Resideo Posts

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Alarm Grid is now offering a new "alternate" version of the Resideo ProSeries 7" All-In-One Panel. In addition to the existing Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS, Alarm Grid customers now have the option of the new Resideo PROA7PLUSC Security System. Both options are the same, except for one aspect.


Before you get super excited and full of anticipation, we're sorry to spoil the fun. The change really isn't anything too revolutionary. While the Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS reads "Honeywell Home" across the front of the panel, the Resideo PROA7PLUSC instead reads "Resideo" across its front. Yes, other than that small aesthetic change, these are the same alarm panels, with the same features, the same compatibility, and the same performance.

Why did Resideo bother to do this? From what we can tell, it's a marketing decision. They wanted the brand recognition of the "Honeywell Home" namesake, but since businesses may not want to use a product with "Home" in the title, the "Resideo" version is available as well. Indeed, the Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS is officially the "residential" version, while the Resideo PROA7PLUSC is officially the "commercial" version. We know, it's a bit redundant, but ask yourself this - are you really surprised?

You are free to throw caution to the wind of course. If you want to use the "commercial" Resideo PROA7PLUSC with the corporate sticker of "Resideo" boldly adorning the alarm panel that you use in your residence, feel free. Or conversely, if you're a business owner wanting to bring the comfort of "home" into the office, then you're welcome to use the "residential" Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS with the "Honeywell Home" moniker. It really won't make much of a difference, but you can go with whichever option makes you happier.

You may actually recall that Resideo did something similar with the new Tuxedo Keypad for their hardwired Honeywell VISTA Security Systems. In that realm, you can choose between the Honeywell Home TUXEDOW with "Honeywell Home" emblazoned across the front panel, or you can opt for the Resideo TUXEDOWC with "Resideo" taking the spotlight. Again, that is the only difference between the two keypad models. Now Resideo is doing it again with their wireless panels. Will it be the last time they do this? Our bets are on "No", but time will tell.

Anyway, whether you choose the PROA7PLUS or PROA7PLUSC, you are getting a fantastic wireless alarm panel with some outstanding features. We have already covered the system in extensive detail before, so please check out our introduction and buying guide for the system that we put out late last year.

We must also report that local programming is still yet to be released, so you will need your alarm monitoring company to perform virtually all tasks remotely when it comes to setting up the system. Our understanding is that the systems (yes, both of them) will soon be made to support local programming, hopefully in the coming months. We also have no word on when, or even if, Apple HomeKit functionality will become a reality. For now, if you want a panel that does support end-user programming AND offers a robust integration with Apple HomeKit, you might instead consider the Honeywell Lyric Alarm System, which in many ways is still the superior option.

If you have any questions about the Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS, the Resideo PROA7PLUSC, the Honeywell Lyric, or if you just want to learn about alarm monitoring in general, contact our team via email at support@alarmgrid.com. We are here to check your email from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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We have learned that the Honeywell 5877 Garage Door Relay has been discontinued, effective immediately. This leaves the Honeywell Lyric and the Honeywell LYNX Touch Panels with no viable option for a smart garage door controller. The associated Honeywell GDCK Kit is also discontinued.

The Honeywell 5877 was widely seen as one of the most important automation accessories for the Lyric and LYNX Touch Systems. Thanks to this module, a user could integrate their garage door motor with their wireless Honeywell Alarm System and the Total Connect 2.0 platform. This allowed users to open and close their garage doors from anywhere using TC2, and they could also use the platform to check its current OPEN or CLOSED status when a separate garage door sensor was used. Users could also include their garage doors with smart scenes for automatic operation based on a schedule or with predetermined events.

With the 5877 being discontinued, there is no longer a viable method for setting up a Lyric or LYNX Touch System for local garage door control. The decision by Resideo to discontinue the Honeywell 5877 does not strike us as a big surprise. An increasing number of users have been finding good alternatives to the 5877 lately. One example is the Chamberlain and LiftMaster Integration for Total Connect 2.0. While this server-to-server integration does not allow for local control of the garage door at the security panel, being able to control the garage door remotely from TC2 is considered by most users to be more important. You can learn more about that integration here. The 5877 also has a big limitation, in that it does not work with the increasingly popular LiftMaster MyQ Garage Motors.

It is also important to note that the Lyric and LYNX Touch Systems are not compatible with most third-party Z-Wave garage door openers. This somewhat forced Lyric and LYNX Touch users to go with the first-party 5877 device from Resideo, rather than buying a third-party device that they do not manufacture. But the game has been changed with the newest Resideo System, the Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS. This new system offers a much wider selection of possible integrations. For example, Alarm Grid offers the popular GoControl GD00Z-8-GC Z-Wave Plus Garage Door Opener, which is often used with various Alarm.com Security Panels. That unit works with the PROA7PLUS, but not the Lyric and LYNX Touch Systems. The bottom line is that fewer people were buying the Honeywell 5877, and Resideo decided it was no longer in their best interest to continue manufacturing it.

