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Welcome to our PROA7PLUS Cheatsheet! This document will cover various procedures and information associated with the Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS, Honeywell Home PROA7, Resideo PROA7PLUSC, and Resideo PROA7C. First we'll cover a preface, and then we'll dive deep into various system processes.

Table of Contents


Preface

The PROA7PLUS, along with its variants, represents the latest alarm panel from Honeywell Home and Resideo. Sometimes referred to as the ProSeries 7" All-In-One Systems, these are wireless all-in-one panels that connect with AlarmNet for alarm monitoring service. They can also be set up for use with the Total Connect 2.0 interactive platform, provided that access to the service is included in the user's alarm monitoring plan. Since AlarmNet supports IP-only alarm monitoring, cellular-only alarm monitoring, and dual-path alarm monitoring with both IP and cellular, you can technically use the PROA7PLUS and its variants with any alarm monitoring plan from Alarm Grid. To learn more about the Alarm Grid Monitoring Plans, please review this helpful post.

It should be mentioned that end-user programming for the ProSeries Panels is not available as of May 2021. The feature is currently in beta development and only available to those in the alarm industry. That is how we are able to provide information on how end-user programming looks and how it works. It is expected that the feature will be made available to the general public via a firmware update in the very near future. But please note that if your ProSeries System has not yet been updated to the firmware version that supports end-user programming, then the feature will not be available on your panel.

Right out of the box, the ProSeries Panels can support all of the Honeywell Home PROSIX Series Sensors and the Honeywell SiX Series Sensors that were originally built for use with the Honeywell Lyric Alarm System. It is important to note that once you pair a SiX Series Sensor with a ProSeries Panel, it will receive a firmware update and can never be reverted back to be used with a Lyric again. Once it goes to ProSeries Panel, it can never go back. The ProSeries Panels each have (127) zones available for the encrypted PROSIX and SiX Series Sensors.

Legacy sensor support is also available for the ProSeries Panels. If you add a Honeywell Home PROTAKEOVER Module to the panel, then you can pair sensors from one (1) of five (5) possible legacy frequency. The legacy frequency you decide to use is selected via an adjustable dial on the PROTAKEOVER Module. The available options include Honeywell 5800 Sensors (but not 2GIG), 2GIG 345 MHz Sensors (but not Honeywell), 319.5 MHz Sensors (Qolsys, Interlogix, GE), 433 MHz Sensors (DSC), and Bosch Sensors. You can only add one (1) PROTAKEOVER Module to a ProSeries Panel, so only one (1) legacy frequency can be used with the system at any given time. Up to (123) legacy zones are available on the ProSeries Panels. When combined with the encrypted zones for PROSIX and SiX Sensors, a maximum total of (250) zones are available on one of these systems.

One key characteristic of the PROA7PLUS is that the system is split into four (4) different variants, based on two (2) deciding factors, with each factor having two (2) options. First, you must decide whether you want the PLUS version or the BASE version. Most users ultimately go with the PLUS version, as the BASE version is more limited and requires an added communicator to get the system monitored. Second, you must decide whether you want the Honeywell Home version for residential use or the Resideo version for commercial use. Unlike the first decision, this second one really comes down to personal preference, and it won't really affect the performance of the system in any way.


PLUS Versions
BASE Versions
Honeywell Home Versions
Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS

Honeywell Home PROA7

Resideo Versions
Resideo PROA7PLUSC

Resideo PROA7C

PLUS vs. BASE

Most users who buy a ProSeries System opt for a PLUS Model. There are a few differences to be discussed between the PLUS Models and the BASE Models. A PLUS Model comes with a Honeywell Home PROWIFIZW Module already built-in for WIFI and Z-Wave Plus support. A BASE Model does not have this, but you can add one separately. If you only want WIFI support, and you don't care about Z-Wave Plus for home automation, then there is also a Honeywell Home PROWIFI that provides WIFI, but no Z-Wave Plus. Honeywell has chosen to go with a very modular design, so that users don't have to pay for features they may never intend to use.

A PLUS Model can be set up for IP-only monitoring (WIFI) right out of the box. You only need to add a cellular communicator if you want to set up a PLUS Model for dual-path monitoring with both IP and cellular. Conversely, a BASE Model cannot be set up for alarm monitoring right out of the box, as it does not have a built-in communicator. You must add an IP communicator and/or a cellular communicator to get the system monitored. If, for example, you want cellular-only monitoring, it may make sense for you to buy the BASE Model, and a cellular communicator, but only if you don't want any of the other features that are supported only on the PLUS Model. We'll cover those features in just a bit.

For reference, the IP communicators are WIFI modules that support wireless WIFI connectivity, and they cannot be used for wired ethernet connectivity. The options include the Honeywell Home PROWIFI, which adds WIFI only, and the Honeywell Home PROWIFIZW, which adds both WIFI and Z-Wave Plus. As of May 2021, only LTE modules are available for cellular connectivity. The options include the Honeywell Home PROLTE-A (AT&T LTE) and the Honeywell Home PROLTE-V (Verizon LTE). It's possible that a 5G cellular module might be released for the system someday, but that is not an option now.

There are two (2) other big differences between the PLUS Models and the BASE Models. One, a PLUS Model has a built-in camera for taking disarm photos on the system, while a BASE Model does not have an integrated camera. There is no way to add a panel camera to a BASE Model, so this will always be a feature you miss out on if you decide to get a BASE Model. Two, a PLUS Model supports Bluetooth LE connectivity for automatic Bluetooth disarming, while a BASE Model does not support Bluetooth. There is no way to add Bluetooth connectivity to a BASE Model, so again, this will be a feature you miss out on if you opt for a Base Model.

Honeywell Home vs. Resideo

Unlike the PLUS vs. BASE debate, the Honeywell Home vs. Resideo decision is more of a personal preference decision. The difference here is that the Honeywell Home Models say "Honeywell Home" across the front, while the Resideo Models say "Resideo" across the front. Other than that, they are exactly the same. Technically speaking, the Honeywell Home Models are intended for residential use, while the Resideo Models are intended for commercial or industrial use. But there is actually nothing stopping you from using a Resideo Model inside a home, or a Honeywell Home Model inside a business. For more information on the subject, we recommend checking out this blog we wrote on the subject.


General System Information

Below is some of the general information for the Honeywell Home and Resideo ProSeries Panels:

  • Panel Type: Wireless All-In-One
  • Voltage Input: 9VDC, 2.5A Transformer (Included - P/N 300-10260)
  • Backup Battery: 24 Hour Rechargeable Lithium Ion 3.6/4.2V, 5200mAH (Included - P/N 300-11186)
  • Total Zones: 250 Security Protection Zones
  • PROSIX and SiX Series Zones: 127 Zones
  • Legacy RF Support: 123 Zones, 319.5 MHz, 345 MHz, 433 MHz, or Bosch (with added takeover module)
  • Legacy RF Notes: Uni-Directional Only; Requires PROTAKEOVER Module
  • KeyFob Slots: 32 (ProSix & SiX Fobs)
  • User Codes: 96 (Master Code Hardcoded to Slot 1)
  • Partitions: 4
  • Automation: Z-Wave Plus (Automatically Included with PLUS Models Only)
  • Z-Wave Device Limit: 78 (Automatically Included with for PLUS Models)
  • Compatible Keypads: Resideo PROSIXLCDKP, Resideo PROWLTOUCH (Requires PROWIFIZW or PROWIFI)
  • Maximum Keypads: 8 per Partition
  • Event Log: 4,000 Events
  • Other Features: WIFI. The following features are supported on the PLUS Model only: Integrated Camera, Automatic Bluetooth Disarming, Wiselink (PROINDMV & PROOUTMV)
  • Package Contents: Panel, PROWIFIZW Module (installed, PLUS Models Only), Transformer (9VDC, 2.5A), Backup Battery, Manuals, Mounting Hardware w/ Wall Plate
  • Dimensions: 5.75"L x 7.875"W x 1.0"D
  • Mounting Options: Wall Mount or Desk Mount (Sold Separately)
  • Default Master Code: 1234 (should change for security purposes)
  • Default Installer Code: 4112 (recommended to keep at default)


Wiring

The ProSeries Alarm Panels include a transformer for powering on the system, but a user must supply their own wiring. The use of a prepared wire, such as a Honeywell LT-Cable is advised. However, traditional wiring is perfectly suitable. You should use a wire gauge between 16-gauge and 22-gauge. If you decide to use traditional wiring that you have prepared yourself, then please observe the following strict wire limits:

Wire Gauge Max Wire Run
16 AWG 110 Feet
18 AWG 70 Feet
20 AWG 45 Feet
22 AWG 25 Feet


System Arming

Arming the security system puts it into a secured state. If activity is detected while the system is armed (e.g. a door/window being opened, movement being detected, etc.), then the system may go into immediate alarm or require that a user verify their identity with a valid code to prevent an alarm. Please note that this does not apply to 24-Hour Zones, which will trigger an immediate alarm when activated, even if the system is in a disarmed state. Common examples of 24-Hour Zones include smoke detectors, carbon monoxide detectors, and emergency exit doors.

