Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS Posts

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Welcome to our PROA7PLUS Cheatsheet! This document will cover various procedures and information associated with the Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS, Honeywell Home PROA7, Resideo PROA7PLUSC, and Resideo PROA7C. First we'll cover a preface, and then we'll dive deep into various system processes.

Table of Contents


Preface

The PROA7PLUS, along with its variants, represents the latest alarm panel from Honeywell Home and Resideo. Sometimes referred to as the ProSeries 7" All-In-One Systems, these are wireless all-in-one panels that connect with AlarmNet for alarm monitoring service. They can also be set up for use with the Total Connect 2.0 interactive platform, provided that access to the service is included in the user's alarm monitoring plan. Since AlarmNet supports IP-only alarm monitoring, cellular-only alarm monitoring, and dual-path alarm monitoring with both IP and cellular, you can technically use the PROA7PLUS and its variants with any alarm monitoring plan from Alarm Grid. To learn more about the Alarm Grid Monitoring Plans, please review this helpful post.

It should be mentioned that end-user programming for the ProSeries Panels is not available as of May 2021. The feature is currently in beta development and only available to those in the alarm industry. That is how we are able to provide information on how end-user programming looks and how it works. It is expected that the feature will be made available to the general public via a firmware update in the very near future. But please note that if your ProSeries System has not yet been updated to the firmware version that supports end-user programming, then the feature will not be available on your panel.

Right out of the box, the ProSeries Panels can support all of the Honeywell Home PROSIX Series Sensors and the Honeywell SiX Series Sensors that were originally built for use with the Honeywell Lyric Alarm System. It is important to note that once you pair a SiX Series Sensor with a ProSeries Panel, it will receive a firmware update and can never be reverted back to be used with a Lyric again. Once it goes to ProSeries Panel, it can never go back. The ProSeries Panels each have (127) zones available for the encrypted PROSIX and SiX Series Sensors.

Legacy sensor support is also available for the ProSeries Panels. If you add a Honeywell Home PROTAKEOVER Module to the panel, then you can pair sensors from one (1) of five (5) possible legacy frequency. The legacy frequency you decide to use is selected via an adjustable dial on the PROTAKEOVER Module. The available options include Honeywell 5800 Sensors (but not 2GIG), 2GIG 345 MHz Sensors (but not Honeywell), 319.5 MHz Sensors (Qolsys, Interlogix, GE), 433 MHz Sensors (DSC), and Bosch Sensors. You can only add one (1) PROTAKEOVER Module to a ProSeries Panel, so only one (1) legacy frequency can be used with the system at any given time. Up to (123) legacy zones are available on the ProSeries Panels. When combined with the encrypted zones for PROSIX and SiX Sensors, a maximum total of (250) zones are available on one of these systems.

One key characteristic of the PROA7PLUS is that the system is split into four (4) different variants, based on two (2) deciding factors, with each factor having two (2) options. First, you must decide whether you want the PLUS version or the BASE version. Most users ultimately go with the PLUS version, as the BASE version is more limited and requires an added communicator to get the system monitored. Second, you must decide whether you want the Honeywell Home version for residential use or the Resideo version for commercial use. Unlike the first decision, this second one really comes down to personal preference, and it won't really affect the performance of the system in any way.


PLUS Versions
BASE Versions
Honeywell Home Versions
Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS

Honeywell Home PROA7

Resideo Versions
Resideo PROA7PLUSC

Resideo PROA7C

PLUS vs. BASE

Most users who buy a ProSeries System opt for a PLUS Model. There are a few differences to be discussed between the PLUS Models and the BASE Models. A PLUS Model comes with a Honeywell Home PROWIFIZW Module already built-in for WIFI and Z-Wave Plus support. A BASE Model does not have this, but you can add one separately. If you only want WIFI support, and you don't care about Z-Wave Plus for home automation, then there is also a Honeywell Home PROWIFI that provides WIFI, but no Z-Wave Plus. Honeywell has chosen to go with a very modular design, so that users don't have to pay for features they may never intend to use.

A PLUS Model can be set up for IP-only monitoring (WIFI) right out of the box. You only need to add a cellular communicator if you want to set up a PLUS Model for dual-path monitoring with both IP and cellular. Conversely, a BASE Model cannot be set up for alarm monitoring right out of the box, as it does not have a built-in communicator. You must add an IP communicator and/or a cellular communicator to get the system monitored. If, for example, you want cellular-only monitoring, it may make sense for you to buy the BASE Model, and a cellular communicator, but only if you don't want any of the other features that are supported only on the PLUS Model. We'll cover those features in just a bit.

For reference, the IP communicators are WIFI modules that support wireless WIFI connectivity, and they cannot be used for wired ethernet connectivity. The options include the Honeywell Home PROWIFI, which adds WIFI only, and the Honeywell Home PROWIFIZW, which adds both WIFI and Z-Wave Plus. As of May 2021, only LTE modules are available for cellular connectivity. The options include the Honeywell Home PROLTE-A (AT&T LTE) and the Honeywell Home PROLTE-V (Verizon LTE). It's possible that a 5G cellular module might be released for the system someday, but that is not an option now.

There are two (2) other big differences between the PLUS Models and the BASE Models. One, a PLUS Model has a built-in camera for taking disarm photos on the system, while a BASE Model does not have an integrated camera. There is no way to add a panel camera to a BASE Model, so this will always be a feature you miss out on if you decide to get a BASE Model. Two, a PLUS Model supports Bluetooth LE connectivity for automatic Bluetooth disarming, while a BASE Model does not support Bluetooth. There is no way to add Bluetooth connectivity to a BASE Model, so again, this will be a feature you miss out on if you opt for a Base Model.

Honeywell Home vs. Resideo

Unlike the PLUS vs. BASE debate, the Honeywell Home vs. Resideo decision is more of a personal preference decision. The difference here is that the Honeywell Home Models say "Honeywell Home" across the front, while the Resideo Models say "Resideo" across the front. Other than that, they are exactly the same. Technically speaking, the Honeywell Home Models are intended for residential use, while the Resideo Models are intended for commercial or industrial use. But there is actually nothing stopping you from using a Resideo Model inside a home, or a Honeywell Home Model inside a business. For more information on the subject, we recommend checking out this blog we wrote on the subject.


General System Information

Below is some of the general information for the Honeywell Home and Resideo ProSeries Panels:

  • Panel Type: Wireless All-In-One
  • Voltage Input: 9VDC, 2.5A Transformer (Included - P/N 300-10260)
  • Backup Battery: 24 Hour Rechargeable Lithium Ion 3.6/4.2V, 5200mAH (Included - P/N 300-11186)
  • Total Zones: 250 Security Protection Zones
  • PROSIX and SiX Series Zones: 127 Zones
  • Legacy RF Support: 123 Zones, 319.5 MHz, 345 MHz, 433 MHz, or Bosch (with added takeover module)
  • Legacy RF Notes: Uni-Directional Only; Requires PROTAKEOVER Module
  • KeyFob Slots: 32 (ProSix & SiX Fobs)
  • User Codes: 96 (Master Code Hardcoded to Slot 1)
  • Partitions: 4
  • Automation: Z-Wave Plus (Automatically Included with PLUS Models Only)
  • Z-Wave Device Limit: 78 (Automatically Included with for PLUS Models)
  • Compatible Keypads: Resideo PROSIXLCDKP, Resideo PROWLTOUCH (Requires PROWIFIZW or PROWIFI)
  • Maximum Keypads: 8 per Partition
  • Event Log: 4,000 Events
  • Other Features: WIFI. The following features are supported on the PLUS Model only: Integrated Camera, Automatic Bluetooth Disarming, Wiselink (PROINDMV & PROOUTMV)
  • Package Contents: Panel, PROWIFIZW Module (installed, PLUS Models Only), Transformer (9VDC, 2.5A), Backup Battery, Manuals, Mounting Hardware w/ Wall Plate
  • Dimensions: 5.75"L x 7.875"W x 1.0"D
  • Mounting Options: Wall Mount or Desk Mount (Sold Separately)
  • Default Master Code: 1234 (should change for security purposes)
  • Default Installer Code: 4112 (recommended to keep at default)


Wiring

The ProSeries Alarm Panels include a transformer for powering on the system, but a user must supply their own wiring. The use of a prepared wire, such as a Honeywell LT-Cable is advised. However, traditional wiring is perfectly suitable. You should use a wire gauge between 16-gauge and 22-gauge. If you decide to use traditional wiring that you have prepared yourself, then please observe the following strict wire limits:

Wire Gauge Max Wire Run
16 AWG 110 Feet
18 AWG 70 Feet
20 AWG 45 Feet
22 AWG 25 Feet


System Arming

Arming the security system puts it into a secured state. If activity is detected while the system is armed (e.g. a door/window being opened, movement being detected, etc.), then the system may go into immediate alarm or require that a user verify their identity with a valid code to prevent an alarm. Please note that this does not apply to 24-Hour Zones, which will trigger an immediate alarm when activated, even if the system is in a disarmed state. Common examples of 24-Hour Zones include smoke detectors, carbon monoxide detectors, and emergency exit doors.