Of course, the unfortunate result of this is that the Lyric and LYNX Touch Panels do not have a good option for smart garage door control. If you have an existing Honeywell 5877 Module, then it will continue to work fine. Or if you find a used one somewhere, then that should also be okay for setting up new service. The other components of the Honeywell GDCK Kit are still available, including the Honeywell 5822T for monitoring a garage door's current status. But if you were in the market for a new 5877 for an existing Lyric or LYNX Touch, then we are sorry to say that you are out of luck. You should try finding a used model if possible, or you may consider upgrading to a newer alarm system.

This truly represents the end of an era, as the Honeywell 5877 was a mainstay accessory for the longest time. But all good things must come to an end. If you have any questions about the discontinued 5877, or if you need help integrating your alarm system with your garage door, then please email us at support@alarmgrid.com. Being able to control your garage door remotely is a great perk of alarm monitoring service, and we are here to help you explore your remaining options. Our team is here to answer your questions from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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One of the more interesting things about the Honeywell Home PROSIX Sensor lineup is that it features two (2) different "mini" door and window sensors. These are the Honeywell Home PROSIXMINI and the Honeywell Home PROSIXMINI2. Today, we will be comparing and contrasting these sensors.


When the Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS Alarm Panel first hit the market, a new lineup of sensors also made their debut. These are the Honeywell Home PROSIX Sensors, and they make the perfect complement to Resideo's latest security system. These devices are best-known for their 128-bit AES encryption and their improved wireless range over the Honeywell and Resideo Sensors that came before them. The PROSIX Sensors can only be used with the PROA7PLUS, and until Resideo makes local programming available for the system, you will need the help of your monitoring company to enroll any new sensor.

At first glance, the PROSIX Sensor Family seems pretty straightforward. It is a very robust lineup, featuring everything from security sensors like motion detectors and glassbreak listeners, to environmental sensors like flood sensors and temperature sensors. But there is one anomaly that often makes people turn heads. That is the presence of two (2) different "mini" door and window contact sensors, the PROSIXMINI and the PROSIXMINI2. Both are surface-mounted contact sensors, and both monitor an interior door or window for opening and closing. A third sensor in the lineup, the PROSIXCT also accomplishes the same task, but that sensor is considerably larger and features an auxiliary input to provide wireless transmitter functionality. But it begs the question - why is there both a PROSIXMINI and a PROSIXMINI2?

Starting with the PROSIXMINI, this sensor actually looks virtually identical to the Honeywell SiXMINICT from the Honeywell SiX Series Lineup made popular by the Lyric Controller. It's likely that Resideo took the same plastic casing from the SiXMINICT and repurposed it for the PROSIXMINI. And when compared the alternative option from the same sensor generation, the PROSIXMINI2, the only category where the PROSIXMINI "wins" is in size. The PROSIXMINI (2.44"L x 1.25"W x 0.45"D) is the smaller and more discrete sensor when compared with the larger and slightly bulkier PROSIXMINI2 (2.9"L x 1.15"W x 0.75"D). The reason why the PROSIXMINI is able to maintain a smaller profile and relatively "flat" design is thanks to its use of a CR2450 coin battery. Meanwhile, the PROSIXMINI2 uses a CR2 battery, which has a more traditional, cylindrical shape,

But before you go declaring the PROSIXMINI to be the winner, you might to consider the fact that the PROSIXMINI2 outshines its smaller and flatter competitor in virtually every other possible aspect. The PROSIXMINI2 has a wireless range of 500+ feet in open air, while the PROSIXIMINI is limited to 200+ feet. The PROSIXMINI2 also wins in the battle of battery life, as its lithium CR2 battery should last about seven (7) years before a replacement is needed. The lithium CR2450 battery inside the PROSIXMINI can only be counted on for about five (5) years. Also, some equipment testing has shown that the use of coin cell batteries inside a sensor can be problematic. It's likely that Resideo wanted to give users an alternative option that uses a more trustworthy battery.


Now, you're likely wondering, which sensor should you get? The PROSIXMINI or the PROSIXMINI2? If aesthetics are the single most important concern to you, and you simply want the smallest and most discreet sensor, the you can make a case for the PROSIXMINI. But if you ask us, we think the PROSIXMINI2 is the superior option, because of its improved signal range, extended battery life, and more reliable battery performance in general. But rest assured, both the PROSIXMINI and the PROSIXMINI2 should work very well on any PROA7PLUS Security System.