To arm a ProSeries Panel, click the ARM button on the main screen. Then choose the arming type to arm the system. You can Arm Away or Arm Home, with Arm Home being the system's version of Arm Stay. The difference between these arming modes is that interior sensors are automatically bypassed (ignored) when you choose Arm Home. This allows anyone still inside the building to move around freely, without triggering a false alarm. But in Arm Away, interior sensors are active and able to cause alarms on the system. There should be nobody remaining inside the building after you have enabled Arm Away mode. Please note that at least one (1) Entry/Exit Zone must be faulted during the Exit Delay countdown when Arming Away, or else the system will revert to Arm Home mode instead. This is because the system will assume no one left after arming, and that the user must have meant to Arm Stay. This is known as Auto-Stay Arming, and it is a false alarm prevention feature.

Keep in mind that if multiple partitions are set up with the system, then you will be able to select which partition you want to control before you press the ARM button on the main screen. You can select any of the four (4) partitions that are enabled on the system. A partition dropdown selection option will only be shown if multiple partitions are configured on the system. If partitions have not yet been configured, and the system still only has a single partition, then this dropdown option will not be displayed. Partitions are covered in greater detail later in this cheatsheet.

Another option called Arm Night will also be available if you have at least one motion sensor programmed on the system with the Arm Night feature enabled. Arm Night is a more secure version of Arm Home (Stay), in which any interior motion sensor with the Arm Night feature enabled will NOT be automatically bypassed. That is, if that sensor detects activity while in Arm Night mode, it will trigger a response (e.g. an alarm) on the system. Meanwhile, motion sensors that have Arm Night disabled will be bypassed and ignored by the system.

Also when arming the system, you can choose to enable or disable Entry Delay and Silent Exit. The default selection is to enable Entry Delay, and disable Silent Exit. If Entry Delay is disabled it will result in the system going into immediate alarm when an Entry/Exit Zone is faulted, as opposed to going into an Entry Delay countdown, during which the user can disarm the system before an alarm occurs. Silent Exit being enabled will result in the panel not producing any sounds as the Exit Delay countdown occurs. Please note that if Silent Exit is enabled, then the Exit Delay countdown timer will be automatically doubled for that arming session. This will give the user extra time to vacate the building, as there won't be any countdown timer reminding them that they need to exit immediately.


Please note that you can also arm the system via Total Connect 2.0 if the system is monitored and set up with the service.


System Disarming

Disarming the system takes it out of a secured state and puts it into a Disarmed mode, in which only 24-Hour Zones are able to trigger system alarms. You can only disarm the system while it is in an armed mode. Please note that if you have Armed Home or Armed Night, then an option for Quick Exit will be available. This feature allows a user inside a location that is Armed Home or Armed Night to briefly step outside, for instance, to take out the trash, or to retrieve something from their car. When you press Quick Exit, the system begins the normal Exit Delay Countdown. During this time, any Entry/Exit door can be opened without causing an alarm. As long as the door is secured again before the countdown expires, the system will return to its prior arming state at the end of the countdown. This prevents the user from having to disarm, then arm again.


In Arm Away mode, the only available option is to Disarm.


To disarm the system, you must have a valid code. This can be a regular user code, or the Master Code. Click the Disarm button to pull-up a numeric digital keypad. Then enter the valid code into the digital keypad. The system will disarm. Don't forget that if you need to disarm a different partition than the one displayed on the screen, then you should first select that partition from the dropdown menu and provide a user code with authority for the selected partition. This dropdown menu will only be present if multiple partitions are set up on the system.

Please note that you can also disarm the system via Total Connect 2.0 if the system is monitored and set up with the service.


Adding a Zone

To add a zone to a ProSeries Panel, you must have access to end-user programming. Otherwise, all zone programming is completed remotely by your monitoring company. To access the system's auto-enrollment mode, start from the main screen and click the small menu button (three horizontal bars) at the bottom of the home screen, and then choose Tools, enter the Installer Code (default 4112), and then choose Programming, and then choose Peripherals, and then press the + button at the top of the screen to put the system into its auto-enrollment mode.


With the system in this mode, you can then fault (activate) a sensor to get it to auto-enroll. You will be taken to the Edit Sensor screen where you can configure the zone settings. The following programming fields are available:

  • Sensor Type: Set automatically during auto-enrollment. This is the model of sensor that was enrolled (e.g. SIX-Contact, SIX-Motion, etc.)
  • MAC: Set automatically during auto-enrollment. This serves as a Serial Number identifier for PROSIX and SiX Sensors. Please note that if you enroll a legacy sensor using the PROTAKEOVER Module, then this will instead be a Serial Number or a Sensor DL ID Field.
  • Partition: Allows you to assign the sensor to a specific system partition. Only enabled partitions can be selected.
  • Service (with grey background): Available on certain types of SiX and PROSIX Sensors. Allows you to add an additional (secondary) function for the sensor. An example is adding support for an external NC Contact that is wired into a PROSIXCT or SiXCT terminals when its primary function is the Reed Switch.
  • Zone Number: Cannot be changed. Shows which Zone Number the sensor is being assigned. Remember that the system supports (127) encrypted PROSIX and SiX zones, plus (123) non-encrypted legacy zones, for a total of (250) zones.
  • Service (with white background): Available on certain types of PROSIX and SiX Sensors. This allows you to set the primary function for the sensor. An example would be choosing between the Reed Switch function and the External Contact function on a PROSIXCT or SiXCT. If the Reed Switch is the primary function, the Contact Terminals would then be the secondary function.
  • Zone Descriptors (1 & 2): Used for naming the zone. The ProSeries Panel will speak the Zone Descriptors, plus the Device Type, when the sensor is faulted. For example, if you have Zone Descriptor 1 set as "East", Zone Descriptor 2 set as "Door" and Device Type as Door, then the panel will speak "East Door Door" when the sensor is faulted. In this case, Zone Descriptor 2 is unnecessary. Please note that you do not technically need to provide any Zone Descriptors for the zone. You can leave one or both of the fields blank. Many users will just program Zone Descriptor 1 and leave Zone Descriptor 2 blank. If you leave both of them blank, then the zone will only be known as whatever is set for Device Type.
  • Device Type: This is used to set the type of sensor you are adding (e.g. Door, Window, Flood, etc.) Along with the Zone Descriptors, the Device Type is spoken by the panel when voice annunciation is enabled and the sensor is faulted. Depending on the Device Type you choose, only certain types of Response Types will be available. If you want access to a certain Response Type that isn't available for the sensor's normal Device Type, then you may consider setting the Device Type to "Other", which will result in all Response Types being available. Please note that if you set the Device Type to "Other", then it will not be spoken when the sensor is faulted and voice annunciation is enabled. For example, if you had Zone Descriptor 1 set as "East" and Zone Descriptor 2 set as "Bedroom" and the Device Type set as "Other", then the panel would only speak "East Bedroom". Available Device Types include Door, Window, Garage Door, Other, Police, Environmental, Glassbreak, Flood, Medical, Motion Sensor, and Temperature.
  • Response Type: This option determines what action the system will take when the sensor is faulted or activated. Depending on the Device Type you set, only certain Response Type options will be available. If you want to choose from every available Response Type, set the Device Type to "Other", and you will have a complete selection of possible Response Types. Available Response Types include: Not Used, Entry Exit 1, Entry Exit 2, Perimeter, Interior Follower, Day/Night, 24 Hour Silent, 24 Hour Audible, 24 Hour Auxiliary, Interior Delay, Monitor, Trouble, Arm Stay, Arm Away, Disarm, No Response, Silent Burglary, Garage, Garage Monitor, and Local Alarm.
  • Supervised: Toggle ON or OFF. When Supervised is ON, the system will expect the sensor to check-in periodically to ensure that it is working properly. If Supervised is ON, and the sensor fails to check in (due to environment or range issues, the unit being powered down, or having a dead battery, or the device having been removed), then the system will display a trouble condition to alert the user.
  • Alarm Report: Toggle ON or OFF. When Alarm Report is ON, the system will report to AlarmNet when the zone causes an alarm on the system. AlarmNet then forwards the signals to the user's Central Station. This is assuming that the system is being monitored. If Alarm Report is OFF, then no alarm signal will be sent out if the zone causes an alarm on the system. However, if Total Connect 2.0 is enabled for the user, an email or text notification can still be sent.
  • Version: Cannot be changed. Shows the firmware version of the programmed sensor.
  • Chime: This is the sound the panel will make when the sensor is faulted. Choose from a variety of Chime options, or set to Disabled to turn OFF the chime for the zone.
  • Armed Night: Only available if a Device Type of Motion Sensor is selected. Toggle option for ON and OFF. If Armed Night is ON, then the sensor will remain active when the system is set to Armed Night mode, as opposed to being automatically bypassed as an interior sensor. Please note that you must have at least one programmed motion sensor with Armed Night turned ON in order for the Arm Night option to be selectable from the arming screen.
  • Supervision Time: Cannot be adjusted from this screen. If a sensor fails to check in with the system for longer than this period of time, the system will put that sensor into a Trouble or Check condition. The panel is literally telling you to check on that sensor.


When you are finished adjusting the zone settings, choose either Save or Save & Add Another to save the change. If you choose Save, then you will be taken to the Peripherals List. If you choose Save & Add Another, then you will be taken back to the Add a Peripheral Screen so you can enroll another sensor. You can edit the zone settings later by selecting the sensor within the Peripherals List.