To arm a ProSeries Panel, click the ARM button on the main screen. Then choose the arming type to arm the system. You can Arm Away or Arm Home, with Arm Home being the system's version of Arm Stay. The difference between these arming modes is that interior sensors are automatically bypassed (ignored) when you choose Arm Home. This allows anyone still inside the building to move around freely, without triggering a false alarm. But in Arm Away, interior sensors are active and able to cause alarms on the system. There should be nobody remaining inside the building after you have enabled Arm Away mode. Please note that at least one (1) Entry/Exit Zone must be faulted during the Exit Delay countdown when Arming Away, or else the system will revert to Arm Home mode instead. This is because the system will assume no one left after arming, and that the user must have meant to Arm Stay. This is known as Auto-Stay Arming, and it is a false alarm prevention feature.

Keep in mind that if multiple partitions are set up with the system, then you will be able to select which partition you want to control before you press the ARM button on the main screen. You can select any of the four (4) partitions that are enabled on the system. A partition dropdown selection option will only be shown if multiple partitions are configured on the system. If partitions have not yet been configured, and the system still only has a single partition, then this dropdown option will not be displayed. Partitions are covered in greater detail later in this cheatsheet.

Another option called Arm Night will also be available if you have at least one motion sensor programmed on the system with the Arm Night feature enabled. Arm Night is a more secure version of Arm Home (Stay), in which any interior motion sensor with the Arm Night feature enabled will NOT be automatically bypassed. That is, if that sensor detects activity while in Arm Night mode, it will trigger a response (e.g. an alarm) on the system. Meanwhile, motion sensors that have Arm Night disabled will be bypassed and ignored by the system.

Also when arming the system, you can choose to enable or disable Entry Delay and Silent Exit. The default selection is to enable Entry Delay, and disable Silent Exit. If Entry Delay is disabled it will result in the system going into immediate alarm when an Entry/Exit Zone is faulted, as opposed to going into an Entry Delay countdown, during which the user can disarm the system before an alarm occurs. Silent Exit being enabled will result in the panel not producing any sounds as the Exit Delay countdown occurs. Please note that if Silent Exit is enabled, then the Exit Delay countdown timer will be automatically doubled for that arming session. This will give the user extra time to vacate the building, as there won't be any countdown timer reminding them that they need to exit immediately.


Please note that you can also arm the system via Total Connect 2.0 if the system is monitored and set up with the service.


System Disarming

Disarming the system takes it out of a secured state and puts it into a Disarmed mode, in which only 24-Hour Zones are able to trigger system alarms. You can only disarm the system while it is in an armed mode. Please note that if you have Armed Home or Armed Night, then an option for Quick Exit will be available. This feature allows a user inside a location that is Armed Home or Armed Night to briefly step outside, for instance, to take out the trash, or to retrieve something from their car. When you press Quick Exit, the system begins the normal Exit Delay countdown. During this time, any Entry/Exit door can be opened without causing an alarm. As long as the door is secured again before the countdown expires, the system will return to its prior arming state at the end of the countdown. This prevents the user from having to disarm, then arm again.


In Arm Away mode, the only available option is to Disarm.


To disarm the system, you must have a valid code. This can be a regular user code, or the Master Code. Click the Disarm button to pull-up a numeric digital keypad. Then enter the valid code into the digital keypad. The system will disarm. Don't forget that if you need to disarm a different partition than the one displayed on the screen, then you should first select that partition from the dropdown menu and provide a user code with authority for the selected partition. This dropdown menu will only be present if multiple partitions are set up on the system.

Please note that you can also disarm the system via Total Connect 2.0 if the system is monitored and set up with the service.


Adding a Zone

To add a zone to a ProSeries Panel, you must have access to end-user programming. Otherwise, all zone programming is completed remotely by your monitoring company. To access the system's auto-enrollment mode, start from the main screen and click the small menu button (three horizontal bars) at the bottom of the home screen, and then choose Tools, enter the Installer Code (default 4112), and then choose Programming, and then choose Peripherals, and then press the + button at the top of the screen to put the system into its auto-enrollment mode.


With the system in this mode, you can then fault (activate) a sensor to get it to auto-enroll. You will be taken to the Edit Sensor screen where you can configure the zone settings. The following programming fields are available:

  • Sensor Type: Set automatically during auto-enrollment. This is the model of sensor that was enrolled (e.g. SIX-Contact, SIX-Motion, etc.)
  • MAC: Set automatically during auto-enrollment. This serves as a Serial Number identifier for PROSIX and SiX Sensors. Please note that if you enroll a legacy sensor using the PROTAKEOVER Module, then this will instead be a Serial Number or a Sensor DL ID Field.
  • Partition: Allows you to assign the sensor to a specific system partition. Only enabled partitions can be selected.
  • Service (with grey background): Available on certain types of SiX and PROSIX Sensors. Allows you to add an additional (secondary) function for the sensor. An example is adding support for an external NC Contact that is wired into a PROSIXCT or SiXCT terminals when its primary function is the Reed Switch.
  • Zone Number: Cannot be changed. Shows which Zone Number the sensor is being assigned. Remember that the system supports (127) encrypted PROSIX and SiX zones, plus (123) non-encrypted legacy zones, for a total of (250) zones.
  • Service (with white background): Available on certain types of PROSIX and SiX Sensors. This allows you to set the primary function for the sensor. An example would be choosing between the Reed Switch function and the External Contact function on a PROSIXCT or SiXCT. If the Reed Switch is the primary function, the Contact Terminals would then be the secondary function.
  • Zone Descriptors (1 & 2): Used for naming the zone. The ProSeries Panel will speak the Zone Descriptors, plus the Device Type, when the sensor is faulted. For example, if you have Zone Descriptor 1 set as "East", Zone Descriptor 2 set as "Door" and Device Type as Door, then the panel will speak "East Door Door" when the sensor is faulted. In this case, Zone Descriptor 2 is unnecessary. Please note that you do not technically need to provide any Zone Descriptors for the zone. You can leave one or both of the fields blank. Many users will just program Zone Descriptor 1 and leave Zone Descriptor 2 blank. If you leave both of them blank, then the zone will only be known as whatever is set for Device Type.
  • Device Type: This is used to set the type of sensor you are adding (e.g. Door, Window, Flood, etc.) Along with the Zone Descriptors, the Device Type is spoken by the panel when voice annunciation is enabled and the sensor is faulted. Depending on the Device Type you choose, only certain types of Response Types will be available. If you want access to a certain Response Type that isn't available for the sensor's normal Device Type, then you may consider setting the Device Type to "Other", which will result in all Response Types being available. Please note that if you set the Device Type to "Other", then it will not be spoken when the sensor is faulted and voice annunciation is enabled. For example, if you had Zone Descriptor 1 set as "East" and Zone Descriptor 2 set as "Bedroom" and the Device Type set as "Other", then the panel would only speak "East Bedroom". Available Device Types include Door, Window, Garage Door, Other, Police, Environmental, Glassbreak, Flood, Medical, Motion Sensor, and Temperature.
  • Response Type: This option determines what action the system will take when the sensor is faulted or activated. Depending on the Device Type you set, only certain Response Type options will be available. If you want to choose from every available Response Type, set the Device Type to "Other", and you will have a complete selection of possible Response Types. Available Response Types include: Not Used, Entry Exit 1, Entry Exit 2, Perimeter, Interior Follower, Day/Night, 24 Hour Silent, 24 Hour Audible, 24 Hour Auxiliary, Interior Delay, Monitor, Trouble, Arm Stay, Arm Away, Disarm, No Response, Silent Burglary, Garage, Garage Monitor, and Local Alarm.
  • Supervised: Toggle ON or OFF. When Supervised is ON, the system will expect the sensor to check-in periodically to ensure that it is working properly. If Supervised is ON, and the sensor fails to check in (due to environment or range issues, the unit being powered down, or having a dead battery, or the device having been removed), then the system will display a trouble condition to alert the user.
  • Alarm Report: Toggle ON or OFF. When Alarm Report is ON, the system will report to AlarmNet when the zone causes an alarm on the system. AlarmNet then forwards the signals to the user's Central Station. This is assuming that the system is being monitored. If Alarm Report is OFF, then no alarm signal will be sent out if the zone causes an alarm on the system. However, if Total Connect 2.0 is enabled for the user, an email or text notification can still be sent.
  • Version: Cannot be changed. Shows the firmware version of the programmed sensor.
  • Chime: This is the sound the panel will make when the sensor is faulted. Choose from a variety of Chime options, or set to Disabled to turn OFF the chime for the zone.
  • Armed Night: Only available if a Device Type of Motion Sensor is selected. Toggle option for ON and OFF. If Armed Night is ON, then the sensor will remain active when the system is set to Armed Night mode, as opposed to being automatically bypassed as an interior sensor. Please note that you must have at least one programmed motion sensor with Armed Night turned ON in order for the Arm Night option to be selectable from the arming screen.
  • Supervision Time: Cannot be adjusted from this screen. If a sensor fails to check in with the system for longer than this period of time, the system will put that sensor into a Trouble or Check condition. The panel is literally telling you to check on that sensor.