If you need help deciding on sensors for your system, or if you are an Alarm Grid monitored customer needing us to help you enroll new sensors with your PROA7PLUS, please email us at support@alarmgrid.com. This is also a good email to use if you are interested in starting new monitoring service with Alarm Grid. We're here to check your emails from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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If you haven't been keeping an eye on the Alarm Grid YouTube Channel, then you may have missed the two (2) new videos we uploaded last week. It has been awhile since our last video recap, so we wanted to give these a special highlight. We hope to be back in the studio regularly very soon!


Before we focus on the new videos, we have some good news and bad news. The bad news is that it may still be a few more weeks before we are able to really start concentrating on them again and begin putting them out like we used to. Our Florida office is in a state of flux right now behind the scenes, and while this should have no impact on our ability to provide you with top-quality service, it does impact our ability to shoot, edit, and upload new videos. And once we are back doing videos, keep in mind that it may take us another week or two to really "shake off the rust" and get back in the swing of things. We ask for your patience during this time, and we apologize that we haven't been able to give you the new videos that you have come to expect from us.

But the good news is that we expect new videos to return very soon, with all of your favorite faces, and maybe even some new ones at some point in 2021. We know we're off to a bit of a slow start, but we truly believe that this can be the best year yet for the Alarm Grid Video Team. There are some great ideas sitting in the bin, and we're very eager and excited to put them out. We just ask for some patience as we work to get things set up. It won't be long until you're checking out new videos every week to get the most out of your security system!

With that out of the way, let's take a look at the two (2) new videos we have for you today. These are the very first Alarm Grid videos of 2021, and they cover some great topics. We only had time to get Jorge into the Alarm Grid studio, so he's the star of both of these videos. Special thanks to Jorge and our video team for rallying and putting these together. We know that two videos isn't very much, but we hope that these can at least hold you over until we make a full return to the studio and really begin reminding everyone just what our team is capable of accomplishing. But enough stalling. Here are the newest Alarm Grid videos!

Troubleshooting a Lyric Using Apple HomeKit

Jorge provides some troubleshooting tips for a Honeywell Lyric System that is using Apple HomeKit. The HomeKit integration for the Lyric allows you to receive a limited selection of Lyric System Alerts from the HomeKit platform on your iOS device, and perform various system functions using spoken Siri voice commands. To start using the HomeKit integration, your Lyric System must be activated for monitoring service, as HomeKit functionality can only be enabled remotely by your alarm monitoring company. HomeKit service is usually used to supplement Total Connect 2.0, as TC2 provides greater detail regarding system activity and faulted zones than HomeKit.


Entering Programming On a Partitioned IQ Panel 2 Plus

Jorge shows you the differences that occur when you go to enter programming on a Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus system that has partitions enabled, versus one that does not. Alarm system partitions are used to section off a single system into multiple "areas" that can be armed and disarmed independently from one another. When you have partitions enabled on the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus, you are asked to provide a code before you even access the main screen. The code you enter will determine your level of authority. You will only need to provide a code again if your originally entered code lacks the authority to access a particular menu or setting. But if partitions are not enabled, then you won't need to provide a code unless you attempt to access menu options with restricted access, such as the Installation Menu.

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Resideo has confirmed that the Verizon CDMA Sunset date is December 31, 2022. After that date, Verizon CDMA Communicators for security systems will no longer function. You must replace your panel's cellular communicator before that time to avoid any interruptions to your monitoring service.


In an effort to dispel any false rumors and/or misinformation, Resideo is reconfirming the Verizon CDMA Sunset for alarm panels to be at the end of 2022. The reason why Resideo found it necessary to confirm this shutdown date is because most CDMA Communicators for cell phones had a shutdown date to stop working after December 2020. This date was originally set for the end of December 2019, but it was later pushed back to the end of 2020. However, Resideo has a special agreement with Verizon to keep alarm system CDMA Communicators operational until December 31, 2022. Additionally, the largely equivalent AT&T 3G Communicators for alarm systems are set to stop working after January 31, 2022. This is according to a banner posted on the Resideo AlarmNet website.

The big thing to take away here is that nothing has changed. The 3G and CDMA Sunset impacting the security industry is still on-track to occur next year, in 2022. For AT&T 3G Communicators, this will take effect following January 31, 2022. For Verizon CDMA Communicators, the key date is December 31, 2022. In preparation for these dates, any 3G, 4G, or CDMA radio can no longer be activated for monitoring service. If you deactivate these modules for any reason, you will not be able to reactivate them. But if no changes are made, then they should continue to function until their associated shut-off dates.