Deleting a Zone

If you need to delete an existing zone, start from the main screen of the system, and click the menu button (three horizontal bars) at the bottom of the screen. Then choose Tools, and enter the system's Installer Code (default 4112). Then choose Programming, followed by Peripherals. This will access the Peripherals List. Find the zone you want to delete and check the box on the right-hand side. If you are deleting multiple zones, then check the box for each zone you want to delete. With all the necessary boxes checked, click the black "Delete" button in the upper-right corner. The system will ask you to confirm. Choose Delete on the right-hand side to confirm that you want to delete the sensor(s).


Adding a Z-Wave Device

You can only add a Z-Wave device if there is a PROWIFIZW Module inside of the ProSeries Panel. The PROA7PLUS and PROA7PLUSC have this module included out of the box, but it must be added separately to the PROA7 and PROA7C. When you add a Z-Wave device to the system it can then be controlled both locally at the panel and remotely from Total Connect 2.0 if the system is monitored with a plan that includes automation services. You can also include Z-Wave devices with smart scenes so that they activate automatically based on a set schedule or with predetermined system events.

To add a Z-Wave device, start from the main screen of the system, choose the menu button at the bottom (the three horizontal bars), followed by Tools. Enter the Installer Code for the system (default 4112). Choose Programming, and then Z-Wave Peripherals. It is advised that you clear (Exclude) the device from the panel first to wipe out any residual Z-Wave network data. You can do this even if the Z-Wave device in question is not enrolled with a Z-Wave controller. Many Z-Wave devices will have residual Z-Wave network data left over from the factory, so "excluding" first is almost always a good idea. Choose Exclusion Mode to put the panel into a mode for clearing Z-Wave devices. Then activate the inclusion/exclusion function on your Z-Wave device. There may be a button on the Z-Wave device for this purpose, or you may need to enter a specific programming code. Refer to the manual for your Z-Wave device for more information. The panel should show a device as excluded. Press done after the device has been excluded. Then choose Inclusion Mode to put the panel into a mode for adding Z-Wave devices. Activate the inclusion/exclusion function for the Z-Wave device again. This may be the same function you used when clearing the device from the network. The panel should show that a Z-Wave device was added. Press the done button when finished.


Deleting a Z-Wave Device

Deleting a Z-Wave device will clear it from the network so that it is no longer paired with the ProSeries Panel. You can then pair the Z-Wave device with a new Z-Wave network. Please note that deleting a Z-Wave device may also be referred to as clearing the device or excluding the device. Z-Wave devices are typically cleared from the network before pairing to ensure that any remaining Z-Wave network data is properly wiped out.

To delete a Z-Wave device, begin from the home screen of the panel, select the menu button at the bottom (the three horizontal bars), and then press Tools. Provide the Installer code for the system (default 4112). Select Programming, and then Z-Wave Peripherals. Choose Exclusion Mode to put the system into a mode for clearing Z-Wave devices. From there, activate the Inclusion/Exclusion function on the Z-Wave device. This process will vary depending upon the Z-Wave device in question. It may have an inclusion/exclusion button, or there may be a different process. Check the manual for the Z-Wave device to find out for sure. The panel should show that a device has been cleared from the network.


Changing the Master Code

A ProSeries Panel will have a default Master Code of 1234. You will want to change this code for security purposes. Choose a different code that is easy for you to remember, but difficult for someone else to guess. To begin, start from the main screen of the panel. Click the menu button (the three horizontal bars), and then choose Settings. Select User Management. Then provide either the Master Code (default 1234) or the Installer Code (default 4112) for the system. This will allow you to access the Users Menu.

Click on the Master option from within the user list. This will take you to the Master User settings screen. Find the field for pin, and click the pencil icon on the right-hand side of that field. You will be asked to provide a new pin. Be sure the 4-digit code you enter is unique within the system. Enter the desired pin code. Then confirm that pin code by entering it a second time. Then press Save in the upper-right corner. You will be asked to enter the Master Pin to save. You should enter the EXISTING Master Code at the screen. If you are changing the code from the default of 1234, then you will enter in that 1234 default, and not the new code that you changed the Master Code to. After you enter the existing Master Code, the change will be saved and applied. The Installer Code can be used to get into this programming area, but it cannot be used in the final step, the existing Master Code must be known in order to change it.


Adding a User

There are (96) user slots available on the ProSeries Panels. When you add a new user code, you will be able to use that code for arming and disarming. To get started, click the Menu button (the three horizontal bars) at the bottom on the home screen of the panel, and then choose Settings, followed by User Management. Provide either the Master Code (default 1234) or the Installer Code (default 4112) to gain access to User Management. Click the + icon in the upper-right corner to begin adding a user. You will then provide a name for the user. After you save the name, you will be taken to a settings screen for that user. Make sure to provide and confirm a pin code for the user. Then at the bottom, you will need to set which partition(s) the user has access to. Make sure to set the partition access, or else the user code will not have any authority. In fact, the system will not let you add a code until you have set both a pin code and access authority. You can also set options for Bluetooth Disarming and Z-Wave Lock Control at this time, or you can save that for later. When you are finished, press Add in the upper-right corner. You will be asked to provide a pin to confirm the adding of the new user. Enter in the system's Master Code (default 1234). The Installer Code will not work for this. The new user will be added to the Users List. If you click on the user name, then you can edit its settings.


Deleting a User

After you delete a user, that code will no longer be able to disarm the system. To delete a code, you must access the User Management Menu. Begin from the main screen of the system. Click the three horizontal bars menu button at the bottom of the screen. Choose Settings, followed by User Management. Provide either the Master Code (default 1234) or the Installer Code (default 4112) to gain access. You will enter the User Management Menu. Find the user that you want to delete, and click the checkmark box on the right-hand side of that user. You can also delete multiple users at once by checking the box for every user you want to delete. Once you have selected the user(s), press the Delete button in the upper-right corner. You will be asked to provide the Master Code to confirm deletion. After entering the code, the user(s) you had selected will be deleted. Those user slots will be opened and available for assigning new codes.


Bluetooth Disarming

Automatic Bluetooth Disarming will allow the system to disarm from Armed Away mode automatically upon detecting a paired Bluetooth-compatible phone. Up to six (6) Bluetooth-compatible phones can be set up with this feature. Each of the 6 phones must be associated with a different user. The Master User can also be set up with a Bluetooth Phone for automatic disarming. A phone will only be able to disarm the system if it is removed from the area before the system is fully armed. If the Exit Delay countdown expires and the phone is still detected in the area, then it will be disabled and ignoreed for that arming session and unable to disarm the system. This prevents the system from disarming immediately due to someone forgetting their phone and accidentally leaving it behind. The feature will go into effect, and the system will immediately disarm upon the user faulting an Entry/Exit Zone with the phone properly connected across Bluetooth. You must set up the feature before it can be used. The feature is completely optional, and it can be turned OFF at any time.

You set up the Bluetooth Disarming feature within the User Management Menu. Begin from the main screen of the system. Click the three horizontal bars menu button at the bottom of the screen. Click Settings, followed by User Management. Provide either the Master Code (default 1234) or the Installer Code (default 4112). Click on the user you want to set up for Automatic Bluetooth Disarming. Then choose the field for Disarm With Bluetooth. At this time, you should activate Bluetooth pairing mode for the phone that is being paired. Press the blue Pair button in the top-right corner of the ProSeries Panel. On the phone, find the ProSeries Panel and click on it. The panel and the phone will both display pairing messages and a pairing key. Click pair on both devices to complete the pairing process. When you back out to the user settings screen, make sure to press Save in the upper-right corner. If you are saving the Master User, then you will be asked to provide its code for confirmation.



Partitions

If you are unfamiliar with security system partitions in general, please read this FAQ. Basically, partitions allow you to "section-off" your alarm system so that certain sections (partitions) of the system can be armed or disarmed, while the other sections (partitions) remain in their current armed or disarmed state. Up to four (4) partitions can be configured on a ProSeries Panel. By default, only the first partition is enabled. Partition 2, Partition 3, and Partition 4 will only be used and in effect after they have been added. You need to first access the partition settings menu. Begin from the main screen of the ProSeries Panel. Click the three (3) horizontal bars menu button at the bottom. Then choose Tools, and enter the system's Installer Code (default 4112). Click Programming, followed by Partitions. The list of enabled partitions will be shown on the screen. To add a new partition, click the + icon in the upper-right. You will then be able to configure various settings for the partition. These are mostly arming settings that you should configure as needed based upon how the system is being used. You want to set Entry/Exit Delays to proper settings so that no false alarms occur on the system. When you are finished, press Save in the top-right. If you ever need to delete a partition, you can access the Partitions Menu, click on the checkmark box on the right-hand side of any partition that is being deleted to select it, and then press Delete in the top-right. Please note that you cannot delete the main Partition, which is Partition 1.


Whenever you are at the main screen of the system, you can set which partition you want to control. There will be a dropdown menu you can click on to choose a different partition to switch to. Whenever you go to switch partitions, you must provide a code with access to that partition. You can also provide the Master Code which has global authority and access to any system partition. Note that only enabled partitions will be present.


