutes.

Programming the Sensors

Our kits, for the most part, come with Honeywell's wireless 5811 sensor. Below is a video on programming the 5811 sensor to the L5200 security system.

We do have kits with the 5816s. If you have purchased a kit including some 5816s, the difference in programming is significant enough that it's worth watching the 5816 programming video. The most common issue that end users run into when programming a 5816 is setting it to loop 1 as is commonly done with every other sensor. In the case of the 5816, loop 1 is reserved for when the 5816 is being used as a wired to wireless transmitter. Loop 2, on the other hand, is what one uses when using the 5816 as a traditional wireless security sensor.

The 5800PIR-RES motion detector is the motion sensor that comes with the kits. An excellent motion with pet immunity, the sensor is simple to program and install. In the video below, Sterling explains how to install program the sensor to the L5200.

Finally, the security system comes with a Honeywell 5834-4, 4-button key fob. Programming the key fob is quite like programming all the other sensors, though it is programmed in a section different from the other sensors as you can see in the following video.

Installing the Sensors

The sensors are simple to install. The 5811s can be installed on a door or window with the right amount of lip. In the following video, Sterling installs the 5811s on a double french door.

Motion sensors are a little bit more tricky. While the sensor is programmed, a installation requires 1) a walk-test to ensure that it is installed in a location that will adequately protect a room, in addition to 2) drilling it into a location on the wall. Below we demonstrate the walk-test that should be performed before installation.

Once a walk-test confirms the mounting location is correct, you can install the 5800PIR-RES in a corner mount location.

Following these instructions will help you complete the installation of your L5200 security system.

If you find these videos helpful, we'd love for you to subscribe to our youtube channel.

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One of the big gripes people have with the LYNX panels is that the only siren that it works with is the 5800WAVE. The truth is that Honeywell's wireless security system can be made to work with any wired siren. It just takes a little bit more work. We've done our best to make it simple with FAQsmanuals, and even an Alarm Grid kit, but we have been missing the most important, helpful element: videos. The following video can be viewed as a series on YouTube (if you head over there, be sure to subscribe to the Alarm Grid channel), or you can watch it in order right below.

In this first video, we show you the Alarm Grid LYNX-EXT. It's the simplest, cheapest way to get an external sounder to work with your wireless security system without having to run a wire. The LYNX-WEXT works roughly the same way as the one in the video below, however, a wire needs to be run from the relay in the WEXT to the system itself.

Putting everything together in the LYNX-EXT is really simple. Sterling goes through the wiring, and how to connect it to the wireless security system.

Sterling goes in depth about how to choose the wired sirens you would like to use, and how to do a quick power calculation on your system. In this video, we demonstrate the strongest siren we sell, the Amseco 52s, which will make a 120dB fuss if the system is breached.

Sterling gives a quick explanation about how to properly wire the siren and the strobe. Once this is done, all that is left to do is set the house ID codes in the system and the 5800RL.

Setting the House ID Codes on the LYNX Touch Units

All three of the next videos demonstrate how to set the house ID whether your system is an older, discontinued L5100, or the newer L5200 and L7000.

Setting the House ID on the 5800RL

Like most Honeywell sensors, the 5800RL uses dip switches to pick its House ID. It is the same way that the 5800WAVE works. Setting these dip switches will allow the system to communicate with the horn so that the siren can start blaring the second you need it most.


Honeywell's AD12612 is the best selling power supply in any kit. Sterling takes us through how to wire the LYNX-EXT to the power supply and external sounder. 


The Panics!

Both to show it works, as well as allowing anyone who is curious a chance to listen to the panic sounds. Below are videos of Sterling demonstrating both the Police Panic and the Fire Panic.



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So now that our fearless leader is hitched and I'm not off to any weddings, it's time to return to what I'm sure is everyone's favorite part of Friday: the Owner DIY Blog!

As I introduced in my blog post two weeks ago, I have a Honeywell LYNX L5100  system installed in my home. But it didn't just install itself. I'm here to document how we did it!

So a little background on my house. Like many people in Florida who hate putting up shutters on their second floor, I have high impact Hurricane windows and doors.  


And I don't just have them. I have a LOT of them. Being an older, remodeled home, I have them in all shapes and sizes. French doors, sliding glass doors, and way too many windows.

So when it came time to designing my security system, we had to put a lot of thought into picking the right door and window sensors.

First, let's consider the windows. There's a ton of them and clearly we want to protect that method of entry. 

Since there's over 40 of them (many of the windows are double-hung and multiple panels per opening), we had to rule out wireless window sensors. Even at those affordable Alarm Grid prices, they're unrealistic in that quantity.

We couldn't even use glass break detectors. Impact glass functions a lot like bullet proof glass. It won't shatter and set off the detectors.

So we settled on a few motion detectors placed cleverly throughout the house. Luckily since my manly 9 pound Shih Tzu just squeezes under the 80 lb limit of the Honeywell 5800PIR-RESthe choice of which one to use was obvious.

Need help installing yours? We have a great Honeywell 5800PIR-RES installation video.

With three of those placed in rooms with entryways and hallways outside the rest of the rooms, it was time to move on to the doors. Oh the many doors.

Since I'm a snob, I knew the standard and popular Honeywell 5816 just wasn't thin enough for me. I needed the slightly more expensive, but way more discreet Honeywell 5811.

For the many sliding glass doors, I needed to install two door sensors per door because the doors could open from either direction. Looking for help? We have a great video showing how to install door sensors on a sliding glass door.

For the French doors / double front door? Luckily, one side was a dummy / passive door that locked into the frame. We were able to get away with just one sensor on the active side. Again, we have a great French door installation video for the 5811.

Any questions or concerns on how to design your security system? Next up we'll go over some of the cool stuff we did with Z-Wave. 

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