As a reminder, Alarm Grid is urging anyone still using a 3G, 4G, or CDMA communicator to upgrade to an LTE communicator as soon as possible. We know that it is tempting to wait until the last minute, especially if money is tight. But please understand that many other users are thinking the same thing. There is most likely going to be a mad rush of users trying to upgrade right at the very end. And while we will do our very best to accommodate everyone, we are unfortunately expecting that some users may get left behind, simply because they didn't act to upgrade their communicators soon enough. Don't risk it. Upgrade now, and ensure that your home or business stays protected well into the very distant future.

If you want to learn more about communicator upgrades, including which model to get for your system, and how to access the Alarm Grid Communicator Replacement Portal, then please check out this prior blog post at your earliest convenience. You may also email our team at support@alarmgrid.com if you need further assistance. We're here to help you from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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We are thrilled to announce that new Alarm Grid System Kits featuring the Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS System are now available! We have twelve (12) kits in total, split into four (4) main categories, with options available for users in most situations. They're ready for your home or business!


If you aren't familiar with the PROA7PLUS, then we strongly recommend reviewing this introduction post and buying guide, as it will really help you get acquainted with the latest Resideo Security System. For this post, we mainly want to focus on the new kits, so that is what we will do.

Potential buyers should keep in mind that the PROA7PLUS does NOT support local end user programming at this time, though we have received word from Resideo that the feature is coming. And while we do not have a firm answer on Apple HomeKit compatibility, we suspect that HomeKit support will be coming later down the pipeline. Remember that the Honeywell Lyric and its system kits DO support local end user programming and Apple HomeKit, so that can be a really good alternative if you don't want to wait for Resideo to get their system ready.

With that out of the way, here are the kits! Like we said earlier, there are four (4) distinct categories, with three (3) system kit options in each category. Basically, in each category, you are choosing an IP-only option OR a dual-path IP & LTE cellular option with either AT&T OR Verizon. Find the category that makes the most sense for you, and then choose - IP-only, Dual-Path AT&T & IP, or Dual-Path Verizon & IP.

Remember that if you go dual-path, you will need a monitoring plan with cellular connectivity, such as an Alarm Grid Gold or Platinum Level Plan (Self or Full). We always recommend the use of cellular backup, as it is the only way to keep your system connected for monitoring service in the event of an internet outage. But whether you ultimately go with IP-only or dual-path is up to you. As a reference, the cellular communicator options for the PROA7PLUS are the PROLTE-A (AT&T LTE) and the PROLTE-V (Verizon LTE). And make sure that your monitoring plan includes access to Total Connect 2.0 if you want to control the PROA7PLUS System remotely from your phone or a web browser!

The first category we have is our 3-1 PROA7PLUS Kits. These include the PROA7PLUS System, three (3) PROSIXMINI2 Door and Window Sensors, one (1) PROSIXPIR Motion Sensor, and a Honeywell LT-Cable. These are great for smaller homes and apartments where only a few sensors are needed.

Next, we have our 10-1 PROA7PLUS Kits. These include the PROA7PLUS System, ten (10) PROSIXMINI2 Door and Window Sensors, one (1) PROSIXPIR Motion Sensor, and a Honeywell LT-Cable. These are great for larger homes and businesses where many sensors are needed.

Then, we have our Wired Upgrade PROA7PLUS Kits. These include the PROA7PLUS System, a PROSIXC2W Wired to Wireless Converter, and two (2) Honeywell LT-Cables. These are great if you are upgrading to the PROA7PLUS from a wired alarm system, and you want to keep using your existing hardwired sensors.

Last, we have our Wireless Upgrade PROA7PLUS Kits. These include the PROA7PLUS System, a PROTAKEOVER Legacy RF Receiver Module, an a Honeywell LT-Cable. These are great if you are upgrading to the PROA7PLUS from a wireless alarm system, and you want to keep using your existing compatible wireless sensors.

Like always, if you have any questions about compatibility, or if you are interested in signing-up for new monitoring service, then please email us at support@alarmgrid.com. We are here to help you from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you and helping you get started with your new PROA7PLUS Alarm Panel!

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Resideo has made another big hire, this time bringing Travis Merrill aboard to serve as Executive Vice President, Chief Strategy, and Commercial Officer. Merrill offers more than two decades of experience in corporate strategy, marketing, and general management. Congratulations Merrill!


Merrill will report to Resideo President and CEO Jay Geldmacher, and he will likely be working very closely with other executives and leaders throughout the company. He will oversee the company's corporate strategy, brand strategy, external corporate communications, and strategic partnerships. The hire becomes official on Monday, December 21, 2020.