Advanced Settings

The Advanced Settings Menu is a deep-level programming menu that includes sub-categories for Communicator, System, and Reporter. Many of these options are fairly complex, and it is suggested that you not change them unless instructed by your monitoring provider, or you are formally trained in alarm systems and you know what you are doing. To access this menu, begin from the main screen of the system. Click the three horizontal bars menu button at the bottom. Press the Tools option. Provide the system's Installer Code (default 4112). Choose Programming. Then choose Advanced Settings. You will then be in the Advanced Settings Menu to make system changes. Once finished, press the Save button in the top-right to save any changes you have made.


Miscellaneous Settings

This section will very briefly cover other settings that haven't been covered earlier in this cheatsheet. This includes setting the WIFI network for the panel. To access the Settings Menu, begin from the main screen of the system. Click the three horizontal bars menu button at the bottom. Then choose Settings. You will have options for WI-FI, User Management, and Secondary Keypad. You may be asked to provide the Master Code (default 1234) or Installer Code (default 4112) before configuring these settings.


Please note that you can also configure settings for Backlight Timeout, Voice, Chime, Brightness, Volume, and Screen Cleaning right from the main screen. Just click or drag down the bar from the top of the system's home screen to access the primary settings. No access code is needed!


Total Connect 2.0

Total Connect 2.0 is the interactive security notification and automation platform used with the ProSeries Alarm Panels. You can access Total Connect 2.0 remotely using a web browser or by using the free Total Connect 2.0 Mobile App that you can download from the Google Play Store or Apple App Store. Your system must have some type of monthly monitoring plan to be used with Total Connect 2.0. Your monitoring company will help you get started with the Total Connect 2.0 service, usually by sending you a Total Connect 2.0 activation email after you are activated for alarm monitoring service. You will need to create a username and password for logging into Total Connect 2.0. For Alarm Grid customers, your username will typically be the email address associated with the monitored account. You can use Total Connect 2.0 to arm and disarm the system, check its current status, control programmed Z-Wave devices, and more!



Conclusion

We hope that you found this Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS Cheatsheet to be useful! We want you to get the very most out of your Resideo Alarm System. And keep in mind that this post may be updated in the future to include new information. It's very likely that Resideo will be updating the ProSeries Panels in the future to include new features and functions, and we will make sure to provide you with the resources you need to take advantage of whatever is offered. Also, if there's anything else that YOU would like to see included in this cheatsheet, please leave a comment down below, and we just might add it in. This is a living, breathing document, and we will likely update it as we learn more. And stay tuned to the Alarm Grid blog for more content coming soon!

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This is just a friendly reminder that the 3G and CDMA Sunsets are still on-track. The AT&T 3G Sunset occurs January 31, 2022, while the Verizon CDMA Sunset occurs December 31, 2022. Alarm Grid can help you take action and make a transition to newer LTE hardware, or make alternative plans.

The 3G and CDMA Sunsets go beyond the alarm industry. Older cellular technology is being shut down and will no longer work. This is being done to transition resources to newer and more advanced cellular technology that will provide more effective service for users. After the shutdown, only 5G and 4G LTE will remain active as major network bands. Once your alarm system is set up with LTE, you will have a trustworthy and reliable communication path for many years to come.

You may have to start thinking about the 3G or CDMA Sunset if you have an older alarm system that is still using a 3G or CDMA Communicator. By the time the Sunset occurs and the associated cellular network is shut down, you will either have upgraded to newer technology, or your hand will be forced and your system will no longer be monitored.

The following outcomes are possible for any user with a 3G or CDMA Communicator:

  • Upgrade to a new alarm panel entirely, namely one that will support LTE, or a Honeywell Panel or Resideo Panel that is IP Only.
  • Keep the existing alarm panel, and upgrade its 3G or CDMA Communicator to a new LTE Communicator that will allow it to stay monitored.
  • Downgrade to IP-only monitoring service. This is not possible for any system that uses Alarm.com.
  • Terminate all monitoring service for the panel. It can still be used as a local sounder, but it will not report signals.

Users with 3G and CDMA Communicators who do not take any action will be subject to that last option. Once the 3G or CDMA Network is shut down, the panel will lose network connectivity, unless it is a Honeywell Panel configured for internet connectivity. A system that loses all connectivity due to a permanent network shutdown can still be armed and disarmed, but it cannot send any signals to the central station, meaning that no help can be automatically dispatched. The system also won't send notifications to Alarm.com or Total Connect 2.0, and the user won't be able to control their system remotely from one of those platforms. Also, the user will not be able to maintain an active Certificate of Alarm (CoA) for a discount on their homeowner's insurance. Only actively monitored systems are eligible for a CoA.

Many users aren't even aware that their systems have 3G or CDMA Communicators that need to be upgraded. There are ways to tell if your communicator needs to be upgraded, but it may be difficult for someone who isn't trained to tell. If you have an older security system that you think may be in need of a communicator upgrade, then we can help you. Reach out to our team at support@alarmgrid.com, and we will work with you to make sure that you are ready for the 3G or CDMA Sunset. Depending on your situation and the equipment, we will advise you to do one of the following.

  • Upgrade to a panel that can support LTE Cellular.
  • Upgrade the communicator for an existing panel to LTE Cellular.
  • Certain Honeywell Panels can be downgraded to support IP-only so that you can stay monitored using the equipment you already have.

Do you have any questions about the 3G or CDMA Sunset? Maybe you have already upgraded, and you want to let us know about your experience? Or maybe you have been putting off upgrading and are waiting until the last minute? We would love for you to leave a comment down below to let us know how you are preparing for the 3G or CDMA Sunset in your home or business. This is a major event for the security industry, and it's happening very soon. Stay tuned to the Alarm Grid blog for more security news and updates on the 3G and CDMA Sunset, as we all transition to LTE.

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We're back with more 2GIG Edge content today. First, if you haven't already seen our post about setting up 2GIG Edge Facial Recognition, then make sure to go check that out. We really want each new Edge user to get the most out of their system. But today's topic is Automatic Bluetooth Disarming.

Whether you prefer to call it Automatic Bluetooth Disarming, Bluetooth Low Energy, Bluetooth LE, or whatever, it's a pretty cool feature for the new 2GIG Edge Alarm System. It's actually pretty similar to what Qolsys offers on the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus. I personally found the 2GIG Edge Bluetooth Disarming feature a little bit easier to set up, though I will admit that I also found the options associated with the feature to be a bit lacking. And by that I mean, there aren't really any options for the feature, other than turning it ON or OFF, or as 2GIG likes to call it, ACTIVE or INACTIVE.

You should also keep in mind that only a maximum of five (5) phones can be set up with the feature, and you can only have one (1) phone paired per user. If you want to have the maximum 5 phones set up for Automatic Bluetooth Disarming, then they will need to be set up with 5 different users. And we also want to mention that the feature can only be used when the system is Armed Away. It won't work when the system is Armed Stay. But all of that aside, we'll just have a fairly quick post today, I'm just going to give you a quick rundown of setting up the feature and putting it into action.

First, to get started setting up 2GIG Edge Automatic Bluetooth Disarming, you need to access the Users Menu. Start from the main screen of the 2GIG Edge Panel. Click the small Settings Icon (the gear) in the bottom-right corner. Then enter in the Master Code (default 1111, but usually changed) or the Installer Code (default 1561, not usually changed), or use Facial Recognition if you have the feature set up for the Master User. Once inside, choose Users to access the Users Menu.

In the Users Menu, find the user you want to set up Automatic Bluetooth Disarming for. You can do it for the Master User or any other valid user. You cannot set it up for the Installer Code, which makes sense because the Installer Code cannot disarm the system. And you cannot configure it for the Duress Code either, as that would certainly lead to countless false alarms, which we obviously don't want. But in any case, decide on a user that CAN be set up for Automatic Bluetooth Disarming, and click the pencil icon next to the name to access the edit screen for that user.

As you go down the list, you will see options for Display Name, Access Code, Facial Recognition, Bluetooth Disarming, and User Number. Obviously, the one we want is Bluetooth Disarming. And when you click that, you will be taken to the Bluetooth Disarming Edit Screen for the user you selected.


At this time, you should turn ON your phone's Bluetooth feature. You will very shortly be putting the panel into a scanning mode where it can find pairable Bluetooth devices. Remember that you can only pair certain Bluetooth devices, namely smartphones. You won't be able to pair something like a tablet or a laptop. Again, this makes sense based on how the feature is used.

When you are ready, click the blue PAIR button on the right-hand side. Then press the green Scan button on the following screen. The Edge will begin scanning for a pairable Bluetooth device. If everything was done correctly on the Edge, and your phone is in its Bluetooth pairing mode, then it should appear. In our example, the Bluetooth device is called VELVET.


You should also notice a Bluetooth pairing request on your smartphone.


Once you click the Pair button on your phone, you will get the notification on the panel. Press the green Pair Device button to complete the process.

And that's pretty much it! You can make the feature ACTIVE or INACTIVE within the settings menu for the assigned user. When active, the feature will always be in effect. However, there is one exception. If the panel detects that the phone is still present when the system officially becomes armed - in other words, immediately after the Exit Delay has expired - then that phone will be barred from activating the feature for the current arming session. This is designed intentionally to prevent the panel from being accidentally disarmed prematurely because of a forgotten or left-behind phone. If you realize you forgot your phone before you left, then don't expect that phone to be able to activate the feature and disarm the system. But, the feature can still be activated by a different phone, as long as that phone was properly programmed and it was outside of wireless Bluetooth range of the panel when the Exit Delay expired. One other note is that the phone must be disconnected from the 2GIG Edge for ten (10) full seconds to prevent being barred from activating the feature for that arming session.

