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Alarm Grid has learned about issues that may arise if you attempt to use an SIA PROM Chip on a Non-SIA Honeywell VISTA Panel. Doing so may prevent connected ECP devices from working properly. Issues may also arise if you attempt to use a Non-SIA PROM Chip on an SIA-approved VISTA Panel.

Before we discuss the issue itself, we will first cover some terminology to ensure that everyone is on the same page. Many Honeywell VISTA Alarm Panels come in both SIA and non-SIA variants. For example, there is the Honeywell VISTA-20PSIA and the Honeywell VISTA-20P, the Honeywell VISTA-15PSIA and the Honeywell VISTA-15P, etc. When you see SIA in the panel's name, that indicates that the alarm panel has been configured to meet various guidelines outlined by the Security Industry Association (SIA) for false alarm prevention. For all intents and purposes, SIA-Compliant VISTA Panels are basically the exact same as non-SIA VISTA Panels, except that the SIA-approved panels have various programming restrictions put into place to prevent false alarms. For example, an SIA-compliant VISTA Panel will not allow you to disable Entry and Exit Delay periods, and they will require you to set a minimum Dialer Delay for the system. There are various other restrictions that we won't cover in this post. Just know that an SIA-compliant system will have various restrictions in programming for the purpose of preventing false alarms.

Meanwhile, the PROM Chip installed on a Honeywell VISTA System sets its firmware. You can easily locate the PROM Chip on your VISTA System's green circuit board. Just look for the small black square chip with the white sticker on it. The white sticker includes version information so the user can identify the type of VISTA System they are using and its current firmware. Users remove older PROM Chips and replace them with newer ones as a means of upgrading their VISTA Systems to support new features. Alarm Grid sells 15P PROM Chips, 20P PROM Chips, and 21iP PROM Chips for Honeywell VISTA Systems. We typically advise replacing a 15P or 20P PROM Chip with less than Firmware Version 9.12, as that is the minimum version needed to support Total Connect 2.0. Likewise, the minimum PROM Chip needed on a VISTA-21iP for Total Connect 2.0 is 3.13. For more information on replacing PROM Chips, please see this helpful FAQ.

Please note that it is only possible to replace a PROM Chip on a VISTA System with a firmware version or PROM Chip version of 2.0 or higher. If your VISTA System shows a PROM Chip version of less than 2.0, then it is not possible to replace its PROM Chip, and you must replace the panel entirely. Also note, that you should never attempt to remove or replace a PROM Chip while your VISTA Panel is powered on. Always power down the panel completely before replacing its PROM Chip.

For the longest time, it was believed that you could use an SIA PROM Chip on its non-SIA VISTA printed circuit board (PCB) without experiencing an issue. For example, if you removed the PROM Chip on a Honeywell VISTA-20P, and replaced it with a WA20PSIA PROM Chip, then it was believed that no issues would occur. The same was believed to be true if you used a non-SIA PROM Chip on an SIA-compliant VISTA board. An example there would be if you removed the PROM Chip on a Honeywell VISTA-20PSIA and replaced it with a 20P PROM Chip. Aside from determining what was allowable within programming, no other issues were believed to occur if you used an SIA PROM Chip on a non-SIA VISTA System PCB, or vice-versa.

But upon further testing, that is not the case starting with VISTA System Firmware Version 9.17 on VISTA-20P Panels. Any Honeywell VISTA-20P PCB (non-SIA) that is being upgraded to Panel Firmware Version 9.17 or higher must have a non-SIA 20P PROM Chip. Likewise, any Honeywell VISTA-20PSIA System PCB (SIA-Compliant) that is being upgraded to Panel Firmware Version 9.17 or higher must have a 20PSIA PROM Chip. If you try to use an SIA PROM Chip on a non-SIA VISTA System (or vice-versa), then it is possible that peripheral devices connected to the system's ECP bus may not work properly. ECP devices for a VISTA System include any wired keypads, any alarm monitoring communicators, and any wireless receivers. This same error is also believed to occur on any Honeywell VISTA-15P (or VISTA-15PSIA) that is being upgraded to Panel Firmware Version 9.17 or higher, though further testing is needed to verify if that is indeed the case.