CEO Geldmacher said of the hire, "Travis has a proven track record and unique expertise in developing strategy and fostering commercial partnerships to drive focus and growth... His leadership and experience will be invaluable as we continue to define the strategic direction for Resideo.”

Prior to being hired by Resideo, Merrill served as CMO of FLIR Systems. He also previously served as the Vice President of Samsung's tablet business in the United States. Merrill currently serves on the board of All Hands Raised, a non-profit group committed to the wellbeing of young people, and also has current affiliations with Wabash College.

"With its presence in more than 150 million homes and businesses and its numerous market-leading products, Resideo has a tremendous opportunity to deliver value for its customers and partners... I am excited to work with this team and our partners to position Resideo for long-term growth," said Merrill on joining the company.

With Merrill set to become the person in-charge of Resideo external corporate communications, our hope is that he will make quick work of securing Apple HomeKit compatibility for the new Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS Alarm Panel, much like what is already available for our current top Resideo Security System pick, the Honeywell Lyric Alarm System. The two biggest items on our wishlist for the PROA7PLUS are end user programming and HomeKit compatibility. It sounds like Merrill needs to sit down with the folks at Apple and make some magic happen. Don't let us down Merrill!

If you are interested in getting started with monitoring service for a Resideo Alarm Panel, then please don't hesitate to reach out to us! The best way to contact our planning team for preparing a new security system is to email support@alarmgrid.com. We will walk you through the process of planning a complete security system from start to finish. Our hours for checking email run from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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Alarm Grid is proud to announce that the Honeywell LTEM-XA and Honeywell LTEM-XV are now available! These are both brand-new cellular communicators for VISTA Systems. They follow the same installation process as the LTE-XA and LTE-XV, which are being phased out in favor of these new models.


What separates the LTEM-XA and the LTEM-XV from their predecessors is that they connect with the advanced LTE Cat M1 networks. These networks allow for stronger security and more effective signal penetration than other LTE cellular networks. The LTEM-XA receives service from the AT&T, while the LTEM-XV is covered by Verizon. As usual, the decision to go with one over the other has nothing to do with your personal phone, and it will have no impact on the cost of your monitoring service.

It should be noted that the older LTE-XA and LTE-XV will still continue to work as intended. Anyone using one of these modules does not need to upgrade to a newer model or replace their existing equipment. In fact, there is very little reason to do so if your system is working as intended. You can confirm that your communicator is receiving a strong cellular signal by checking the Signal LED on the front of the module. A solid green light indicates a strong signal. It's also worth mentioning that the LTE-XA and LTE-XV will continue to remain available for purchase while stock remains of these products. However, there is little reason to buy them, as the LTEM-XA and LTEM-XV are now the recommended models.

One other important note about the LTEM-XA and LTEM-XV is that they offer cellular connectivity only. These are not dual-path communicators, and they do not provide internet connectivity. This is not a huge concern, as LTE Cat M1 service is plenty fast and extremely reliable on its own. But if you do want a dual-path option for your Honeywell VISTA System, then the Honeywell LTE-IA (AT&T LTE & IP) and the Honeywell LTE-IV (Verizon LTE & IP) are still readily available. Just remember that the LTE-IA and the LTE-IV only use "standard" LTE connectivity, as opposed to the LTE Cat M1 service offered by the LTE-XA and LTE-XV. It is currently unknown if Resideo will eventually release dual-path communicators that utilize LTE Cat M1 connectivity. Like always, we promise to keep you informed about any updates.

The function of the LTEM-XA and LTE-XV remains largely the same from other AlarmNet Communicators. By installing and activating one of these modules, your Honeywell VISTA Security System will be able to communicate with the Resideo AlarmNet Servers across a fast and reliable LTE Cat M1 cellular network. If your alarm panel supports Total Connect 2.0, then you will be able to take advantage of that great service as well, provided that access to the TC2 platform is included in your monitoring plan. Remember that a VISTA-15P or VISTA-20P System must have PROM Chip Version of 9.12 or higher to support Total Connect 2.0. We sell PROM Chip Upgrades for the 15P and for the 20P if you need them. Please also refer to this FAQ on identifying and replacing PROM Chips.

While the 15P and 20P are most likely going to be the most commonly used systems with the LTEM-XA and LTEM-XV, you can technically use these communicators with any Honeywell VISTA System that supports ECP mode. Please feel free to contact us with any questions you have regarding system compatibility. You are also welcome to contact us if you are interested in starting new monitoring service. Our team is happy to help you get started. The best way to reach us is to email support@alarmgrid.com. We're here to check your emails from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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Alarm Grid is aware of Technical Notification #55 that identifies possible premature low battery warnings for Honeywell Combination Smoke and CO Detectors. Affected products include the Honeywell 5800COMBO, the Honeywell SiXCOMBO, and the new Honeywell Home PROSIXCOMBO for the PROA7PLUS.