When you are finished adjusting the zone settings, choose either Save or Save & Add Another to save the change. If you choose Save, then you will be taken to the Peripherals List. If you choose Save & Add Another, then you will be taken back to the Add a Peripheral Screen so you can enroll another sensor. You can edit the zone settings later by selecting the sensor within the Peripherals List.


Deleting a Zone

If you need to delete an existing zone, start from the main screen of the system, and click the menu button (three horizontal bars) at the bottom of the screen. Then choose Tools, and enter the system's Installer Code (default 4112). Then choose Programming, followed by Peripherals. This will access the Peripherals List. Find the zone you want to delete and check the box on the right-hand side. If you are deleting multiple zones, then check the box for each zone you want to delete. With all the necessary boxes checked, click the black "Delete" button in the upper-right corner. The system will ask you to confirm. Choose Delete on the right-hand side to confirm that you want to delete the sensor(s).


Adding a Z-Wave Device

You can only add a Z-Wave device if there is a PROWIFIZW Module inside of the ProSeries Panel. The PROA7PLUS and PROA7PLUSC have this module included out of the box, but it must be added separately to the PROA7 and PROA7C. When you add a Z-Wave device to the system it can then be controlled both locally at the panel and remotely from Total Connect 2.0 if the system is monitored with a plan that includes automation services. You can also include Z-Wave devices with smart scenes so that they activate automatically based on a set schedule or with predetermined system events.

To add a Z-Wave device, start from the main screen of the system, choose the menu button at the bottom (the three horizontal bars), followed by Tools. Enter the Installer Code for the system (default 4112). Choose Programming, and then Z-Wave Peripherals. It is advised that you clear (Exclude) the device from the panel first to wipe out any residual Z-Wave network data. You can do this even if the Z-Wave device in question is not enrolled with a Z-Wave controller. Many Z-Wave devices will have residual Z-Wave network data left over from the factory, so "excluding" first is almost always a good idea. Choose Exclusion Mode to put the panel into a mode for clearing Z-Wave devices. Then activate the inclusion/exclusion function on your Z-Wave device. There may be a button on the Z-Wave device for this purpose, or you may need to enter a specific programming code. Refer to the manual for your Z-Wave device for more information. The panel should show a device as excluded. Press done after the device has been excluded. Then choose Inclusion Mode to put the panel into a mode for adding Z-Wave devices. Activate the inclusion/exclusion function for the Z-Wave device again. This may be the same function you used when clearing the device from the network. The panel should show that a Z-Wave device was added. Press the done button when finished.


Deleting a Z-Wave Device

Deleting a Z-Wave device will clear it from the network so that it is no longer paired with the ProSeries Panel. You can then pair the Z-Wave device with a new Z-Wave network. Please note that deleting a Z-Wave device may also be referred to as clearing the device or excluding the device. Z-Wave devices are typically cleared from the network before pairing to ensure that any remaining Z-Wave network data is properly wiped out.

To delete a Z-Wave device, begin from the home screen of the panel, select the menu button at the bottom (the three horizontal bars), and then press Tools. Provide the Installer code for the system (default 4112). Select Programming, and then Z-Wave Peripherals. Choose Exclusion Mode to put the system into a mode for clearing Z-Wave devices. From there, activate the Inclusion/Exclusion function on the Z-Wave device. This process will vary depending upon the Z-Wave device in question. It may have an inclusion/exclusion button, or there may be a different process. Check the manual for the Z-Wave device to find out for sure. The panel should show that a device has been cleared from the network.


Changing the Master Code

A ProSeries Panel will have a default Master Code of 1234. You will want to change this code for security purposes. Choose a different code that is easy for you to remember, but difficult for someone else to guess. To begin, start from the main screen of the panel. Click the menu button (the three horizontal bars), and then choose Settings. Select User Management. Then provide either the Master Code (default 1234) or the Installer Code (default 4112) for the system. This will allow you to access the Users Menu.

Click on the Master option from within the user list. This will take you to the Master User settings screen. Find the field for pin, and click the pencil icon on the right-hand side of that field. You will be asked to provide a new pin. Be sure the 4-digit code you enter is unique within the system. Enter the desired pin code. Then confirm that pin code by entering it a second time. Then press Save in the upper-right corner. You will be asked to enter the Master Pin to save. You should enter the EXISTING Master Code at the screen. If you are changing the code from the default of 1234, then you will enter in that 1234 default, and not the new code that you changed the Master Code to. After you enter the existing Master Code, the change will be saved and applied. The Installer Code can be used to get into this programming area, but it cannot be used in the final step, the existing Master Code must be known in order to change it.


Adding a User

There are (96) user slots available on the ProSeries Panels. When you add a new user code, you will be able to use that code for arming and disarming. To get started, click the Menu button (the three horizontal bars) at the bottom on the home screen of the panel, and then choose Settings, followed by User Management. Provide either the Master Code (default 1234) or the Installer Code (default 4112) to gain access to User Management. Click the + icon in the upper-right corner to begin adding a user. You will then provide a name for the user. After you save the name, you will be taken to a settings screen for that user. Make sure to provide and confirm a pin code for the user. Then at the bottom, you will need to set which partition(s) the user has access to. Make sure to set the partition access, or else the user code will not have any authority. In fact, the system will not let you add a code until you have set both a pin code and access authority. You can also set options for Bluetooth Disarming and Z-Wave Lock Control at this time, or you can save that for later. When you are finished, press Add in the upper-right corner. You will be asked to provide a pin to confirm the adding of the new user. Enter in the system's Master Code (default 1234). The Installer Code will not work for this. The new user will be added to the Users List. If you click on the user name, then you can edit its settings.


Deleting a User

After you delete a user, that code will no longer be able to disarm the system. To delete a code, you must access the User Management Menu. Begin from the main screen of the system. Click the three horizontal bars menu button at the bottom of the screen. Choose Settings, followed by User Management. Provide either the Master Code (default 1234) or the Installer Code (default 4112) to gain access. You will enter the User Management Menu. Find the user that you want to delete, and click the checkmark box on the right-hand side of that user. You can also delete multiple users at once by checking the box for every user you want to delete. Once you have selected the user(s), press the Delete button in the upper-right corner. You will be asked to provide the Master Code to confirm deletion. After entering the code, the user(s) you had selected will be deleted. Those user slots will be opened and available for assigning new codes.


Bluetooth Disarming

Automatic Bluetooth Disarming will allow the system to disarm from Armed Away mode automatically upon detecting a paired Bluetooth-compatible phone. Up to six (6) Bluetooth-compatible phones can be set up with this feature. Each of the 6 phones must be associated with a different user. The Master User can also be set up with a Bluetooth Phone for automatic disarming. A phone will only be able to disarm the system if it is removed from the area before the system is fully armed. If the Exit Delay countdown expires and the phone is still detected in the area, then it will be disabled and ignored for that arming session and unable to disarm the system. This prevents the system from disarming immediately due to someone forgetting their phone and accidentally leaving it behind. The feature will go into effect, and the system will immediately disarm upon the user faulting an Entry/Exit Zone with the phone properly connected across Bluetooth. You must set up the feature before it can be used. The feature is completely optional, and it can be turned OFF at any time.