You can determine whether your VISTA System is an SIA Panel PCB or a non-SIA Panel PCB by checking a sticker on the panel's terminal block. This is a small barcode sticker at the bottom of the terminal block, below the phone line terminals. Check for one of the following messages:

  • SAVS20PSIA - Regular VISTA-20P
  • SAV20P-SIAP - VISTA-20PSIA
  • SAVS15PSIA - Regular VISTA-15P
  • SAV15P-SIAP - VISTA-15PSIA

Long story short, if you are using a Honeywell VISTA-20P, VISTA-20PSIA, VISTA-15P, or VISTA-15PSIA and you wish to PROM upgrade it to System Firmware Version 9.17 or higher, then make absolutely sure to use a PROM Chip specifically designed for that particular board. Do not attempt to use an SIA-equivalent on a non-SIA board, or a non-SIA Chip on an SIA-Compliant VISTA board. Mixing an SIA Chip on a non-SIA board (or vice-versa) for 15P or 20P Systems (or SIA equivalents) when upgrading to Firmware Version 9.17 or higher can result in ECP devices not working properly. As long as you use a proper PROM Chip for your system, then no issues should arise. If you are ordering a PROM upgrade chip from Alarm Grid then place your order and be sure to specify which version you need by sending us an email using the email address listed below. If you purchase either the Honeywell LTEIA-TC2 or LTEIV-TC2 or any of our other upgrade kits for VISTA panels, then you will receive all four of the available upgrade chips. Just be sure to select the correct chip for your VISTA PCB.

If you have any further questions about Honeywell VISTA Systems and their PROM Chips, or if you want to learn more about alarm monitoring service for your Honeywell VISTA System, please send an email to support@alarmgrid.com. We're here to answer any questions or concerns you might have. Our hours for responding to emails run from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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We have been covering the 2GIG Edge quite a bit recently, but only just now have we gotten a look at what features we expect the panel to bring. The award-winning, yet still unreleased, alarm panel promises to be the cutting-edge system that we have been wanting from Nortek for years.


This list of features comes from an informative PDF regarding the 2GIG Edge Beta Test. While we cannot show the actual document quite yet, we can go through the list and give our thoughts as to what they likely mean. Again, none of these features are promised or guaranteed to be supported by the 2GIG Edge in its official release.

When looking at the list of features, there's nothing in here that sounds unreasonable. In fact, most of this is pretty standard stuff that we would expect out of any capable system in 2021. But it does help confirm our expectations for the 2GIG Edge as a feature-filled, high-end alarm system. And if the panel delivers in terms of intangibles like build-quality and user interface, then the Edge can still go down as an all-time great security system.

Here's what the 2GIG Edge looks to bring:

  • Face Recognition: The integrated camera is used to recognize faces. This may involve receiving alerts regarding an "unexpected face" disarming the system. But the documentation suggests that the feature may be used to activate personalized smart home features based upon the detected face.
  • Data Privacy: The 2GIG Edge will use "on-the-edge analytics" to process facial recognition without sending it to "the cloud". Other data will also be kept protected. Really, this is just 2GIG's way of saying "we won't expose you". Still, it's good to see that 2GIG is doing what they can to protect end-users and their personal data.
  • Bluetooth Disarm: This will involve pairing your phone with the system for automatic disarming upon detecting the return of your phone (and presumably you along with it). Some timer settings will likely be involved to prevent the feature from being abused. It will likely be optional, as some users may not feel comfortable using it.
  • Geofencing: The panel can arm/disarm and have scenes activate automatically based upon the location of the user. This will likely involve tracking the user's phone to determine their probable location. It is also likely that Alarm.com will be used in this feature, though that has not been confirmed.
  • Smart Home Controls & Scenes: This is likely a cover-all for the smart home automation features of the system. Again, it is likely that Alarm.com will play a role in this feature. It is fair to expect that scenes will be able to be performed both locally at the panel and remotely using the Alarm.com Mobile App.
  • Slideshow & Video Playback: This is a feature seen on many wireless panels. You can have the screen default to show images and have the system operate as a digital picture frame when it is not in use. Our hope is that the 2GIG Edge makes it easy to add photos, as other panels tend to make this simple feature absurdly difficult to use.
  • Video Live View: Up to eight (8) cameras and video doorbells can be live-streamed from the panel. You can stream up to four (4) camera feeds at once. Again, our hunch is that Alarm.com will be used to facilitate this feature. This has been one of the best features for the IQ Panel 2 Plus, so we're very excited to see it available on the Edge.
  • Photo Snapshot: The onboard camera will take disarm photos. No word on whether these photos will be available on Alarm.com for quick and easy access on the go. We have seen this feature on other panels, and it can be fairly useful when set up well. A photo to go along with a notice that your panel has been disarmed can come in handy.
  • Encrypted and Non-Encrypted Sensors: The 2GIG Edge will support encrypted sensors, and also be backward compatible with older 2GIG Sensors. No word on whether the encrypted sensors refer to the existing 2GIG eSeries Sensors, a new lineup of encrypted 2GIG Sensors, or both.
  • Smart Area: This refers to the return of Smart Area Partitioning for the system. Users can section off the system into different partitions for greater flexibility and control. It's a great feature for multi-family homes, businesses, and households with "secure" rooms. Up to four (4) Smart Areas will be supported. It's no surprise to see this return.
  • Built-In Glassbreak: The 2GIG Edge will operate as a glassbreak detector for detecting broken windows. This is a really cool feature that we have seen work great when configured on other panels. The feature will likely require that the panel be installed with a direct line-of-sight to a window in order to function properly.
  • LTE Communication: Both AT&T LTE and Verizon LTE options will be available. No surprise here, as virtually every current security system has LTE connectivity. We were almost expecting a 5G option here, but it seems like that technology just hasn't arrived yet. Still, LTE is excellent for future-proofing a security system.
  • Dual-Path: You can use both WIFI and LTE cellular connectivity with the 2GIG Edge. Alarm.com will most likely require that cellular connectivity is used. WIFI connectivity will likely be optional, but it's also fair to assume the features like camera streaming will require a WIFI setup. Again, no surprise here. Dual-path connectivity is expected.
  • WIFI Access Point: You can use the 2GIG Edge as a wireless access point for other WIFI devices. As Nortek puts it, the Edge Panel "becomes a router". Again this is a fairly common feature. Most users will not need to bother setting their alarm panel as an access point, but it can help you overcome WIFI range issues in certain situations. It can also be helpful when the panel is used in a secondary home where a constant internet connection is not available, but some WIFI capability is needed, such as for secondary keypads.
  • Mobile System Control: This refers to the ability to control the 2GIG Edge System remotely using an interactive platform. We assume that the feature is referring to the Alarm.com platform, but we do not see specific mention of ADC. Being able to control a system remotely through Alarm.com is standard for any system that uses ADC.

And there you have it, the features specifically mentioned by 2GIG and Nortek in the 2GIG Edge Beta documentation. We honestly expect all of these features to make their way over to the final release. Nothing is too surprising, but it's still really cool to see some features like local panel camera streaming, optional automatic Bluetooth disarm, and an integrated glassbreak detector. And the facial recognition feature should also not be overlooked, as it could really offer some cool options if set up properly. Just imagine being able to arm your system by simply staring at it, rather than entering a command. That's about as close as we can get to just using mind control to operate a system!

If you have any questions about the 2GIG Edge, please email our support team at support@alarmgrid.com. We're here to check email questions from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We still have a little over three (3) weeks to go until the 2GIG Edge is released, so stay tuned to our blog for more content. We look forward to hearing from you!

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Alarm Grid is now offering a new "alternate" version of the Resideo ProSeries 7" All-In-One Panel. In addition to the existing Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS, Alarm Grid customers now have the option of the new Resideo PROA7PLUSC Security System. Both options are the same, except for one aspect.


Before you get super excited and full of anticipation, we're sorry to spoil the fun. The change really isn't anything too revolutionary. While the Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS reads "Honeywell Home" across the front of the panel, the Resideo PROA7PLUSC instead reads "Resideo" across its front. Yes, other than that small aesthetic change, these are the same alarm panels, with the same features, the same compatibility, and the same performance.

Why did Resideo bother to do this? From what we can tell, it's a marketing decision. They wanted the brand recognition of the "Honeywell Home" namesake, but since businesses may not want to use a product with "Home" in the title, the "Resideo" version is available as well. Indeed, the Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS is officially the "residential" version, while the Resideo PROA7PLUSC is officially the "commercial" version. We know, it's a bit redundant, but ask yourself this - are you really surprised?

You are free to throw caution to the wind of course. If you want to use the "commercial" Resideo PROA7PLUSC with the corporate sticker of "Resideo" boldly adorning the alarm panel that you use in your residence, feel free. Or conversely, if you're a business owner wanting to bring the comfort of "home" into the office, then you're welcome to use the "residential" Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS with the "Honeywell Home" moniker. It really won't make much of a difference, but you can go with whichever option makes you happier.