According to Technical Notification #55 from Resideo, most instances of a premature low battery condition occur after replacing the batteries in a Honeywell 5800COMBO, Honeywell SiXCOMBO, or Honeywell Home PROSIXCOMBO. This notice pertains only to a low battery condition that occurs immediately, or almost immediately, after replacing the batteries in a sensor that has been in use for several years.

Each of the aforementioned combination smoke/CO detectors uses four (4) lithium 3V CR123A batteries for power. A premature low battery condition is when the sensor falsely indicates that the batteries inside the sensor are low on power, and a corresponding trouble condition is displayed for the associated zone(s) on the panel. But while the sensor is falsely indicating low batteries, the actual reality is that the batteries are still at, or near, full power.

Resideo states that the false low battery condition is the result of intermittent connectivity between the batteries themselves and the nickel battery contact points inside the sensor's battery compartment. The best way to verify that the low-battery condition is indeed false is to take a voltmeter reading of the batteries. If you find that the reading for each battery is at or above 3V, then you can confirm that the low battery condition is false. Any one of the four (4) batteries that reads below 3V could cause a low battery indication.

Additionally, Resideo suggests taking the following steps to see if a low battery trouble condition can be cleared:

  • Make sure each battery is properly seated and secured in its holder.
  • Make sure the battery contacts are snug with no movement.
  • Make sure the battery as well as the battery contacts are clean, and wipe them with alcohol or a mildly abrasive cloth if necessary.
  • Remove and reinstall the batteries to try and clear the trouble condition.
  • Replace old batteries with fresh ones to see if the trouble clears.

As a reference, the aforementioned sensors will typically report a low battery condition once the detected voltage drops below 2.3V. If you have a premature low battery condition on one of these sensors that you cannot otherwise clear, then make sure to check the batteries regularly and replace them as soon as necessary. If possible, try performing the steps above to see if you can correct a premature low battery condition. It may be necessary in a worse case scenario to replace any sensor affected by this condition. Attempting to use a sensor displaying a consistent low battery trouble is certainly not ideal, even if that condition is known to be false. Remember that these are life-safety sensors, so keeping them consistently powered on and functioning properly is crucial.

If you have any questions about this issue, then please not hesitate to email our support team at support@alarmgrid.com. We check our email from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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In order to reboot a router remotely using a VISTA P-Series Panel, you will manually activate an output, which will fault a zone. The zone fault will be programmed to activate a Z-Wave switch, which is powering the internet router or modem. A cellular connection is required to do this.

And there you have it, that's how you do it! Just kidding! We're going to cover exactly what you need to do. Alarm Grid had this scenario come up recently and thought it would make a good case study to cover.

First, we wrote an FAQ that covers how to manually control a programmable output through the keypad. But then we thought that putting the FAQ together with information outlining the exact problem that we resolved by using the manual output command might add some much-needed context and show how this command can really come in handy. This also outlines one of the reasons why a cellular communicator is so important to have as a backup to an internet connection!

Let me set the scene: The hero in our case study spends several months each year away from his primary residence. The system installed in this residence is a Honeywell VISTA-20P with a Honeywell Home Tuxedo installed, as well as an LTE dual-path communicator. The Honeywell LTE-IA or the Honeywell LTE-IV are equally suitable for use in this scenario. In addition, any of the compatible automation controllers, such as the Honeywell VAM or the older Tuxedo Touch WIFI, could be used instead of the newer Honeywell Home Tuxedo.

The Problem

While our hero is enjoying his time away, he discovers that his internet connection at home is down. Of course, if he were at home, the first thing he would do, after verifying that his ISP isn't experiencing an outage, is reboot his router to see if the connection comes back up. But he's not at home, and furthermore, there is no one he can send to his home to perform this task for him. Now, since he has a dual-path communicator with the cellular connection enabled and active, he doesn't have to worry that his panel won't be able to communicate a signal if the alarm goes off. He's safe in that regard. However, in addition to the alarm panel's ability to send signals through the internet when it is available, the Tuxedo also uses the internet to provide a communication path to Total Connect 2.0 so that he can control his Z-Wave automation devices remotely. This is a problem, and it's the problem we're here to solve.

Just to recap, we have a VISTA-20P Panel that is working, and it can communicate alarm signals via the cellular path. It can also be controlled via Total Connect 2.0 through the cellular path. We have a Honeywell Home Tuxedo that is working, and it can communicate with the panel through its hardwired keypad bus connection, but it can't communicate to TC2 through the internet. This means there is no way to remotely control Z-Wave Automation devices. Finally, we have an LTE dual-path communicator that is working on the cellular path, but not on the internet path.