You set up the Bluetooth Disarming feature within the User Management Menu. Begin from the main screen of the system. Click the three horizontal bars menu button at the bottom of the screen. Click Settings, followed by User Management. Provide either the Master Code (default 1234) or the Installer Code (default 4112). Click on the user you want to set up for Automatic Bluetooth Disarming. Then choose the field for Disarm With Bluetooth. At this time, you should activate Bluetooth pairing mode for the phone that is being paired. Press the blue Pair button in the top-right corner of the ProSeries Panel. On the phone, find the ProSeries Panel and click on it. The panel and the phone will both display pairing messages and a pairing key. Click pair on both devices to complete the pairing process. When you back out to the user settings screen, make sure to press Save in the upper-right corner. If you are saving the Master User, then you will be asked to provide its code for confirmation.



Partitions

If you are unfamiliar with security system partitions in general, please read this FAQ. Basically, partitions allow you to "section-off" your alarm system so that certain sections (partitions) of the system can be armed or disarmed, while the other sections (partitions) remain in their current armed or disarmed state. Up to four (4) partitions can be configured on a ProSeries Panel. By default, only the first partition is enabled. Partition 2, Partition 3, and Partition 4 will only be used and in effect after they have been added. You need to first access the partition settings menu. Begin from the main screen of the ProSeries Panel. Click the three (3) horizontal bars menu button at the bottom. Then choose Tools, and enter the system's Installer Code (default 4112). Click Programming, followed by Partitions. The list of enabled partitions will be shown on the screen. To add a new partition, click the + icon in the upper-right. You will then be able to configure various settings for the partition. These are mostly arming settings that you should configure as needed based upon how the system is being used. You want to set Entry/Exit Delays to proper settings so that no false alarms occur on the system. When you are finished, press Save in the top-right. If you ever need to delete a partition, you can access the Partitions Menu, click on the checkmark box on the right-hand side of any partition that is being deleted to select it, and then press Delete in the top-right. Please note that you cannot delete the main Partition, which is Partition 1.


Whenever you are at the main screen of the system, you can set which partition you want to control. There will be a dropdown menu you can click on to choose a different partition to switch to. Whenever you go to switch partitions, you must provide a code with access to that partition. You can also provide the Master Code which has global authority and access to any system partition. Note that only enabled partitions will be present.


Advanced Settings

The Advanced Settings Menu is a deep-level programming menu that includes sub-categories for Communicator, System, and Reporter. Many of these options are fairly complex, and it is suggested that you not change them unless instructed by your monitoring provider, or you are formally trained in alarm systems and you know what you are doing. To access this menu, begin from the main screen of the system. Click the three horizontal bars menu button at the bottom. Press the Tools option. Provide the system's Installer Code (default 4112). Choose Programming. Then choose Advanced Settings. You will then be in the Advanced Settings Menu to make system changes. Once finished, press the Save button in the top-right to save any changes you have made.


Miscellaneous Settings

This section will very briefly cover other settings that haven't been covered earlier in this cheatsheet. This includes setting the WIFI network for the panel. To access the Settings Menu, begin from the main screen of the system. Click the three horizontal bars menu button at the bottom. Then choose Settings. You will have options for WI-FI, User Management, and Secondary Keypad. You may be asked to provide the Master Code (default 1234) or Installer Code (default 4112) before configuring these settings.


Please note that you can also configure settings for Backlight Timeout, Voice, Chime, Brightness, Volume, and Screen Cleaning right from the main screen. Just click or drag down the bar from the top of the system's home screen to access the primary settings. No access code is needed!


Total Connect 2.0

Total Connect 2.0 is the interactive security notification and automation platform used with the ProSeries Alarm Panels. You can access Total Connect 2.0 remotely using a web browser or by using the free Total Connect 2.0 Mobile App that you can download from the Google Play Store or Apple App Store. Your system must have some type of monthly monitoring plan to be used with Total Connect 2.0. Your monitoring company will help you get started with the Total Connect 2.0 service, usually by sending you a Total Connect 2.0 activation email after you are activated for alarm monitoring service. You will need to create a username and password for logging into Total Connect 2.0. For Alarm Grid customers, your username will typically be the email address associated with the monitored account. You can use Total Connect 2.0 to arm and disarm the system, check its current status, control programmed Z-Wave devices, and more!



Conclusion

We hope that you found this Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS Cheatsheet to be useful! We want you to get the very most out of your Resideo Alarm System. And keep in mind that this post may be updated in the future to include new information. It's very likely that Resideo will be updating the ProSeries Panels in the future to include new features and functions, and we will make sure to provide you with the resources you need to take advantage of whatever is offered. Also, if there's anything else that YOU would like to see included in this cheatsheet, please leave a comment down below, and we just might add it in. This is a living, breathing document, and we will likely update it as we learn more. And stay tuned to the Alarm Grid Blog for more great content coming soon!

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If you are familiar with ISC West in any capacity, then you know that the 2021 edition certainly won't be be like any of the previous tradeshows. In a post-COVID world, it's fair to expect some new policies to be put into place. And ISC West is no exception. Get ready for sweeping changes.

For those who haven't been keeping up with the news, the 2020 edition of ISC West was pretty much non-existent. While it's true there was a virtual-only event, we really didn't get much out of it. Manufacturers didn't seem excited about the virtual-only event either. And when we checked it out, there really wasn't much we could cover. ISC West has always been recognized as an iconic Las Vegas event, and it just didn't adapt well to the virtual format.

But for 2021, ISC West is being marketed as a "hybrid" event. Basically, it means that the show will go on in Las Vegas, but with some strict guidelines in place. Sure, there will be some online content to cater to those who refuse to attend a massive public gathering, as well as those who can't afford to put their personal health into jeopardy. But if the all-virtual 2020 ISC West was any indication, I wouldn't expect the "virtual" offerings to light the world on fire. ISC West is about the Vegas experience. It's about the manufacturers putting their best stuff forward and offering an interactive in-person event. And while there will inevitably be some policies meant to protect everyone involved, the fact is that this will probably be the largest security conference since ISC East 2019.

First and foremost, we should applaud the folks at ISC West for even attempting a conference like this in 2021. No, this ISC West definitely won't look or feel like the previous gatherings from 2019 and earlier. Some people will stay home. Almost everyone will be more on their toes. Nobody knows truly what to expect out of a global tradeshow in a post-pandemic world. But that hasn't stopped the organizers from trying.

And so, for ISC West 2021, being held at the Sands Exposition and Convention Center from July 19 thru 21, some guidelines have been released. We can't say that we're surprised, but having seen the chaos and crowds associated with previous editions, we can't even begin to picture what ISC West 2021 will look like. The one thing working in this event's favor is that some otherwise annual attendees will undoubtedly opt-out, stay home, and try to get the most out of whatever virtual offerings are available.

But for those who are willing to put on a brave face (and facemask) for attending the largest gathering of who's who in the security industry, here are the guidelines put out by ISC. And we will say right away, we expect these policies to be very strictly enforced. ISC West is put on by some of the smartest guys and gals in the room. They wouldn't risk the health and safety of the security industry leaders if they didn't think they could do it properly. So while the event has already been pushed back from its original March 23 thru 26 schedule, here's what will be in store for the July 19 thru 21 affair.