As we mentioned earlier, a maximum of five (5) users on the 2GIG Edge can be set up with the Automatic Bluetooth Disarming feature, and each user can only have one (1) paired phone. The feature will only work in Arm Away mode. It will not work when the system is Armed Stay. Activating the feature is quite simple. Your phone should automatically connect with the Edge once it gets into Bluetooth range. But the system won't actually go and automatically disarm until you activate a delay period by faulting an Entry/Exit Zone, or in other words, opening a door used for coming and going, such as a front door, back door, or garage door. For the feature to work properly, the phone must "connect" with the panel before the Entry Delay is triggered. And with the phone already connected, the system should disarm immediately upon activating the Entry/Exit Zone.

There is a timer so that the feature won't activate right away. This is to prevent you from accidentally activating the feature while you are still nearby after already arming the system. This timer is five (5) minutes. In other words, 5 minutes after you arm your system, once the system detects the paired Bluetooth device, if the system is in its Entry Delay window, it will disarm. It's super convenient, and it's good to see that 2GIG accounted for the possibility of a forgotten phone so that it does not create a security risk. But it is a bit questionable that there's no way to change or adjust the 5-minute timer. Maybe 2GIG can make this an adjustable setting in a future update? We would sure appreciate that!

When actually using the feature, it is advised that you check and make sure that the Bluetooth on your phone is reconnected before faulting the Entry/Exit Zone and activating the Entry Delay Period. If it's not reconnected to Bluetooth, then the feature will not work, and the system will not disarm automatically. We also want to say that to prevent false alarms, you should always be prepared for the possibility that the feature may fail. Be prepared to disarm with a valid code if needed. It's true that you can also disarm with Facial Recognition if that is set up, but you should always be prepared for the worst. Out of the three - Bluetooth, Facial Recognition, and classic code entry - classic code entry is still the most dependable. But we can also say that when testing the Bluetooth Disarming feature at Alarm Grid, it worked flawlessly.

Have you gotten to try out 2GIG Bluetooth Disarming yet? What do you think of the feature? Leave your thoughts in a comment down below. And stay tuned for more security system content on the Alarm Grid blog coming soon!!

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With the 2GIG Edge now available, users have access to some features we have never seen before in home security. One feature that really stands out is the system's facial recognition capabilities. This is the first ever panel from Alarm Grid to support facial recognition disarming!


The 2GIG Edge facial recognition feature is set up when you go to configure a user for the system. You can also configure it for the Master User, which is likely what you will want to do, along with changing the code away from its default of 1111. This is probably one of the first things you will do after getting the 2GIG Edge Security System, so consider this to be a bit of a starter's guide as well.

And don't forget that the feature is totally optional to use. If you don't want your 2GIG Edge System storing your "facial biometrics", then you don't have to. But if you do decide to set up the feature, we'll tell you right away, it works very well, and it's super convenient. It is also important to mention that all facial biometric information is only stored locally at the panel. This information is neither shared nor stored with Alarm.com in any fashion. Up to ten (10) users on a single 2GIG Edge Panel can be set up with the Facial Recognition feature, so do keep that in mind if you have a large number of users set up with your 2GIG Edge. But with that of the way, let's get started setting up the Facial Recognition feature on the 2GIG Edge!

What you need to do is access the User's Menu. Begin by clicking the Settings Icon (the gear) in the bottom-right corner. Then provide the Master Code (default 1111) or the Installer Code (default 1561). Then choose Users. And just like that, you are in the Users Menu.


You can click the Add User button in the bottom-right corner to create a new user. But if you haven't configured the Master User yet, then that's what you should do first. To configure the Master User, just click on the pencil icon next to it. You will be taken to the menu where you can adjust a variety of different settings.


From here, you can set a custom Display Name if you want a more personalized touch than "Master User". But today, we're going to focus on the facial recognition feature. You can see that it is disabled by default, so you should go and enable it by setting the toggle bar to green. And once you do, you will be greeted by the Facial Recognition Disclaimer Screen. Read through it, and assuming you agree, then click the Agree button in the bottom-right. You have to scroll all the way through it, or else you won't be able to click the Agree button, as it won't be illuminated.


Then you will need to capture your facial profile. You start by pressing the Begin button. You will need to position your head into the outlined box. Then once it recognizes your face, the outline will turn green. You will be asked to look to the right, and it will detect the movement. Then you will be asked to look to the left. Again, the movement will be detected. Oh, and when you go to do this yourself on your own 2GIG Edge, you don't need to have your phone in the photo. I was just trying (with varying degrees of success) to capture the moment in a series of photos. If you just complete the process normally as 2GIG intended, it's very easy.

You want to be very careful when capturing your facial profile - definitely more careful than me trying to pull double-duty by trying to take photos of the process at the same time! Make sure your face fits as nicely in the outline as possible. Feel free to move your head closer or further away from the panel if you need to. Then, when asked, turn slightly to the right, and then slightly to the left, and you will be all done! It only takes a matter of seconds. You will get the "Congratulations" message, and the feature will be in effect. And if you feel concerned that maybe you did a shoddy job, you can always reconfigure your 2GIG Edge Facial Profile later on. If you find that the system is having a tough time recognizing your face, then repeating this process (and doing it carefully) can make all the difference.


Once you click Next, you will be taken to a screen where you can choose to watch a tutorial video about how the Edge uses facial recognition. It may be helpful for you to get the very most out of the feature. Or you can skip it if you feel like this guide is sufficient. But you will still need to take an "Avatar" photo. Again, I'm a one-man team, so I tried to take a photo of myself trying to take a photo of myself (I never thought I'd write that sentence). Considering the circumstances, I think my "Avatar" turned out pretty nice!


If you're satisfied with your appearance, you can choose Use This Image. Or if you're a perfectionist, feel free to Retake Photo. If you decide that you can't take a good photo to save your life, then you can choose to Skip the step. But after that, facial recognition will be ready to go. If you did this for the Master User, you can even use facial recognition to get into Master-level programming. Whenever the system needs a code, the panel camera will activate. You just position your head, look left and right (like you're suspicious), and you will get in. Now the real question - can I take a photo of myself passing a facial recognition test?

Disclaimer - I cheated. That shot above is actually a video frame. The "User Master User Recognized" message only appears on the screen for a split-second, much too fast for an amateur self-cameraman like me to take a proper photo. But let's focus on what really matters here. This feature actually works VERY well. You can see it recognized me quite easily. And don't worry about it being a security risk. NOBODY else in the Alarm Grid Office could disarm with my facial profile. We had someone else try. They don't have the same "facial profile" as me, so the Edge wouldn't acknowledge them. But my face is able to trigger it quite easily.

You can use facial recognition to arm, disarm, and even enter into Master-level programming when a code is needed. Just be careful to set up your "facial profile" properly, and the 2GIG Edge will take care of the rest. If you have any thoughts on the feature, please share them down below in a comment. And stay tuned for more content from Alarm Grid coming soon!

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Qolsys has released the long-awaited Firmware Version 2.6.0. This will be the base version for the Qolsys IQ Hub and will allow users to configure the new IQ WIFI Mesh Router from the touchscreen of the IQ Panel 2. These are only a couple of the new features. This is truly an exciting update!

We've been talking about the Qolsys IQ Hub, well, forever, it seems. But honestly, it's been "coming soon" for over a year now. We are so glad that the wait is almost over. The Qolsys IQ Hub will truly be a DIY dream. Qolsys has taken a "see no green" approach to this panel, meaning there is no reason to open the panel fully, so you should never see the green printed circuit board (PCB). It won't even have screw terminals! The battery will be easily end-user replaceable with a minimum of "deconstruction" to the alarm panel itself. Some of the best features of the IQ Panel 2/2+ will be available in this new panel, such as Bluetooth disarming, and Alarm.com Camera Streaming at the panel.

A couple of things have been removed though. It will not have a built-in camera, nor will it offer 2-way voice capability. The IQ Hub is meant to be a slightly less expensive alternative to the IQ Panel 2 or 2 Plus, and to the Qolsys IQ Panel 4 that we should be seeing later this year. Initially, the IQ Hub will support PowerG Wireless Sensors, but later, there will be 319.5 MHz, 345 MHz, and 433 MHz options available. Each IQ Hub is intended to support only one (1) RF frequency.

You might be saying, "I thought this was a blog about Firmware Version 2.6.0?" Well, it is. But the fact that we have Firmware Version 2.6.0 available now means that the full release of the Qolsys IQ Hub won't be far behind. The Qolsys IQ Hub is scheduled for a Q2 2021 release. Aside from all the new features and improvements for the IQ Panel 2 Plus itself, another exciting capability that is added in this firmware release is the ability to control and configure the new Qolsys IQ Router through the IQ Panel 2 or 2 Plus Touchscreen.

The Qolsys IQ Router is also slated for release in Q2 of 2021. This is a mesh router system that will support up to eight (8) nodes, and both 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz networks. What's great about this product is that it allows a user to create a WIFI subnet inside their regular network. Any devices that use WIFI can be attached to the network, not just security devices, and multiple nodes (up to 8) can be added to strengthen the mesh network. If you change internet providers or even just internet equipment, you simply unplug the IQ Router from the existing router, plug it into the new router, and all of the WIFI devices will remain connected to the WIFI sub-network without having to reconfigure any of them. These are two upcoming products associated with the release of Firmware Version 2.6.0 that we're really looking forward to.