The Solution

Basically, what this requires is a way to send a command from Total Connect 2.0 to the VISTA-20P Panel through the communicator's cellular connection. This command must be something that the panel can perform based on an entry from a keypad. In this case, we are going to enter a command via the TC2 keypad that will cause a programmable output to change state. This output is connected to a zone on the panel. When the output changes state, it will fault the zone. Then, based on the programming in a scene, the Tuxedo will turn the Z-Wave Module that is connected and providing power to the router OFF. This will drop power to the router. After a few seconds, another command will be entered through the keypad which will restore the zone, and a second scene will tell the Tuxedo that a restore on the zone causes the Z-Wave module to turn back ON. This will restore power to the router.

Here are the full details for this solution:

The first step in setting this up is making sure that you have an available zone to use as your triggering zone. If you have one of the hardwired zones on the panel available, then you can actually use Output 18, Trigger 2 for this purpose. Any of the hardwired zones 2 thru 8 can be used with this trigger. You can also use Output 17, Trigger 1, but it provides more current than Trigger 2, so we recommend that you save it for other potential uses. If you don't have one of these zones available, then you can use a zone on a Honeywell 4219 or 4229 8-zone expander, but this will also require the use of a relay instead of a trigger. If you are using the 4229, it has two (2) programmable relays built into it. If you are using the 4219, then you will need to add a Honeywell 4204. It is also possible to use a zone input from a wireless zone, such as a Honeywell 5816, along with one of the above mentioned relays.

One reason we love using Trigger 2, Output 18 for this is because it's so simple. Output 18 is already enabled in panel programming location *79, and as long as its programming hasn't been changed from the default, no additional programming is required for the output to work. However, there is still the matter of programming the zone to be used. In our example, we show Output 18, Trigger 2 connected to Zone 03. As you can see in the diagram below, we have connected the trigger to the Hi side of the zone, on terminal 12. As mentioned before, you can use this configuration on any of the Zones 02 thru 08, connecting the trigger wire to the Hi side of the zone. The reason you can't use this on Zone 01 is because the Zone 01 negative is completely isolated from all other negative terminals on the board. In order for the trigger to work to fault the zone, it must be common to the zone negative when the trigger is activated.


If you need to use a relay instead of the trigger, you will need to wire the relay to the zone so that when you turn the Relay ON, it faults the connected zone, and when you turn the Relay OFF, it restores that zone. The way this must be done will depend on the type of zone it is being connected to. When using a 5816 with the input terminals, you will need to wire one terminal of the transmitter to the relay's Common (C) and the other terminal to the relay's Normally Closed (NC). If you're using an expansion zone on a Honeywell 4219 or Honeywell 4229, then the wiring used for this zone, and whether or not an End-of-Line Resistor (EOLR) is used, will depend on how the rest of the zones on that expander are configured, as well as on the age of the expander. Earlier versions required an EOLR for each zone, while newer versions provide an option not to use the EOLR, based on the setting of a dip switch. The important thing to know here is that when a 4204 or 4229 relay is OFF, it has continuity between Common (C) and Normally Closed (NC). When it is ON, it has continuity between Common (C) and Normally Open (NO).


With the output wiring out of the way, we can move on to programming the zone. We're not going to go through the entire zone programming process. You can find information about how to program a zone on a VISTA-20P Panel in this FAQ. The two important things to know when it comes to zone programming are the Zone Type and the Hardwire Type. The Zone Type should be set to Zone Type 23, No Alarm Response. This Zone Type was specifically created to allow the panel to activate outputs based on a zone's change of state. Basically, Zone Type 23 allows the panel to recognize that a fault and/or fault restore has occurred on a zone, without it having to display a fault for that zone, or take any other action with regard to the zone itself. Zone Type 23 will never show a fault, and it will never cause an alarm condition. The Hardwire Type should be set to Normally Open (Entry 2 when prompted). Again, see the FAQ linked above for full details on zone programming. The Hardwire Type programming of Normally Open is specifically meant for use with the trigger connection shown above. If using a relay instead of a trigger, the Hardwire Type or Input Type setting may need to be different, depending on your wiring configuration, and the zone number.