  • Facemasks: Required. This should come as absolutely no surprise. Facemasks will be mandatory for everyone on the ISC West floor. This applies to everyone - all attendees, vendors, manufacturers, hosts, no exceptions. Furthermore, ISC West is not allowing any face coverings with valves, bandanas, neck gaiters, or masks of "unpermitted" materials. ISC also specifically outlaws "mesh materials", face coverings with holes, significantly damaged face coverings, and "costume" masks. At a minimum, face coverings must fit properly and snugly, and they must fully cover a person's nose and mouth, and secure under the chin. You can review the ISC West Face Covering Guidelines in full detail here.
  • Temperature Screenings: Mandatory. You aren't getting on the floor without a temperature screening. And if you register above 100.4°F, then sorry, you will be turned away. Again, this isn't a surprise. We're talking about a group of individuals putting out the latest and most advanced security equipment that mankind has to offer. Somewhere along the way, we picked up a few thermometers as well. People will be screened, and people who have a fever won't be permitted inside. It might be wise to pack a small personal thermometer in your luggage to take your own temperature before trying to enter. And if you don't feel well, then please, don't risk it for everyone else. We know ISC West is exciting, but there has to be a cut-off point. And that cut-off is 100.4°F.
  • Enhanced Sanitation: Reed Exhibitions, the group organizing ISC West, is working to enhance the sanitation standards for ISC West 2021. Attendees are being asked to remain responsible for their own hygiene and cleanliness. Reed Exhibitions recommends that everyone washes their hands for at least twenty (20) seconds at a time with soap and warm water. This should be done frequently. Wash your hands. Use sanitizer. The new normal.
  • Physical Distancing: You have likely heard of social distancing by now, and this is strikingly similar. Reed Exhibitions has adjusted the show's "layout", and exhibitors are being required to "promote physical distancing". Attendees are being asked to maintain a physical distance of at least six (6) feet between each other. As someone who attended a pre-COVID ISC West, this is the hardest guideline for me to picture. Personal space was a precious commodity at previous gatherings, and you had to accept being in the close quarters of others. How exactly "physical distancing" will go down at ISC West 2021 is tough for me to imagine personally. Just try your best to keep your distance, and if someone says you're too close, politely respect their wishes and back up. It's for health and safety.
  • Distance Marking & Signage: To promote the physical distancing requirements, Reed Exhibitions is putting up floor and distance markings. Additionally, "operational adjustments" may occur throughout the event (aka, on the fly) as needed to "ensure the health and safety of all attendees". This is a nice way of saying, expect the unexpected, and that the rules may change at any time. If you've seen those "six feet" distance markers at a department store, it will likely look similar at ISC West. Again, this is in the best interest of everyone involved. Do your best to keep a distance and protect the safety of yourself and others.
  • Hands-Free Greetings: Another policy that should come as no surprise. Don't shake hands. Don't hug. Don't even fist bump. Hands off! Just smile and wave, from six or more feet away.
  • Registration is Open: That's right, you too can get on board for the adventure that will be ISC West 2021. It's certainly going to be like nothing we have ever seen before. And believe me, none of these rules and guidelines are meant to scare anyone. If you have a normal, healthy immune system, then you should feel completely safe and comfortable at ISC West 2021. Like I mentioned earlier, the brightest minds from the security industry are coming forth to put on this incredible, once-a-year event. Just keep your distance (and your facemask on), and everything will be fine.
  • Summer Time: Okay, this is my own personal addition, but you may have noticed the event is in July, which is one of the hottest months in the Northern Hemisphere (which is where the United States happens to be located). And you may also notice that Las Vegas, NV is a literal desert. Yes, the event will be inside in an air-conditioned building. But I can tell you now, this will be a hotter ISC West than previous years. This isn't a springtime affair. This is in the dog days of summer, in the desert. Be careful with your health, and try not to get caught outside for an extended period. It's hot out there, and we don't want anyone suffering from heat stroke. Plan accordingly, stay inside when possible, and stay hydrated.

ISC West is quickly approaching! In less than three (3) months all the (brave) faces of the security world will be coming together to try to bring back some semblance of normalcy. Yes, it will be different, but together we can make it a success. Share your thoughts in a comment down below. We'll see you in July. And remember to stay tuned to the Alarm Grid Blog for updates until then. Despite all of the rules, safety guidelines, and important regulations, it's still the biggest and brightest convention of the year! It's okay to get a little hyped and excited. We're looking forward to it, and you should too. Until then, stay safe, stay clean, and practice your best socially distant greetings. Let's all get ready for the safest ISC West ever!

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You may have noticed recently that some new products from Resideo (formerly Honeywell) are being offered in both Resideo and Honeywell Home variants. Today, we want to clear up any confusion and explain that these are the same products, only with different labeling across the front.


To be clear, there have been three (3) instances of this varied labeling thus far, and it's likely that Resideo will continue this practice for additional products in the future. So far, the products that have been offered in both "Resideo" and "Honeywell Home" variants have included the following:

If you have a keen eye, then you'll likely notice that the "Honeywell Home" variants have the base SKU, while the "Resideo" variants have the base SKU, plus the letter C at the end. The C stands for "Commercial", as Resideo is marketing the "Resideo" variants for commercial use, while the "Honeywell Home" variant is being marketed for residential use. This situation occurred because certain alarm dealers who install in predominantly commercial locations couldn't (or in some cases, refused to) sell a product with the word "Home" on the front. In turn, Resideo made the call to accommodate these dealers.

In each of the three (3) aforementioned cases, Resideo has basically released the same product twice, with one variant being sold under the "Honeywell Home" banner for residential use, and the other being sold under the "Resideo" banner for commercial use. The only difference between variants is that one will say "Honeywell Home" across the front, and the other will say "Resideo" across the front. That's the only difference! All other aspects, such as product features, functions, compatibility, and overall use and performance is completely identical. We promise you, there is no gimmick or surprise here. Whether you get a Honeywell Home variant or a Resideo variant, it really won't matter. They're the same!

In fact, the "Residential" vs. "Commercial" wording is nothing more than a cosmetic difference. If you are buying the product for use in a home, but you like the name "Resideo" more than "Honeywell Home", then feel free to get the Resideo variant. It may be marketed for commercial use, but you can absolutely use it in a residential location. Again, the only difference is the wording. Conversely, you will have no trouble using a "Honeywell Home" variant in a commercial business or industrial location. If you prefer the "Honeywell Home" wording, then get that variant for your office or business. Just because it's marketed for residential use does not mean that you cannot use it in a commercial location!


If you're like many users, then you are likely going to wonder why Resideo would even bother doing this. Again, it's really just marketing and their response to a certain subset of commercial dealers. Resideo has the right to use Honeywell Home branding, and they will continue doing so for name recognition. But they found out that commercial and industrial locations don't want to use products labeled "Honeywell Home" because they look out of place. As a result, Resideo is offering the "Resideo"-labeled alternative to accommodate these users. You might think it's a bit silly - and maybe it is. But it's nothing more than a marketing decision. So go ahead and laugh, then decide whether you want your brand-new security system or touchscreen keypad to read "Honeywell Home" or "Resideo". Either way, you're getting a great product.

And that's really the best news here. All three (3) of these products are awesome. Resideo has really been putting out some sleek and fresh-looking security equipment lately. The three (3) products in question are known for their 7-inch touchscreen controllers and their modern designs that look tremendous in pretty much any home or office. And even if the reasoning is a bit frivolous, the end result is that you have more options to choose from. If you don't want "Home" displayed on your new office security system, then you can opt for the "Resideo" option. Alternatively, if you think "Resideo" sounds goofy and makes you cringe, then you can go with "Honeywell Home" instead. There's no judgment here!

What do you think of this "Resideo" vs. "Honeywell Home" situation? Do you think it's a bit silly, or do you think it's a smart decision by Resideo? Also, which name do you like more? And lastly, have you gotten to try out the new Tuxedo Keypad or the ProSeries 7-Inch Panels yet? Please share your thoughts in the comments below. We used the Honeywell Home variants for our personal office testing, but we're sure the Resideo ones are just as nice. Maybe we'll have both variants hanging around the Alarm Grid office someday. But for now, we hope that this cleared up any confusion or misunderstandings, and we'll be back with more news soon.

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Here at Alarm Grid, we try to help as many people as possible with their alarm system. Sure, we hope it will lead folks to choose us for their alarm monitoring needs. But it's also because we're simply helpful people. An alarm in your home or business should help quell fears, not cause them.

We've begun what I think of as "Silly Season". You may be familiar with this term from Nascar, but for us in the alarm industry, this is the time when a lot of home buying and selling occurs. During this time, we get a lot of calls that go something like this, "I just moved into a home with an existing alarm. We haven't been using it, but somehow it got armed, and now it's going off, and I don't know the code to disarm it. Please help!"

Moving into a new home is exciting, but it's also stressful and can be overwhelming at times. So, I've (Ms. Manners) put together this guide to help you, the person who moved out of the home in this scenario, to leave behind your alarm system in a way that's as stress-free as possible for all parties involved.

Ms. Manners Says: Notify Your Alarm Company

If your alarm system is monitored, be sure to notify your alarm company that you are moving out and that the system is staying behind. This may seem obvious, but many people assume that if they stop paying their monitoring fees, the alarm company will know they no longer want service and will cancel it on their own. This is not the case for a number of reasons! There may be contracts involved. There could be liability issues. So for many reasons - not the least of which is it's the polite thing to do - any time you wish to stop monitoring service to a particular address, you should notify the alarm monitoring company as soon as possible.

By notifying the alarm company, you do several things. You give them an opportunity to reach out to the new homeowner and introduce themselves. Hopefully, if you've had a good experience with your monitoring company, you will also put in a good word about them to the new homeowner. Both of these things give the company a leg-up when it comes to courting a potential new customer, and it also gives the new homeowner information based on your real-life experience, not just an advertisement in a new homeowner's mailer.

By notifying the monitoring company, you can also help to prevent any unnecessary dispatching of the authorities to this address. As bad as the scenario above is for the poor, uninformed new homeowner, it's worse for the police, fire, or EMS personnel who may respond to the alarm, which we know is false.