You may actually recall that Resideo did something similar with the new Tuxedo Keypad for their hardwired Honeywell VISTA Security Systems. In that realm, you can choose between the Honeywell Home TUXEDOW with "Honeywell Home" emblazoned across the front panel, or you can opt for the Resideo TUXEDOWC with "Resideo" taking the spotlight. Again, that is the only difference between the two keypad models. Now Resideo is doing it again with their wireless panels. Will it be the last time they do this? Our bets are on "No", but time will tell.

Anyway, whether you choose the PROA7PLUS or PROA7PLUSC, you are getting a fantastic wireless alarm panel with some outstanding features. We have already covered the system in extensive detail before, so please check out our introduction and buying guide for the system that we put out late last year.

We must also report that local programming is still yet to be released, so you will need your alarm monitoring company to perform virtually all tasks remotely when it comes to setting up the system. Our understanding is that the systems (yes, both of them) will soon be made to support local programming, hopefully in the coming months. We also have no word on when, or even if, Apple HomeKit functionality will become a reality. For now, if you want a panel that does support end-user programming AND offers a robust integration with Apple HomeKit, you might instead consider the Honeywell Lyric Alarm System, which in many ways is still the superior option.

If you have any questions about the Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS, the Resideo PROA7PLUSC, the Honeywell Lyric, or if you just want to learn about alarm monitoring in general, contact our team via email at support@alarmgrid.com. We are here to check your email from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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One thing we have noticed about the 2GIG GC3e is that it seems to be prone to erroneous Supervision Trouble conditions. This has left some users confused as to why their system zones are not working properly. But luckily, we have some tips to prevent this from happening to you and your GC3e.

Before we give our three (3) tips to follow, let's make sure we're all on the same page by explaining what Supervision Trouble normally refers to. Supervision Trouble occurs when a system does not receive a periodic "check-in" signal from an enrolled wireless sensor. This is usually either the result of the sensor not being able to send out its check-in signal, or the check-in signal not reaching the intended destination of the alarm panel. Some reasons why the sensor might not send out the signal include the sensor being powered down due to a dead or removed battery, or the sensor being physically destroyed. Some reasons why the the sensor's wireless check-in signal might not reach the alarm panel could include the sensor being moved to a new location in the building, or new obstacles, such as thick walls or large metal structures, being added inside the building. Regardless of the cause, you need to make it so that the sensor's check-in signals successfully reach the panel. Once you do that, you can clear the trouble condition. For GC3e users, you can learn how to clear the trouble condition by reviewing this FAQ.

But for the 2GIG GC3e, we have seen Supervision Trouble conditions occur, even when the sensor is powered on, successfully enrolled, and in clear communication range of the alarm panel. The issue seems to be particularly prevalent for the encrypted 2GIG eSeries Sensors that were built specifically for new 2GIG Alarm Systems. The good news is that our research has found that these sensor consistently and reliably work as intended, without causing any Supervision Trouble, as long as you follow some basic principles when using and setting up these devices. In addition to making sure that your sensor is powered on and communicating successfully with your 2GIG GC3e Panel, here are three (3) quick and easy tips to keep in mind whenever you are enrolling or configuring your 2GIG eSeries Sensors with your GC3e.


1) Reprogram from scratch when replacing an old sensor. If you have a sensor enrolled with your 2GIG GC3e, and you need to replace it with a new one, then you should remember to clear or delete the zone first, and then reprogram the entire zone from scratch, this time using the new sensor. Many users will need to do this if an old sensor becomes lost or damaged. While it might seem easier to just go in and remove the enrolled Serial Number for the zone, and then auto-learn the new one, this process has been known to cause Supervision Troubles. It's true that a sensor is identified based on its Serial Number, but you can't just delete the old Serial Number, add the new one, and expect everything to work perfectly. This is even the case if you are deleting a sensor and replacing it with one of the exact same model, for the exact same Sensor Type. Instead, take the extra time, delete the zone entirely, and then program it from scratch. For more information on the process, please review this page.