Below you'll find some of the additional new features supported on Firmware Version 2.6.0:

New Features:

  • Support for DSC hardwire keypads (HS2LCD, HS2ICN) via the CORBUS on the PowerG Hardwire to Wireless Translator (PG9WLSHW8) with Firmware V 1.1. Also added new PGM system triggers for Police, Fire, Aux & CO emergency.
  • Support for DSC NEO Wire-Free Keypads HS2LCDWFx, HS2LCDWFxENG.
  • Support for new V4 PowerG Daughter Card.
  • Panel now supports remote Z-Wave Smart Start integration from Alarm.com.
  • This update includes the critical firmware2 fix that resolves an issue where certain panels would automatically reboot with previous firmware applied.

Fixes & Improvements

  • Added a setting to allow the panel to send 1 or 10 images taken by PowerG Image Sensor Cameras (PG9934P, PG9944, NEXT CAM, PG2, NEXT CAM K9-85 PG2, BW-IRC, BW-IPC, TOWER CAM PG2, BW-ODC) during an alarm event to Alarm.com. Previously, ten (10) images were stored locally at the panel, but only the first image was sent to Alarm.com.
  • Added a setting allowing alarm dealers to select a specific time for Communication Tests to be sent to the monitoring station. If no selection is made, the time will be randomized.
  • Added a setting for detection direction on PG9902 Outdoor Curtain PIR. Users can choose left to right, right to left, or both.
  • Added the ability to disable PowerG activation LED on devices that have one in order to conserve battery.
  • Added Partition support for EN Grade 2 Panels.
  • Improved 700-Series Z-Wave performance on UK & EU Panels.
  • Bluetooth Disarm now available for UK & EU Panels.
  • Added language support for Spanish (Spain), French (France), Finnish, and Polish.
  • Added support for European date format: DD.MM.YYYY.
  • Improved cellular strength matching between Panel and Alarm.com for Latin America.
  • Silent and Audible Panics now report separate CID codes to central station.
  • Duress Alarm and Silent Police Panic can now be dismissed from Alarm.com.
  • Improvements to PowerG Wireless keypad functionality (WS9LCDWFx).
  • Keyfob arming now follows the Auto-Bypass setting on the panel.
  • Duress codes from KP-140 & KP-141 now transmit to Alarm.com.
  • Corrected an issue where a PG9905 Temperature Sensor would send double alarms for the same event.
  • Fixed an issue related to virtual device integration on the panel, which includes Liftmaster Garage Door control from the panel UI, and Solar Integration from Alarm.com. See TSB 201026 for additional details.

Into each life, a little rain must fall. It's not all good news, although, this is more of an inconvenience than actual bad news. Because Firmware Version 2.6.0 also contains the important firmware2 fix, it must be downloaded and installed from the Qolsys Server. The server has some logic built-in that allows it to tell if the panel being updated requires the firmware2 fix, or not. For this reason, much like Firmware version 2.5.5, Qolsys is not making this firmware file available for download. This means that Alarm Grid can't host it on our site.

What this means for the end-user is that in order to get 2.6.0, your panel must have a WIFI connection. Once it does, you have two ways in which you can get the firmware. You can request it from your alarm dealer, and they can push the update to your panel from Alarm.com. This will be a free update. As long as your panel has WIFI 24/7, this is a simple and no-fuss way to get your panel updated. Just remember, if for some reason your panel loses WIFI, the update won't go through. Alarm.com will not allow the panel to be updated via a cellular-only connection. You can also follow the instructions below to request the update via Patch Tag.

If your panel happens to be in an area where there is no WIFI, maybe it's a hunting or fishing cabin, or a second home where WIFI is not readily available, then you may be able to use your cell phone as a mobile hotspot and fool the panel into thinking it's connected to WIFI. The amount of data in this file is about 250 MB according to Qolsys. Alternatively, you may be able to move the panel to a spot that has WIFI available just long enough to perform the upgrade. In a situation like this, you need to be in control of when the update begins, so in this case, you would want to use the "Patch Tag" method of updating. To do so, once your panel has a WIFI connection, do the following:

Follow these instructions after making sure your panel is on version 2.0.1 or higher. If the panel is on 2.5.0 or 2.5.1, the user must first update to 2.5.3 before running the update for 2.6.0:

  • Touch the small gray bar in the center at the top of the Home screen on the panel.
  • Touch “Settings”
  • Touch “Advanced Settings”
  • Enter a valid Installer or Dealer Code (defaults are 1111 and 2222 respectively)
  • Touch “Upgrade Software”.
  • Touch “Patch Tag” and enter: iqpanel2.6.0 then touch “OK”.
  • Important: If you need to install 2.5.3 prior to this update, the Patch Tag for that version is: iqpanel2.5.3. Run that update before running the Patch Tag for 2.6.0.
  • Touch “Upgrade Using Network”. If the panel is connected to WIFI, the system will begin downloading the update, it will be installed when the download completes. Once the update begins Do Not Touch The Screen! The update will take about five (5) minutes, and the panel will reboot as a part of the process. When the panel returns to the home screen and the Green LED at the right lights, the process has completed.

What do you think about the new Qolsys firmware, and the new products they have in the pipeline? Share your thoughts in the comments below. Is there a security topic you'd like to see us discuss? If so, leave a comment and we'll be happy to cover any security-related topics of interest. As always, we look forward to hearing from you!

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If you have a new Alarm.com Security Camera or you are thinking about getting one, then you may want to know just how easy it is to get a camera online and paired with your personal Alarm.com account. Today, we're looking at the setup process for the ADC-V515, ADC-V523, and ADC-V723.


You may recall that the ADC-V515, ADC-V523, and ADC-V723 were our Top Alarm.com Camera Picks in a post we made a couple of months ago. These are indeed the cameras you will most likely be considering if you are a residential user. They're great because they can be powered with a simple plug-in adapter that comes included with each device, and they are also extremely easy to pair with the local WIFI in your home. Plus, the ADC-V515 and ADC-V523 Indoor Cameras can be rested on a desk, table, or countertop for a tools-free installation. The ADC-V723 Outdoor Camera needs to be hard-mounted, so you will have to break out the toolkit to install that one. But just drill a few holes and secure the camera's backplate using included screws, and that camera will also be ready to go.

The other popular Alarm.com Camera for residential use is the ADC-V622, which is also sometimes called the Alarm.com Wellcam. Unlike the other three (3) cameras, Alarm.com markets the ADC-V622 for more of an "independent living" solution so that you can monitor a loved one. It can make a good security camera as well, though its applications are usually a bit different. Alarm.com also has a great lineup of commercial security cameras, which you can usually identify by having a C in the name (e.g. ADC-VC826). But for today, our focus is strictly on the three (3) main residential security cameras, the ADC-V515, ADC-V523, and ADC-V723. We may cover the other cameras in a future post as well, so stay on the lookout for that. But for now, besides the camera, the other things you need to get started are a home WIFI network and an alarm monitoring plan with video surveillance that includes access to Alarm.com, such as an Alarm Grid Platinum Plan. You can learn all about our monitoring plans in this post. Remember that you will only use Alarm.com Cameras if your security system supports Alarm.com, or if you choose to use a stand-alone video-only Alarm.com plan. If you have a Resideo or Honeywell Alarm System, then your system will most likely use Total Connect 2.0 instead of Alarm.com. In that case, there is a nice selection of TC2 IP Cameras you can choose from. But today, we're only looking at Alarm.com Cameras.

When you have a new Alarm.com camera, the first thing you will want to do is power it on. For the three cameras we're checking out today, the power adapter comes included. Most users find the stock setup to be sufficient, but Alarm.com does offer a convenient 9-foot extension cable called the Alarm.com ADC-VPE-9FT-W if you need an extra-long wire run to the nearest outlet. Alarm.com recommends extending the power wire no more than 100 feet. Once you plug the camera in, you can verify that it is receiving power by seeing that the camera's LED light has turned on.


The next step is to get the camera online. These are WIFI cameras that don't support wired ethernet options. You must get the camera connected to wireless WIFI internet. The ADC-V523 and ADC-V723 support both 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz networks. But the ADC-V515 only supports 2.4 GHz networks, and it will not support 5 GHz networks. Keep that in mind if you are using the ADC-V515. Each camera can be paired using AP Mode pairing or WPS pairing. Of these two methods, AP Mode pairing is more secure, and it is the method recommended by Alarm Grid. Check out any of the FAQs below for instructions on AP Mode pairing:

WPS, stands for WIFI Protected Setup. You can use WPS pairing as an alternate method for getting your Alarm.com Camera online. Although WPS pairing is usually seen as easier than AP Mode pairing, it isn't as secure, and it opens up the door for various network vulnerabilities. If you accept the risks, then we have guides showing WPS pairing as well.

Once your camera is online and has a solid green LED, all you need to do is pair it with your Alarm.com account. You can do this using the website or mobile app. Both methods are very easy, so it really comes down to preference as to which one you use. If you decide to pair through the website, then make sure you are using a compatible web browser for Alarm.com.