Remember, the person who signed up for the monitoring service at the address in the scenario above no longer lives there. That means the monitoring station is going to be calling people who have no idea what may be going on at this address (which is also an annoyance for the person receiving the call). In this situation, it is likely that the monitoring station MUST dispatch because if they don't (and there is some type of emergency) there may be repercussions for them. A monitoring station is always going to adhere to the adage, "Better safe than sorry." After all, safety is their business.

Ms. Manners Says: Default Users, But Not Zones

When you sell a house and the alarm system with it, you may think it's a good idea to set the alarm system back to factory default to allow the new homeowner a chance to program it as they see fit. Resist this urge! In most cases, what was your Front Door is now going to be their Front Door. What was your Kitchen Window is now going to be their Kitchen Window. John's Bedroom Window may become Jane's Bedroom Window, but this is a pretty simple thing to change and doesn't really call for the entire system to be set back to factory default.

When it comes to user codes, though, it is best to set these back to factory defaults. This will prevent the new homeowner from finding out what codes you used. After all, we are creatures of habit, and there's a good chance you'll use those same codes in your next system. Also, if you set the codes for the Installer and Master users back to their default, the new homeowner should easily be able to find out what they are by doing a quick search online. Then, if they find themselves in the messy scenario discussed above, they'll be able to get themselves out of it. Being able to get yourself out of a jam like this one can do wonders for your self-confidence.

System Manufacturers and their Default Codes

Panel Manufacturer Installer Code Master Code
Honeywell Vista (Non-polling) 4112 1234
Honeywell All-in-One 4112 1234
2GIG GC2 1561 1111
2GIG GC3 1561 1111
Qolsys 1111 1234
Interlogix Simon XT 4321 1234
Interlogix Simon XTi & XTi-5 4321 1234
DSC Impassa 5555 1234

Use the information in the table above to set the codes in your panel back to their default values. If you don't see your panel listed, you can likely find the information you need with a quick online search. Performing this process is the single most helpful thing you can do for the new homeowner when it comes to the alarm system!

Ms. Manners Says: Leave Behind Good Notes

Any information you know about your alarm system, such as the manufacturer and model, the default installer code, and the default master code - each of which hopefully you have programmed into your panel by this time - will be helpful for the new homeowner. A list of zone numbers and their descriptions is also very much appreciated by a new homeowner. Leave them a note, tucked behind the keypad, or on a kitchen counter. Give them the sequence of keys to enter to disarm the system, or better yet, if you have the opportunity, show it to them, and then leave them a note to back up your demonstration.

If you're willing, leave them your contact information so they can contact you in the event that something unforeseen comes up. This is particularly important if your system is somewhat complex and has multiple home automation features integrated with it. I promise the last thing the new homeowner wants to do is bother you if they can avoid it. Everyone at Alarm Grid has talked with a frantic new homeowner who never even considered contacting the prior homeowner. It's usually something we suggest if we're unable to assist.

Fortunately, in most cases, we are able to assist, and we are happy to do so. This is just one of the many ways we make new friends here at Alarm Grid! I hope that anyone who is preparing to move out of a home and leave behind an alarm system will read this and use these suggestions to prepare.

If you happen to be moving into a home that already has an alarm system, and perhaps the previous homeowner didn't read this post, feel free to reach out to us. We're here Monday - Friday from 9:00 am to 8:00 pm Eastern Time. You can reach us via email, or by calling 888-818-7728.

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One product that we have yet to discuss in great detail is the Honeywell Home PROINDMV Indoor Motion Viewer. This is a very promising accessory for PROA7PLUS users, especially those who are looking for a more affordable alternative to Honeywell IP Cameras and true video surveillance service.


If you are familiar with image sensors, then the Honeywell PROINDMV Indoor Motion Viewer is exactly that, plus a bit more. It is part of the Honeywell Home PROSIX Lineup of wireless sensors, so perhaps PROSIXINDMV would have been a more appropriate name. But nomenclature aside, this is a very handy and useful sensor for anyone with a PROA7PLUS Alarm System, especially if your monitoring plan doesn’t include video surveillance, and you are looking to keep your monitoring costs down.

You can think of the PROINDMV as a PIR motion detection sensor, combined with a video camera. It should basically be treated as an interior motion. If its PIR sensor is triggered while the PROA7PLUS System is Armed Away or Armed Night with the PROINDMV listed as active, the system will go into alarm, and the PROINDMV Camera automatically produces either a 10-second video clip or a still-motion image. The clip or image is made available at the PROA7PLUS Panel under the Camera Log, and it can also be seen on Total Connect 2.0. We expect that an update allowing the image or video clip to be automatically forwarded to the central station will be made available sometime in the not-too-distant future. The PROINDMV will also produce an image or video clip if its PIR is tripped during the Entry Delay Period, but in that case, the image or video clip will be held, and only sent out if the system isn’t disarmed in time and ultimately enters alarm.

The PROINDMV will only capture an image or video clip if it is triggered while the system is Armed Away or Armed Night, or in an Entry Delay Period. At this time, there is no way to request a manual “peek-in” like you can for Honeywell IP Cameras. However, we are hopeful that this feature will be made available in a later update. Anyone with access to Total Connect 2.0 can use at least one (1) PROINDMV. And if your TC2 account includes automation (Alarm Grid Silver Plan or higher), then you will be able to add up to eight (8) PROINVMD devices. Only the ten (10) newest clips or images are available, and they are automatically deleted after thirty (30) days. Images and clips can be sent via IP (WIFI) or cellular.

Overall, we think the Honeywell Home PROINDMV is a great product if you aren’t quite ready to make the leap to full video surveillance with Honeywell IP Cameras and an Alarm Grid Platinum Plan. The video camera records in 10 frames per second (FPS), so it isn’t anything too fancy. But it’s certainly good enough for verifying alarms and identifying suspects in a true break-in event. The PIR sensor covers more than 39 feet by 54 feet, with a 90° detection angle, making it suitable for large rooms in your home or business It even offers Pet Immunity for small animals weighing up to 80 lbs, provided that you follow the mounting guidelines. It will be nice for Resideo to finish making all the features available, as the lack of a “peek-in” is sorely missed. We also eagerly await the ability for clips and images to be automatically forwarded to the central station, as that is very important for alarm verification in certain jurisdictions.

You can purchase the Honeywell Home PROINDMV right now from the Alarm Grid website. Remember, this device only works with the PROA7PLUS ProSeries 7” All-In-One Panel from Resideo and Honeywell Home. We will be sure to keep you updated on this blog as new features for the PROINDMV are made available. We’re sure that Resideo has some great ideas in mind for this device, and looks to be promising sensor. If you have any questions about the PROINDMV Motion Viewer, or if you are interested in alarm monitoring services for access to TC2 so that you can get started with your own PROINDMV, send an email to support@alarmgrid.com. We’re here to check your email from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!
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The security industry is in a peculiar spot as of early 2021. Almost every manufacturer has a major question right now. Today, we thought it would be helpful to take a look at current industry questions and share our thoughts. These are the biggest questions for each security manufacturer.



Resideo: Can the PROA7PLUS regain the trust of DIY users?

The decision by Resideo to initially release the ProSeries 7" All-In-One Panel, also known as the PROA7PLUS, without end user programming is something that we still wholeheartedly disagree with. At the time of this writing in early February, the system still does not support local programming. Many DIY users have already jumped ship and switched to systems that leave them empowered, rather than at the mercy of their monitoring providers.

By all accounts, people love the PROA7PLUS System. It has an extremely attractive design, and it is loaded with great features that help it stand-out in a highly competitive market. But there are more users each and every day who instead choose a different option so that they can perform their own programming. It's funny to think that this same company was once seen as the champion of DIY security systems, as their Honeywell LYNX Touch and Honeywell Lyric Systems definitively proved that an end-user could easily install and program their alarm system on their own and save huge amounts of money.

Resideo says that local end-user programming will eventually be made available for the PROA7PLUS, and we are eagerly awaiting this update. But with an increasing number of users switching to manufacturers who never abandoned the concept in the first place, we have to wonder if it will be too little too late?


Qolsys: Is the IQ Hub a mistake?

When I think about any given company in the security industry, I usually start by considering where they are right now, and also where they are going. For years now, Qolsys has been riding the wave of their IQ Panel 2, and later their IQ Panel 2 Plus. No matter how you slice it, the IQ Panel 2 has been a highly successful security system. So when we first learned about the IQ Hub, which was nearly two and a half years ago, our initial reaction was excitement, followed by us scratching our heads, and then us oddly trying to block it from our memories. You can read more about our predictions regarding the IQ Hub here.