2) Reprogram from scratch when moving a sensor to a new partition. The same rule applies if you are moving an existing sensor to a new partition. This may be something to keep in mind if you are setting up system partitions for the first time, or if you want to change which zones users on a certain partition are able to control. If you are unaware, the 2GIG GC3e supports four (4) partitions, which are referred to as "Smart Areas", and the feature must be enabled at Q69 of System Configuration. More information on Smart Areas and how to set them up can be found here. Regardless, many users think that they can simply change the Partition Assignment within a zone, while keeping all other zone settings the same, and expect it to then function without a hitch. Unfortunately, it isn't that easy, as not completing this process properly may result in Supervision Trouble. Again, you must clear out the zone, and reprogram it from scratch. The only difference is that this time, you must assign the correct partition number, instead of the one it used originally. Alarm Grid invites you to check out this FAQ on switching GC3e Partition Assignments.

3) Always use the correct Equipment Code for 2GIG eSeries Sensors. The last tip we have involves the use of proper Equipment Codes. Before the rise of encryption, the Equipment Code setting was largely symbolic, and as long as an appropriate "equivalent" equipment code was used when programming a sensor, no issues would likely occur. But since the encrypted 2GIG eSeries Sensors use advanced "two-way" communication, using an incorrect Equipment Code can cause unwanted behavior, including Supervision Trouble. This one is a bit easier to fix, as you can often just replace the improper Equipment Code with the correct one in zone programming. If that doesn't work, then you can take the next step of trying to reprogram the entire zone from scratch. But you should be able to clear the trouble condition as normal once the Equipment Code is correct, based on the eSeries Sensor you are using.

The table below shows the Equipment Codes for 2GIG eSeries Sensors:

Product Name Equipment Code
2GIG eSeries Smoke Detector (USA) 2058
2GIG eSeries CO Detector (USA) 2860
2GIG eSeries Tilt Sensor 2061
2GIG eSeries Flood Sensor 2065
2GIG eSeries Shock Sensor 2066
2GIG eSeries Repeater 2067
2GIG eSeries Translator 2068
2GIG eSeries Water Sensor 2070
2GIG eSeries Thin Door/Window Contact 2862
2GIG eSeries Recessed Door Contact 2863
2GIG eSeries Glass Break Detector 2864
2GIG eSeries Pet-Immune PIR Motion Sensor 2869
2GIG eSeries Takeover Module 2873
2GIG eSeries 4-Button Keyfob Remote 2866
2GIG eSeries Outdoor Door/Window Contact 2865
2GIG eSeries Panic Switch 2868
2GIG eSeries Smoke/CO Takeover Listener 2069

If you are an Alarm Grid monitored customer needing help with your 2GIG GC3e, or if you are interested in starting new service with Alarm Grid, please email our technical support team and security system planners at support@alarmgrid.com. We're here to help you from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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We know that 2021 has been a busy year so far. And things are just getting started! We thought we would take a moment to catch our breath and review some recent tidbits, while also giving a preview on some new things coming soon. Here are some miscellaneous bits of news to take in.


Alarm Grid is now offering the Honeywell LTEMXA-TC2 and the LTEMXV-TC2. These are special bundles for Honeywell VISTA users that include a new communicator (LTEM-XA or LTEM-XV) and PROM Chip upgrades for the 15P and for the 20P. These upgrade kits are good if you need a new communicator for your Honeywell VISTA System, as well as PROM Chip upgrade to support Total Connect 2.0. Remember that the minimum PROM Chip Version for a 15P or 20P to support TC2 is 9.12. If you missed our post announcing the new LTEM-XA and LTEM-XV, then make sure to check it out! These modules are truly state-of-the-art with their ability to utilize the LTE Cat M1 Networks from AT&T and Verizon.

By the time this post goes live, there will be roughly 18 days remaining on the countdown timer featured on the mysterious 2GIG Edge Website. We can assume that the 2GIG Edge is indeed set to make its much-anticipated debut in less than three (3) weeks. A new alarm panel from a leading manufacturer is always something to get excited about. We still don't know very much about the 2GIG Edge. But let's just say, we're hoping it lives up to the hype. If you missed our initial post on the upcoming panel, you can take a look here.

We made a couple of new Alarm Grid videos to kick-off 2021. It has been awhile since our video team has been able to resume their usual work in the studio. We hope to have our team back and performing business as usual very soon. But we did manage to make a pair of videos featuring Jorge. For anyone who missed the latest Alarm Grid videos, click here.

There has been some recent activity in the always existing world of smart home automation. The Z-Wave Alliance recently released the specifications for the upcoming Z-Wave Long Range protocol. Z-Wave LR promises to change the game by supporting wireless signal transmissions from distances of "several miles", while also allowing more than 4,000 nodes on a single network and drastically improving battery life. From what we can tell Z-Wave LR will be a subset of the Z-Wave 700-Series that represents the "next generation" after Z-Wave Plus 500-Series. For more on Z-Wave LR, visit our post on the subject.