If you haven't tried out the Alarm.com Mobile App for controlling your system remotely, then setting up a camera through the mobile app can be an excellent way to show you how it works. Anyone with an Alarm.com account can use the mobile app at no extra charge, and you can conveniently download it for free from either the Google Play Store on Android or the Apple App Store on iOS. Then use one of these guides to pair your Alarm.com Camera:


We hope that you find these guides useful for setting up an Alarm.com Residential Camera. We will likely be covering the Alarm.com Wellcam ADC-V622 and the Alarm.com Commercial Security Cameras sometime in the near future, so stay on the lookout. Feel free to comment below to share your thoughts on Alarm.com Cameras. What do you like about them? Is there anything you'd love to see in future updates and releases? Leave a comment down below, and stay tuned for more content on security systems and cameras coming soon.

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Alarm Grid is here with a video recap! We have four (4) new videos this time, all featuring myself. We have cellular communicator installation videos for the 2GIG GC2 and GC2e and some videos explaining the use of thermostats on Alarm.com. Let's check out the latest Alarm Grid videos!

Upgrading the 2GIG GC2 to LTE

I show you how to upgrade the 2GIG GC2 to LTE. There are two (2) LTE communicators currently available for the 2GIG GC2. These are the 2GIG LTEA-A-GC2 AT&T LTE Communicator and the 2GIG LTEV1-A-GC2 Verizon LTE Communicator. Upgrading to LTE involves removing the system's old 3G or CDMA communicator and installing a new LTE module in its place. It is very important that you do this before the 3G Sunset to prevent any disruption to your monitoring service.


Installing a Cellular Communicator Into a 2GIG GC2e

I show you how to install a cellular communicator inside of a 2GIG GC2e. The 2GIG GC2e Security System does not come with any available communication path by default. You must add a cellular communicator to get the GC2e monitored. The communicator will connect the system with the Alarm.com servers. Alarm.com then forwards important information, such as alarm events and system trouble conditions to a central monitoring station and/or the end user directly via text message and/or email.

ADC-T2000 and ADC-T3000 Thermostats Work with Alarm.com

I explain how you can use the Alarm.com ADC-T2000 Thermostat and Alarm.com ADC-T3000 Thermostat with the Alarm.com interactive platform. Both the ADC-T2000 and ADC-T3000 are Z-Wave Plus thermostats that pair with virtually any Z-Wave controller or hub. If that Z-Wave hub also happens to be an Alarm.com Security System that is actively being monitored, then the thermostat will be automatically pushed over to the Alarm.com platform after it has been enrolled with the system and the system syncs with Alarm.com.


Adding the ADC-T2000 to an Alarm.com Account

I show you how to pair the Alarm.com ADC-T2000 Thermostat with your Alarm.com account. The ADC-T2000 is a Z-Wave device. Like most Z-Wave devices, when you pair it with your Alarm.com Security System, the device will be automatically pushed over to your Alarm.com account the next time that your alarm system performs an automation sync with the server. You will then be able to control the thermostat remotely through the Alarm.com website and mobile app and include it with Alarm.com Smart Scenes.

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You may recall us briefly discussing the Alarm.com Camera Onboard Recording feature when it was announced that the ADC-SVR122 was being discontinued. Today, we're taking a closer look at the feature, what it entails, and how you can get started. Let's check out Alarm.com Onboard Recording!


Simply put, Alarm.com Onboard Recording allows a compatible Alarm.com Camera to record captured footage locally to a micro SD card that is on board the camera. As the camera is connected with the Alarm.com servers, the user can access the footage on the Micro SD card remotely using the Alarm.com website or mobile app. Only footage that is still on the Micro SD card can be accessed. As the camera continues to record and store video, older footage on the Micro SD card is deleted to make space. You must access and save any important footage on the Micro SD card before it is deleted and lost forever. Many Alarm.com users have found that onboard recording is a nice alternative to using a streaming video recorder (SVR) device.

There are many things to keep in mind when thinking about Alarm.com Onboard Recording. The first thing you should consider is which Alarm.com Cameras support the feature. At this time, there are only three (3). These are the ADC-V515, the ADC-V523, and the ADC-V723. It's likely no coincidence that these cameras also happen to be the premier residential video surveillance options offered by Alarm.com. You may also recall that Alarm Grid took an in-depth look at these same cameras not too long ago. Check out that post here. Remember that you will need a monitoring plan that includes both video surveillance and access to Alarm.com to use any of these cameras. Examples of compatible plans include an Alarm Grid Platinum Level Plan (Self or Full) or an Alarm Grid Video Only Plan. Learn about monitoring plans here.

Once you have a compatible camera, you can then start thinking about which Micro SD card you want to use. The Micro SD card you select cannot be larger than 256GB in size, and it should be a high-quality card that has been specifically built for video surveillance. Alarm.com lists the following Micro SD cards as compatible:

  • Micron Industrial Memory Cards (Available in 128GB and 256GB)
  • SanDisk High Endurance
  • WD Purple Micro SD Cards

Additionally, you should check out the following FAQs from Alarm Grid that show you how to install the Micro SD card for each of the compatible ADC Cameras:

After selecting the proper plan, a compatible camera, and a recommended Micro SD card, make sure your monitoring company enables the "Onboard Recording with Smart View" feature on your account. You will not be able to set up the feature on your account until this option has been enabled. Once you have the Onboard Recording feature set up and running, accessing the recorded footage is very simple. You can use the Alarm.com website or mobile app for this task. We recommend checking out our FAQ on Viewing Alarm.com Onboard Recorded Video from an SD Card for more information.

What do you think of the Alarm.com Camera Onboard Recording feature? Would you like to see it become available for more Alarm.com Cameras? Leave a comment down below, and share your thoughts. And stay tuned to the Alarm Grid Blog for more security system news coming soon!

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If you have been keeping up with the Alarm Grid blog, then you have likely seen us discussing Alarm.com Doorbell Cameras at some point or another. Today, we're breaking down the three (3) most popular options of doorbell cameras for Alarm.com to help you determine which one is best for you.


The three Alarm.com Doorbell Cameras we will be discussing today include the Alarm.com ADC-VDB770 Video Analytics Doorbell Camera, the SkyBell Slim Line II 720p Doorbell Camera, and the SkyBell Round 1080p WIFI Doorbell Camera. While we can straight away say that the ADC-VDB770 is the premium option here and offers the most impressive features, some users might not need such a loaded device, and they might instead prefer one of the other options. But if you want a quick and dirty answer as to which doorbell camera is the "best", then most security experts are going to steer you towards the ADC-VDB770. Still, there are so many avenues to explore here, that it's really worth looking at the devices from an in-depth perspective.

Before diving into the specifics of each Alarm.com Doorbell Camera, it important to understand one key aspect. Unlike regular Alarm.com Security Cameras, you do not need a true video monitoring service plan to use one single Alarm.com Doorbell Camera device on your Alarm.com account. This is great news for Alarm Grid Gold Plan members with access to Alarm.com, because you can add a single doorbell camera to your account, without having to upgrade your monitoring plan. There are some video "clip limits" to keep in mind, but most users rarely find them to be an issue.

If you go with the Alarm.com ADC-VDB770, you will get 1,200 monthly and 1,200 total clips. For the other doorbell options, it's just 400 monthly and 400 total clips. Most users find 400 to be plenty and they are rarely in danger of reaching their limit. But getting 1,200 clips with the ADC-VDB770 can be a nice bonus. For more information on Alarm.com Clip Limits, please review this FAQ. Please note that if you do use doorbell devices in conjunction with a true video monitoring plan, then each doorbell will count as a full Alarm.com Camera, with its clips counting towards the monthly limit.

One last thing we want to say is that each of the three (3) doorbell cameras we will be discussing today has its own omni-directional microphone, and you will be able to use the device for two-way audio when configured with Alarm.com. This is universal across all three (3) devices, as is getting push notifications to your phone, so we figured we would address that aspect before getting into the individual specifications.

Now, with that out of the way, let's start actually discussing the devices in-depth. We will start with the Alarm.com ADC-VDB770.

If we're looking purely at recording capabilities, the Alarm.com ADC-VDB770 is the clear winner here today, It offers a live recording resolution of up to 1440x1920, though the resolution will often be turned down to prevent any lags or disruptions on a live camera stream due to upload bandwidth requirements. Recorded clips are also available in 1440x1920 resolution. The camera's field of view (FoV) is also quite impressive, at 150° Vertical, 115° Horizontal. It's also the only Alarm.com Doorbell Camera with High Dynamic Range (HDR). Alarm.com also says that it offers "rapid people detection" and a "premium build quality". Infrared (IR) Night Vision ensures that the camera works well in the dark.

But there are a few intangible considerations with the Alarm.com ADC-VDB770 that aren't necessarily factors with the other doorbell cameras shown here. First, the Alarm.com ADC-VDB770 is often marketed for its ability to be used as a "touchless doorbell". You can add on accessories like a "Do Not Touch" Cover, and a "Stand On Mat To Ring Doorbell" Door Mat. It really changes your experience in using and interacting with the device. Of course, you don't have to set up the device this way, you can keep its doorbell button exposed and fully functional. But in the wake of the COVID-19 Pandemic, the need for a "touchless" product makes sense.