Every clue associated with the IQ Hub suggests that its purpose is to serve as a lower entry point, a "budget" system, if you will, in relation to the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus. And while that's not inherently a bad thing, it's just that we're not really sure if the IQ Panel 2 Plus needs a lower entry point. If there ever was a true "one-size-fits-all" security system, then the IQ Panel 2 Plus might very well be that golden child. Additionally, the IQ Panel 2 has become the very "face" of Qolsys, and the company wouldn't have it any other way. Their premier system is well-known for being sleek, easy to operate, and extremely versatile.

Then you bring in the IQ Hub, and well, from aesthetics alone, it looks like an ugly stepchild. Pair that with the fact that we have now gone two and a half years with no major updates regarding the system, and we're starting to wonder if maybe Qolsys is trying to just sweep this one under the rug and hope we all forget about it? Granted, there was a serious pandemic in the past year, but we haven't even gotten a delay notice. We will give it a few more months before we call this system a total lost cause, but this might be a mistake that never sees the light of day. Or maybe it will make a big splash at a certain security tradeshow in the summer? Crazier things have happened.


2GIG: Is the 2GIG Edge a Hail Mary attempt?

It's no secret that Nortek, the parent company of 2GIG, is going all-in on their 2GIG Edge System. The associated website is bold, and the campaign surrounding the system seems to be far more aggressive than anything we have previously seen out of the company. If we're being honest though, 2GIG seems to be acting a bit wild right now. They're trying very hard to draw up hype for the Edge with "giveaways" and by posting particularly bold quotes from the system's beta testing cycle.

It kind of makes us wonder - why is 2GIG acting with such urgency? Not to mention, they tried to discreetly push back the system's "countdown timer" by a few weeks, as if nobody would notice. Meanwhile, behind closed doors, the company has just axed the only remaining touchscreen keypad option for their current flagship system. And speaking of that current flagship system, the 2GIG GC3e was only released less than two (2) years ago. Now they're already trying to generate hype for a new system?

We still haven't even asked why 2GIG feels the need to be so "artsy" and "revolutionary" with their Edge website. Why not just show us a full image of the panel and list some important features? That would be more helpful than telling us that we have "Reached the Edge", whatever that means. Actually, they're correct. I have reached the edge of my patience.

All of this seems fishy to me. 2GIG is desperate here. And to be fair, the panel looks like it has some great features. There is no reason why the Edge can't be a roaring success. We have always appreciated the exceptional build-quality associated with 2GIG Alarm Panels. And now it looks like 2GIG will finally have an option with all the fancy bells and whistles of their competition. Think a feature-packed system like the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus, but with better build quality. If all goes well, then the Edge should serve 2GIG very well for many years to come. But we also get the vibe that this might be a do or die situation for 2GIG.


DSC: Are the days of DSC Residential Security Systems gone?

When we talk about DSC these days, it's usually for the PowerG Sensors that have become the go-to option for IQ Panel 2 Plus users. The only time a DSC Security System is brought up is if it's a commercial user considering a hardwired DSC PowerSeries NEO or DSC PowerSeries PRO. But while DSC is still highly regarded for its commercial security system offerings, its residential offerings are non-existent.

The DSC Iotega is a total flop of a system, and we can't imagine it ever being relevant. That's really no surprise, as the Iotega basically mirrors the Honeywell Lyric Gateway, which had its own product life cut short due to its poor performance. You will still come across DSC Impassa Systems in the field, and many users opt to upgrade them and extend their useful life. But really, nobody is actively seeking out a brand-new DSC Impassa to build around.

Every time we look at DSC, it just seems like they are inching closer to the likes of Napco and Bosch and becoming exclusively known for their commercial and industrial offerings. Again, it makes sense. Now that both Qolsys and DSC are under the Johnson Controls banner, the divide seems clearer than ever. Qolsys is for residential and small business applications, and DSC is for larger commercial and enterprise applications. Maybe a few of you out there have a fond memory of working on a DSC Impassa System. But we can't picture a new DSC System entering the residential market anytime soon.


Got your own alarm system questions? You can send them to us at support@alarmgrid.com. We're here to check your emails from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. This is also a great email to use if you are wanting to learn more about how you can get started with Alarm Grid monitoring services. We look forward to hearing from you!

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Alarm Grid is now offering a new "alternate" version of the Resideo ProSeries 7" All-In-One Panel. In addition to the existing Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS, Alarm Grid customers now have the option of the new Resideo PROA7PLUSC Security System. Both options are the same, except for one aspect.


Before you get super excited and full of anticipation, we're sorry to spoil the fun. The change really isn't anything too revolutionary. While the Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS reads "Honeywell Home" across the front of the panel, the Resideo PROA7PLUSC instead reads "Resideo" across its front. Yes, other than that small aesthetic change, these are the same alarm panels, with the same features, the same compatibility, and the same performance.

Why did Resideo bother to do this? From what we can tell, it's a marketing decision. They wanted the brand recognition of the "Honeywell Home" namesake, but since businesses may not want to use a product with "Home" in the title, the "Resideo" version is available as well. Indeed, the Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS is officially the "residential" version, while the Resideo PROA7PLUSC is officially the "commercial" version. We know, it's a bit redundant, but ask yourself this - are you really surprised?

You are free to throw caution to the wind of course. If you want to use the "commercial" Resideo PROA7PLUSC with the corporate sticker of "Resideo" boldly adorning the alarm panel that you use in your residence, feel free. Or conversely, if you're a business owner wanting to bring the comfort of "home" into the office, then you're welcome to use the "residential" Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS with the "Honeywell Home" moniker. It really won't make much of a difference, but you can go with whichever option makes you happier.

You may actually recall that Resideo did something similar with the new Tuxedo Keypad for their hardwired Honeywell VISTA Security Systems. In that realm, you can choose between the Honeywell Home TUXEDOW with "Honeywell Home" emblazoned across the front panel, or you can opt for the Resideo TUXEDOWC with "Resideo" taking the spotlight. Again, that is the only difference between the two keypad models. Now Resideo is doing it again with their wireless panels. Will it be the last time they do this? Our bets are on "No", but time will tell.

Anyway, whether you choose the PROA7PLUS or PROA7PLUSC, you are getting a fantastic wireless alarm panel with some outstanding features. We have already covered the system in extensive detail before, so please check out our introduction and buying guide for the system that we put out late last year.

We must also report that local programming is still yet to be released, so you will need your alarm monitoring company to perform virtually all tasks remotely when it comes to setting up the system. Our understanding is that the systems (yes, both of them) will soon be made to support local programming, hopefully in the coming months. We also have no word on when, or even if, Apple HomeKit functionality will become a reality. For now, if you want a panel that does support end-user programming AND offers a robust integration with Apple HomeKit, you might instead consider the Honeywell Lyric Alarm System, which in many ways is still the superior option.

If you have any questions about the Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS, the Resideo PROA7PLUSC, the Honeywell Lyric, or if you just want to learn about alarm monitoring in general, contact our team via email at support@alarmgrid.com. We are here to check your email from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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One of the more interesting things about the Honeywell Home PROSIX Sensor lineup is that it features two (2) different "mini" door and window sensors. These are the Honeywell Home PROSIXMINI and the Honeywell Home PROSIXMINI2. Today, we will be comparing and contrasting these sensors.


When the Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS Alarm Panel first hit the market, a new lineup of sensors also made their debut. These are the Honeywell Home PROSIX Sensors, and they make the perfect complement to Resideo's latest security system. These devices are best-known for their 128-bit AES encryption and their improved wireless range over the Honeywell and Resideo Sensors that came before them. The PROSIX Sensors can only be used with the PROA7PLUS, and until Resideo makes local programming available for the system, you will need the help of your monitoring company to enroll any new sensor.

At first glance, the PROSIX Sensor Family seems pretty straightforward. It is a very robust lineup, featuring everything from security sensors like motion detectors and glassbreak listeners, to environmental sensors like flood sensors and temperature sensors. But there is one anomaly that often makes people turn heads. That is the presence of two (2) different "mini" door and window contact sensors, the PROSIXMINI and the PROSIXMINI2. Both are surface-mounted contact sensors, and both monitor an interior door or window for opening and closing. A third sensor in the lineup, the PROSIXCT also accomplishes the same task, but that sensor is considerably larger and features an auxiliary input to provide wireless transmitter functionality. But it begs the question - why is there both a PROSIXMINI and a PROSIXMINI2?