A new Alarm.com Camera recently hit the market. The Alarm.com ADC-V515 represents a new "entry level" indoor camera option that offers virtually all of the same features and performance of their higher-end cameras, but at a more affordable price. Highlights for the ADC-V515 include its 1080p recording, High Dynamic Range (HDR), 110° viewing angle, ~15 feet IR night vision. and 2.4 GHz WIFI connectivity. You can read our blog about the camera to learn more.

Don't forget that the 3G and CDMA sunset is getting closer every day! Make sure to upgrade to LTE early so that your system does not get left behind. Our sources indicate that AT&T 3G Communicators will stop working after January 31, 2022. And the shutdown date for Verizon CDMA Communicators is December 31, 2022. In preparation, you can no longer activate a 3G or CDMA Communicator for monitoring service. If you want more information regarding the 3G and CDMA sunset, then please check out this detailed post. You may also want to access the Alarm Grid Communicator Replacement Portal if you are actively making an upgrade to a newer LTE Communicator. Remember, an LTE Communicator will extend the lifespan of your security system for many years to come!

We have some final notes regarding a couple of things to look forward to in 2021. First, be on the lookout for the new Qolsys IQ Hub Security System sometime this year. Qolsys hasn't said much on the subject lately, but we're still expecting it at some point. And if you're an IQ Panel 2 Plus user, then make sure to read about IQ2 Firmware Version 2.5.4 if you somehow missed the recent announcement. And if you were an early adopter of Resideo's latest offering, the Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS, then make sure to keep a close lookout for a firmware update that will allow the new panel to support local end user programming. We still don't have an official date from Resideo, but we are very hopeful it will be made available sometime in the next few months. Fingers crossed!

If you have any questions about any of the aforementioned news, or if you are looking to start new monitoring service with Alarm Grid, please email us at support@alarmgrid.com. Our team is here to check your emails and answer your questions from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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Update: This issue was even more severe than initially realized. The Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus offers no functionality as a secondary Z-Wave controller. More information on the subject is outlined in this FAQ.

We have learned of a flaw affecting the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus and its Z-Wave functionality. The system cannot be used as an effective secondary Z-Wave controller with another Z-Wave hub. This issue has been confirmed on FW Version 2.5.4,and earlier versions are also likely affected.


If you are unaware of how a secondary Z-Wave controller works, it is basically a method to give you multiple points, or hubs, for controlling a Z-Wave network. When setting up a device as a secondary Z-Wave controller, you start by clearing all Z-Wave devices from that hub. All Z-Wave devices should instead be paired with the main hub, which will be the primary Z-Wave controller. You then pair the secondary controller to the primary controller. By doing this, all the Z-Wave devices associated with the primary controller will be pushed over to the secondary controller so that they can be controlled from both devices. Making the IQ Panel 2 System a secondary controller is a popular choice when using the system alongside Samsung SmartThings, Vera, and a selection of other Z-Wave controllers and hubs.

However, we have discovered that when the IQ Panel 2 is made a secondary controller, users are unable to control any devices that have been pushed over from the primary hub. The process will appear to be working, as the IQ2 System will successfully join the other Z-Wave network, but no control will be available for the Z-Wave devices pushed over to the system from the primary controller. Basically, these Z-Wave devices cannot be controlled from the IQ Panel 2 System, nor can they be controlled from the Alarm.com platform. This makes the IQ Panel 2 effectively useless as a secondary Z-Wave controller. We have confirmed that this problem exists on IQ Panel 2 Firmware Version 2.5.4. It is also believed that earlier firmware versions also carried this same issue. But we are unsure which was the first version to experience this problem.

Alarm Grid would like to apologize to anyone affected by this issue. We have already reached out to Qolsys to make them aware of the problem and to learn about a possible fix. Unfortunately, we have not received any word from Qolsys on when a fix would be released. We are hopeful that something in upcoming Firmware Version 2.6.0 may correct this issue, but we have not received any indication from Qolsys that such a fix will be implemented. This means that it may be impossible to use the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 or IQ Panel 2 Plus as a secondary Z-Wave controller for the foreseeable future. Please note that this issue is not believed to have any impact on the primary Z-Wave functions of the system.