The ADC-VDB770 is also the only Alarm.com Doorbell Camera at the time of this writing in March 2021 that supports any form of Alarm.com Video Analytics. To be clear, the ADC-VDB770 is compatible with a very limited form of Video Analytics, in which there can only be one Video Analytics recording rule per device. There can only be one (1) Ground Zone recording rule, and only "People" can be set as the trigger. The camera does not have a motion detector, and you are required to set up Video Analytics to get the camera to function how you want. This is where the "rapid people detection" feature comes from.

One interesting "quirk" for the ADC-VDB770 is that it actually has a noticeably more narrow operating temperature than the other doorbell camera devices we will soon be discussing. For cold weather, the ADC-VDB770 is only safe down to -22°F, unless you obtain the "cold weather collar" accessory (sold separately), which will bring the low-end operating temperature down to -40°F. We've never heard of a "temperature collar" for any security system equipment before, but sure enough, the Alarm.com ADC-VDBA-TC is a real thing. The other doorbell cameras do not have an equivalent "collar". They just work in the colder -40°F without an add-on. Meanwhile, on the other end for "hot" temperatures, the ADC-VDB770 Doorbell Camera is listed at a surprisingly low 104°F. We know that many users live in areas where it regularly gets hotter than that. For that reason, you may want to be a bit wary of the device's operating temperature. Meanwhile, the other two doorbell cameras have "higher" operating temperatures of 122°F and 140°F, respectively. You shouldn't run into many issues there. But 104°F may have you sweating as you wonder if your doorbell camera investment can withstand the heat of a hot summer day.

In our experience, we have seen most customers who get the Alarm.com ADC-VDB770 ultimately have good success setting up the Video Analytics feature, and they are highly satisfied with the device's overall performance. But there are some users out there who simply don't care for the fine-tuning and precision setup that comes with Alarm.com Video Analytics.

These users just want a simple doorbell camera that interfaces nicely with their smartphone. Visitors can press the button to ring the doorbell or it also has a passive infrared motion detector that, if enabled, tells the camera when to start recording because someone has walked into the viewing area. If that is the case for you, then we're sure you will be very happy with one of these two (2) alternative options to the leading ADC-VDB770.

The SkyBell Alarm.com Slim Line II Doorbell Camera, also known as the ADC-VDB105X (Satin Nickel) or ADC-VDB106X (Bronze), certainly makes a compelling argument if you are just wanting something slightly more basic but effective as a doorbell camera. We often see this with Alarm.com equipment. Their premium line is fantastic, but then one step below it they have a more "entry-level" option that is actually quite excellent in its own right. And that's really the case with the SkyBell Slim Line II Doorbell Camera. It's a great entry-level doorbell camera, overshadowed by the flashy, high-tech offerings of the ADC-VDB770.

With the SkyBell Alarm.com Slim Line II, you only get 720p live-streaming, and 720p recorded footage. Again, the live-streaming quality can be toned down to adjust for low-bandwidth and whatnot, but 720p is where it maxes out. This is still very clear footage, and you can pair it with the camera's wide field of view (170° Horizontal, 110° Vertical) for some truly excellent results. And you still get features and functions like push notifications on your phone regarding doorbell camera activity. Plus, you get the same great IR night vision capabilities. Overall, you aren't losing out on too much by going with the Slim Line II, so certainly consider it as a viable option. And you can't go wrong with that simple, yet modern rectangular slim design.


Last up, we'll discuss the Alarm.com Round SkyBell, also known as the ADC-VDB101 (Satin Nickel) and the ADC-VDB102 (Bronze). Honestly, there's not much reason to choose this model over the Slim Line II, unless you're particularly fond of the round design. The round model can also achieve a higher live video resolution (1080p vs 720p), though it is still limited to 720p for recorded clips. The camera of the round model offers an impressive 180° Field of View, and the night vision recording range is still about 15 feet in full color. This one doesn't use IR for night vision, so the more ambient light in the area, the better the nighttime images will be. Just like before, you can get push notification doorbell camera alerts on your phone, which is the main benefit of these devices.

Here is a breakdown of the doorbell cameras:


ADC-VDB770
Slim Line II
Round
Image(s)



Video Analytics
- (1) Ground Zone Recording Rule.
- Only "People" Set As Trigger.
None None
Motion Detection
From Video Analytics PIR PIR
Touchless Functionality
Yes (Cover & Mat Sold Separately) No No
Streaming Video Resolution
Up to 1440x1920 Up to 720p Up to 1080p
Recorded Video Resolution
Up to 1440x1920
Up to 720p Up to 720p
Horizontal Field of View
115° 170° 180° w/ auto-scaling
Vertical Field of View
150° 110° 180° w/ auto-scaling
High Dynamic Range (HDR)
Yes No No
Night Vision
Infrared (IR) ~15 Feet Infrared (IR) ~15 Feet
Full Color ~15 Feet
Microphone for Two-Way Audio
Omni-Directional Omni-Directional Omni-Directional
Power Requirements

16-30VAC, 10VA

15VDC, 8W (533mA)

10-36VAC, 10VA

12VDC, 0.5-1A

10-36VAC, 10VA

12VDC, 0.5-1A

Operating Temperature
-22°F to 104°F
-40°F to 104°F (w/ Temperature Collar)
-40°F to 122°F
-40°F to 140°F
Operating Humidity
Less than 95% RH, Non-Condensing 10% to 80% RH 0% to 100% Condensing
Clip Limits w/o Video Monitoring Plan
1 Video Doorbell Device Per Account.
1,200 Monthly Clips
1,200 Total Clips
Cannot Increase w/o Video Plan.
1 Video Doorbell Device Per Account.
400 Monthly Clips
400 Total Clips
Cannot Increase w/o Video Plan.
1 Video Doorbell Device Per Account.
400 Monthly Clips
400 Total Clips
Cannot Increase w/o Video Plan.

Have you used any of these doorbell cameras with Alarm.com? Please let us know about your experiences in the comments section below. Also, let us know if there are any other Alarm.com features you would like us to cover in a future blog post. We look forward to hearing from you!

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One product that we have yet to discuss in great detail is the Honeywell Home PROINDMV Indoor Motion Viewer. This is a very promising accessory for PROA7PLUS users, especially those who are looking for a more affordable alternative to Honeywell IP Cameras and true video surveillance service.


If you are familiar with image sensors, then the Honeywell PROINDMV Indoor Motion Viewer is exactly that, plus a bit more. It is part of the Honeywell Home PROSIX Lineup of wireless sensors, so perhaps PROSIXINDMV would have been a more appropriate name. But nomenclature aside, this is a very handy and useful sensor for anyone with a PROA7PLUS Alarm System, especially if your monitoring plan doesn’t include video surveillance, and you are looking to keep your monitoring costs down.

You can think of the PROINDMV as a PIR motion detection sensor, combined with a video camera. It should basically be treated as an interior motion. If its PIR sensor is triggered while the PROA7PLUS System is Armed Away or Armed Night with the PROINDMV listed as active, the system will go into alarm, and the PROINDMV Camera automatically produces either a 10-second video clip or a still-motion image. The clip or image is made available at the PROA7PLUS Panel under the Camera Log, and it can also be seen on Total Connect 2.0. We expect that an update allowing the image or video clip to be automatically forwarded to the central station will be made available sometime in the not-too-distant future. The PROINDMV will also produce an image or video clip if its PIR is tripped during the Entry Delay Period, but in that case, the image or video clip will be held, and only sent out if the system isn’t disarmed in time and ultimately enters alarm.

The PROINDMV will only capture an image or video clip if it is triggered while the system is Armed Away or Armed Night, or in an Entry Delay Period. At this time, there is no way to request a manual “peek-in” like you can for Honeywell IP Cameras. However, we are hopeful that this feature will be made available in a later update. Anyone with access to Total Connect 2.0 can use at least one (1) PROINDMV. And if your TC2 account includes automation (Alarm Grid Silver Plan or higher), then you will be able to add up to eight (8) PROINVMD devices. Only the ten (10) newest clips or images are available, and they are automatically deleted after thirty (30) days. Images and clips can be sent via IP (WIFI) or cellular.

Overall, we think the Honeywell Home PROINDMV is a great product if you aren’t quite ready to make the leap to full video surveillance with Honeywell IP Cameras and an Alarm Grid Platinum Plan. The video camera records in 10 frames per second (FPS), so it isn’t anything too fancy. But it’s certainly good enough for verifying alarms and identifying suspects in a true break-in event. The PIR sensor covers more than 39 feet by 54 feet, with a 90° detection angle, making it suitable for large rooms in your home or business It even offers Pet Immunity for small animals weighing up to 80 lbs, provided that you follow the mounting guidelines. It will be nice for Resideo to finish making all the features available, as the lack of a “peek-in” is sorely missed. We also eagerly await the ability for clips and images to be automatically forwarded to the central station, as that is very important for alarm verification in certain jurisdictions.

You can purchase the Honeywell Home PROINDMV right now from the Alarm Grid website. Remember, this device only works with the PROA7PLUS ProSeries 7” All-In-One Panel from Resideo and Honeywell Home. We will be sure to keep you updated on this blog as new features for the PROINDMV are made available. We’re sure that Resideo has some great ideas in mind for this device, and looks to be promising sensor. If you have any questions about the PROINDMV Motion Viewer, or if you are interested in alarm monitoring services for access to TC2 so that you can get started with your own PROINDMV, send an email to support@alarmgrid.com. We’re here to check your email from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!
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