Starting with the PROSIXMINI, this sensor actually looks virtually identical to the Honeywell SiXMINICT from the Honeywell SiX Series Lineup made popular by the Lyric Controller. It's likely that Resideo took the same plastic casing from the SiXMINICT and repurposed it for the PROSIXMINI. And when compared the alternative option from the same sensor generation, the PROSIXMINI2, the only category where the PROSIXMINI "wins" is in size. The PROSIXMINI (2.44"L x 1.25"W x 0.45"D) is the smaller and more discrete sensor when compared with the larger and slightly bulkier PROSIXMINI2 (2.9"L x 1.15"W x 0.75"D). The reason why the PROSIXMINI is able to maintain a smaller profile and relatively "flat" design is thanks to its use of a CR2450 coin battery. Meanwhile, the PROSIXMINI2 uses a CR2 battery, which has a more traditional, cylindrical shape,

But before you go declaring the PROSIXMINI to be the winner, you might to consider the fact that the PROSIXMINI2 outshines its smaller and flatter competitor in virtually every other possible aspect. The PROSIXMINI2 has a wireless range of 500+ feet in open air, while the PROSIXIMINI is limited to 200+ feet. The PROSIXMINI2 also wins in the battle of battery life, as its lithium CR2 battery should last about seven (7) years before a replacement is needed. The lithium CR2450 battery inside the PROSIXMINI can only be counted on for about five (5) years. Also, some equipment testing has shown that the use of coin cell batteries inside a sensor can be problematic. It's likely that Resideo wanted to give users an alternative option that uses a more trustworthy battery.


Now, you're likely wondering, which sensor should you get? The PROSIXMINI or the PROSIXMINI2? If aesthetics are the single most important concern to you, and you simply want the smallest and most discreet sensor, the you can make a case for the PROSIXMINI. But if you ask us, we think the PROSIXMINI2 is the superior option, because of its improved signal range, extended battery life, and more reliable battery performance in general. But rest assured, both the PROSIXMINI and the PROSIXMINI2 should work very well on any PROA7PLUS Security System.

If you need help deciding on sensors for your system, or if you are an Alarm Grid monitored customer needing us to help you enroll new sensors with your PROA7PLUS, please email us at support@alarmgrid.com. This is also a good email to use if you are interested in starting new monitoring service with Alarm Grid. We're here to check your emails from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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Welcome to the first post of 2021 from Alarm Grid! It's almost cliché to say by this point, but we're just as happy to transition into 2021 as you are. And we're looking to start the year off on the right foot by having our Florida team members return to the Alarm Grid headquarters.


Since Thanksgiving, our Florida office has remained closed, and virtually all team members who normally work here have instead been performing their regular duties from their homes. Only our satellite offices in Kentucky and Connecticut have remained active during this time. Well now it's back to business as usual, as we have transitioned back into our usual location. We are happy to be back, as while we love our homes, the office is really the best place for staying focused and providing our customers with the support and assistance they need.

One other small note as we leave 2020 behind, we know that normally we do a "Year In Review" blog post around this time, to look back on all the events that occurred. But unfortunately, that will not be happening this year. We actually had one planned out, but due to technical difficulties, the content was deleted, and we were unable to recover it. Also, there has been so much security news as of late that we really haven't had the time. Not to mention the fact that most people consider 2020 to have been a "below average" year, so we're sure that most of our readers are ready to move forward rather than look into the rearview. But if you were looking forward to that, then we do apologize.

With that out of the way, let's start thinking about what we can expect for 2021. Our three biggest manufacturers - Resideo, Qolsys, and 2GIG - all have big plans for the year. We expect this to be the year that the Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS Alarm Panel really comes into itself, as Resideo is expected to make local end user programming available for the system, and there is a good chance that Apple HomeKit support will also be added later this year. We've also heard that there will be a "stripped-down" version of the PROA7PLUS called simply the PROA7 that will not offer Z-Wave or WIFI connectivity unless added separately. And there have also been some small rumblings of a wired and wireless hybrid panel from Resideo that is tentatively being called the Honeywell Home PROH8PLUS.

Qolsys is likely going to debut their much-anticipated Qolsys IQ Hub in 2021. We were actually expecting it to hit the market in 2020, but that obviously never happened, possibly due to the ongoing pandemic. We have periodically asked Qolsys about the IQ Hub, and they continue to say that it should be available early this year. All signs point to it being released very soon. As we have mentioned before, we don't necessarily expect the IQ Hub to replace the IQ Panel 2 Plus, and instead it will be an option for users who don't really need all of the advanced features of the company's flagship alarm panel. We strongly recommend checking out this post to learn more about what may be coming for the IQ Hub.

Lastly, 2GIG is set to release their own brand-new security system, the 2GIG Edge, in February. The website promoting the upcoming panel is vague on details and specifications, but we're guessing that 2GIG is going to hold nothing back on their new panel. They have some very stiff competition with Resideo and Qolsys afterall. For more information on what the 2GIG Edge Security System might have to offer, please check out our initial post on the subject, where we made some interesting predictions and speculations based on information that is currently available.

Remember to stay tuned to our blog so that you can remain up-to-date on the latest security news and happening throughout 2021 and beyond. And if you ever need any help with your Alarm Grid System, or if you are looking to join Alarm Grid as a monitored customer, then please email us at support@alarmgrid.com. We're available to check your emails from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. Happy New Year, and we look forward to hearing from you!

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We are thrilled to announce that new Alarm Grid System Kits featuring the Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS System are now available! We have twelve (12) kits in total, split into four (4) main categories, with options available for users in most situations. They're ready for your home or business!


If you aren't familiar with the PROA7PLUS, then we strongly recommend reviewing this introduction post and buying guide, as it will really help you get acquainted with the latest Resideo Security System. For this post, we mainly want to focus on the new kits, so that is what we will do.

Potential buyers should keep in mind that the PROA7PLUS does NOT support local end user programming at this time, though we have received word from Resideo that the feature is coming. And while we do not have a firm answer on Apple HomeKit compatibility, we suspect that HomeKit support will be coming later down the pipeline. Remember that the Honeywell Lyric and its system kits DO support local end user programming and Apple HomeKit, so that can be a really good alternative if you don't want to wait for Resideo to get their system ready.

With that out of the way, here are the kits! Like we said earlier, there are four (4) distinct categories, with three (3) system kit options in each category. Basically, in each category, you are choosing an IP-only option OR a dual-path IP & LTE cellular option with either AT&T OR Verizon. Find the category that makes the most sense for you, and then choose - IP-only, Dual-Path AT&T & IP, or Dual-Path Verizon & IP.

Remember that if you go dual-path, you will need a monitoring plan with cellular connectivity, such as an Alarm Grid Gold or Platinum Level Plan (Self or Full). We always recommend the use of cellular backup, as it is the only way to keep your system connected for monitoring service in the event of an internet outage. But whether you ultimately go with IP-only or dual-path is up to you. As a reference, the cellular communicator options for the PROA7PLUS are the PROLTE-A (AT&T LTE) and the PROLTE-V (Verizon LTE). And make sure that your monitoring plan includes access to Total Connect 2.0 if you want to control the PROA7PLUS System remotely from your phone or a web browser!

The first category we have is our 3-1 PROA7PLUS Kits. These include the PROA7PLUS System, three (3) PROSIXMINI2 Door and Window Sensors, one (1) PROSIXPIR Motion Sensor, and a Honeywell LT-Cable. These are great for smaller homes and apartments where only a few sensors are needed.

Next, we have our 10-1 PROA7PLUS Kits. These include the PROA7PLUS System, ten (10) PROSIXMINI2 Door and Window Sensors, one (1) PROSIXPIR Motion Sensor, and a Honeywell LT-Cable. These are great for larger homes and businesses where many sensors are needed.

Then, we have our Wired Upgrade PROA7PLUS Kits. These include the PROA7PLUS System, a PROSIXC2W Wired to Wireless Converter, and two (2) Honeywell LT-Cables. These are great if you are upgrading to the PROA7PLUS from a wired alarm system, and you want to keep using your existing hardwired sensors.

Last, we have our Wireless Upgrade PROA7PLUS Kits. These include the PROA7PLUS System, a PROTAKEOVER Legacy RF Receiver Module, an a Honeywell LT-Cable. These are great if you are upgrading to the PROA7PLUS from a wireless alarm system, and you want to keep using your existing compatible wireless sensors.

Like always, if you have any questions about compatibility, or if you are interested in signing-up for new monitoring service, then please email us at support@alarmgrid.com. We are here to help you from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you and helping you get started with your new PROA7PLUS Alarm Panel!

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