We understand that not being able to reliably use the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus as a secondary Z-Wave controller will be a major concern for some users. If you are looking for a panel that has proven to work reliably and consistently as a secondary Z-Wave controller, then we want to give special recommendation to the Honeywell Lyric Alarm System. We have seen the Lyric work wonderfully as a secondary Z-Wave controller when paired with a variety of popular home automation hubs. You might consider the Lyric as an alternative to the IQ Panel 2 Plus if secondary Z-Wave functionality is particularly important to you.

If you have any questions about this issue, or if you are an Alarm Grid monitored customer experiencing any unrelated problems or issues, please email our support team at support@alarmgrid.com. We will work to provide you with a quick and effective solution so that you can continue to get the very most out of your monitoring service. This is also a good email to use if you are interested in starting any new monitoring service with Alarm Grid. Remember, we are here from 9am to 8pm ET M-F to answer any questions or inquiries you might have. We look forward to hearing from you!

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If you're like the folks at Alarm Grid, then you're always looking for new and exciting ways that you can use your security system. One novel possibility is to have your system alert you if your pool or hot tub experiences an unusual temperature change. Today, we will explore how to do that.


As you likely know, using temperature sensors with an alarm system to monitor the ambient air temperature inside a building is nothing new. These devices are used to alert the user to a broken HVAC system that could result in them arriving to a very uncomfortable home, or even worse, major damage caused by the water pipes freezing. But if you want to monitor the water temperature of a pool or hot tub, then you have to get a little creative.

It goes without saying that there are several intrinsic challenges associated with setting up your alarm system to monitor the temperature of your pool or hot tub AND being alerted in the event that an unusual temperature change occurs. Basically, you need a waterproof temperature probe, a programmable temperature sensor that is compatible with that probe, AND a way to interface that temperature sensor with your alarm system. Only then will your security system keep you in the loop if your pool or spa heater goes kaput.

While there are certainly many combinations of waterproof temperature probes and programmable temperature sensors that you can use for this job, we will stick to the products that we have available on our site. This starts with the Winland TEMP-L-W Waterproof Temperature Sensor Probe, which can be safely submerged in your pool or hot tub and monitor temperatures ranging from -58°F to 158°F. It's the perfect probe for the job!

You can easily connect the Winland TEMP-L-W Probe with our selected programmable temperature sensor for the job, the Winland EA200 EnviroAlert. The reason why you need a programmable temperature sensor is because you will need to set a very specific range of temperatures to perform this task effectively. It isn't good enough to just have a very vague range of allowable temperatures here. A standard in-building temperature sensor that monitors for a broken HVAC system might be able to get away with that, but it won't do you much good if you hop in your pool and find that it's a chilly 50°F. Realistically, you will probably want to keep your pool within a very specific range, say 70°F to 80°F. And if you own a hot tub, then that range is probably even more restrictive, perhaps 98°F to 102°F. With that in mind, there isn't much room for error here. You need a digital programmable temperature sensor where you can set customizable high-low temperature limits. And as you can probably guess, the temperature sensor will alert your system if the detected water temperature goes outside these defined limits.

Please note that the EA200 only has one output function, so you can only monitor for low temp OR high temp. But only one probe is needed. If you really need to monitor for both low temp AND high temp, then you can get the Winland EA400 EnviroAlert instead, which has two (2) outputs. You can use one for low-temp monitoring alerts, and the other for high-temp monitoring alerts. But keep in mind that if you have both alert types set up, then you will need TWO (2) probes as part of the setup.

One thing to keep in mind though is that these temperature sensors are often not waterproof, so you may want to find some waterproof housing that you can keep the module inside. Remember, just because the probe is waterproof does not mean that its accompanying sensor can withstand the same conditions! The protection doesn't necessarily have to be anything super high-tech either. You may be able to get away with a plastic container with the probe running through a leak-proof fitting. Unfortunately, we don't offer any sort of waterproof contraption on our website, but your local department store can probably help!

Your last challenge is finding a way to interface the temperature sensor, in our case the Winland EA200 EnviroAlert, with your alarm panel. If you're working with a wired sensor like we are, then the standard practice is to connect it to a wired panel or a converter module. But using a complete wired to wireless converter for just one sensor is probably a bit excessive. Instead, you may look into a wireless transmitter. Many wireless door and window contact sensors have on-board terminals that you can use to connect a wired sensor. This will allow the wired sensor to communicate with the panel wirelessly. You will likely need to provide a power supply and backup battery to the equation when doing this with a powered device like a digital programmable temperature sensor, but that's to be expected when powering the device in the first place. You must also make sure the wireless sensor acting as the transmitter is compatible with your system. Some popular options for doing this include the Honeywell 5816 and the DSC PG9945. Remember to check compatibility if you are unsure as to what will work with your alarm system!