The next step is to pair the Z-Wave module with the Honeywell Home Tuxedo. As always, we recommend that you first Exclude or Remove the Z-Wave device using the Tuxedo, before attempting to Include or Add the device. The reason we always recommend doing this is because devices are often joined to a Z-Wave network at the factory as part of Quality Assurance (QA). In many cases, once the device has been successfully joined to the test network, it is never cleared, and is simply packaged and sold as it is. Once a Z-Wave device has been paired with a network, it holds onto that network information until it receives a command telling it to forget the old network so that it can join a new one. The process of Excluding or Removing, is what tells a Z-Wave device to forget the old network. It's fortunate that any Z-Wave controller can tell any Z-Wave device to forget its old network!

A word about which Z-Wave module to use. You can use either an in-wall switch, or a plug-in module. If your Z-Wave Automation Controller supports Z-Wave Plus, then we always recommend using a Z-Wave Plus device. Although any Z-Wave controller can support just about any Z-Wave module, a Z-Wave Plus module loses its Z-Wave Plus attributes, including extended range and battery life, when used with an older Z-Wave controller. We like the idea of using a plug-in module, as it allows you to easily move your router if you begin to have range or interference issues.

Once the Z-Wave module has been learned into the Tuxedo, VAM, or Tuxedo Touch WIFI you then need to create a scene which will tell the module to turn OFF when Zone 3 (or whatever zone you choose to use) is faulted. You will need to program a second scene to tell the same module to turn ON when Zone 3 is restored. The easiest way to perform this programming is through Total Connect 2.0. We like to program scenes using the website, the examples that follow will assume that is how the scenes are being setup.

After logging into Total Connect 2.0, choose the menu option for scenes. If you do not see this option, contact your alarm dealer, and be sure that your account is properly configured, and that your monitoring plan includes access to Automation. For Alarm Grid customers, this would be our Silver Plan (Self or Full), or higher. After clicking on Scenes, choose Create Scene.


This will take you through a scene creation wizard. The first step is to name the Scene. This should be something easy to distinguish from other scenes, such as "Router Off". After choosing Continue, you will see where you can choose how the scene will be triggered. In our case, we want Triggered by a device, and when we expand this option, we then want to expand the section titled Sensors. Under Sensors, we see Zone 3, which we have named Router. When we expand this option, we can choose that this scene will activate when Zone 3 is Open (faulted) or Closed (restored). We intend to turn OFF the Z-Wave device when Zone 3 is faulted, so we will choose "When it is open".


After choosing which zone(s) you want to trigger the Z-Wave device, you will be taken to Step 3 of the scene creation wizard. In this step, you will choose which device (or devices) you want to control, and whether you want them to turn ON or OFF. This is our Router OFF scene, so we set our action accordingly.

Now that we have created an initial scene, in order to add the second scene (the one that will turn the router power back on) we need to click the + symbol in the upper right of the Scenes screen.


The programming for this scene will be almost identical to the first scene. We still want to trigger by device. The device is Sensor 3, which we named ROUTER, and we want the Z-Wave device to be turned ON when Sensor 3 is Closed, meaning the fault on the zone is restored. Here's the summary for the second scene.


That is the end of the programming and wiring for this solution. The final step is for our hero to manually activate Trigger 2, Output 18 through the keypad screen in Total Connect 2.0. Do this by entering the following command:

4-Digit Code + [#] + [7] + [18]

By entering this command, we're telling Output 18, Trigger 2 to activate. When it activates, it connects to ground. This ground is common to the Lo side of Zone 3. This causes a short on the zone (which is why we programmed it as Normally Open), which in turn causes it to fault. The fault on Zone 3 causes the Z-Wave device being used to power the router to turn OFF, powering the router down.

After around 20 seconds, our hero should enter the following command to restore Zone 3:

4-Digit Code + [#] + [8] + [18]

By entering this command, we are telling Output 18, Trigger 2 to deactivate. When it deactivates, the trigger disconnects from ground. This opens the circuit on Zone 3, causing it to restore from a faulted condition. This in turn causes the Z-Wave device being used to power the router to turn it back ON, powering the router back up. Once more, keep in mind that this option is only available because the customer in question, our hero, chose to use a dual-path communication method. If he had chosen to use an IP only connection, there would be no way for him to initiate the keypad command through Total Connect 2.0 that gets this ball rolling.

If you happen to be using a relay instead of the trigger output, there will be a few minor tweaks that you will need to make to this process. One of those tweaks will be the output number that you will use when performing this command. The FAQ that we linked in the second paragraph above goes into more detail on how to set this up using a relay, including covering the programming required in programming location *79.

If you need further assistance using this setup with a relay, feel free to reach out to us at support@alarmgrid.com. Our technical support staff are available M - F from 9:00 am to 8:00 pm Eastern. We will have some closures soon due to the holidays, so pay attention to our blog for information about when those will be. As always, we look forward to hearing from you!

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