From there, it's as simple as enrolling the programmable temperature sensor with your system. You will actually be programming the wireless transmitter using its auxiliary input settings. Check the device manual to see if there's a specific Loop Number or other setting that you need to use. You will also need to configure the high-low temperature limits and the notification settings on the temperature sensor. You are making it so that whenever the detected temperature in your pool or spa goes outside the defined limits, the wired temperature sensor will tell the connected wireless transmitter to alert your system. Once this happens, a fault will occur on the associated zone, and the programmed Response Type will occur. A popular Response Type for this application is 24-Hour Auxiliary, though you will want to make sure the central station knows that this is for a pool or hot tub temperature zone, and not for a medical emergency zone.

If you have any questions about setting up a pool or hot tub temperature zone for your own security system, please reach out to us. We will be happy to help any Alarm Grid monitored customers with finding the right sensors and programming. The best way to reach us is to email support@alarmgrid.com. We're here to provide you with top-notch support and help from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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When you move into a new home or office, you may find an existing security system that you're hoping to put to use. Or maybe you have an already monitored alarm panel, and you want to extend its useful lifespan. Alarm Grid is here to help determine the best course of action for your needs.

Alarm grid inside security stickers

Most users with a security system will want to have it monitored. When we refer to alarm monitoring, we are talking about the ability of the system to send out signals in the event of an emergency, such as a break-in or fire. This allows the user to receive automatic dispatch from a trained operator at a central monitoring station. It also makes it possible for the end user to receive text and/or email alerts that notify them of the situation so they can contact help themselves. Whether you go with central station monitoring or self-monitoring is a personal decision. You can learn more about Alarm Grid monitoring plans on this page.

For alarm monitoring to work, you need a security system with a communicator that is installed and activated. If you inherit an old or existing system, then there is a good chance that you can get it monitored by simply replacing its communicator. This isn't always possible, but it can save you money by not having to start from scratch with a brand-new system. And for optimal reliability, we recommend getting the system set up with a cellular communicator, specifically an LTE cellular communicator. This will require a cellular monitoring plan, but it is the best way to ensure that your system stays reliably monitored.

Always power down your panel completely before installing a cellular communicator!

2gig ltev1 a gc3 alarm com verizon lte cellular communicator for

There are many advantages to cellular monitoring. For one, cellular outages are almost unheard of when an adequate cellular signal is obtained. The same cannot be said for internet, as internet outages are relatively common. A power outage won't affect your system's cellular connection, as the communicator will stay running using the panel's backup battery. And since cellular is completely wireless, there's no line for an intruder to "cut" to try and disrupt your system's cellular connection. This is far and away the most consistent and reliable type of communication available for an alarm system.

We also want to stress the importance of getting an LTE cellular communicator. Older cellular networks like AT&T 3G and Verizon CDMA are in the process of being shut down. Cellular communicators that connect with these older networks can no longer be activated. But LTE, which stands for Long-Term Evolution, provides a way to "future-proof" your system so that it can stay monitored for many, many years. Most systems capable of being set up for monitoring service will have some type of LTE option available. Many users with existing systems that are already monitored are simply looking for ways to upgrade their systems to LTE so that they remain connected as older cellular networks are shut down. If you would like to learn more about the 3G/CDMA sunset, we encourage you to check out this post.

Honeywell lyriclte v verizon lte cellular communicator for the l

Today, we're going to take a look at many of the popular alarm systems and explain which communicators you can use to get them set up with LTE. Just be aware that many panels will require you to know the system's Installer Code (IC) so that you can enter programming. This is an important step for setting up your system and getting it monitored. Simply find your panel in the table below, and review the relevant information.

Keep in mind that only communicators currently sold by Alarm Grid are listed. There may be other, discontinued alarm systems that we don't mention. And if you're having trouble identifying your panel, you can always reach out to us by emailing support@alarmgrid.com for assistance.

Note: In the chart below, IC is used to indicate the Installer Code:

Alarm Panel
LTE Communicators
Notes
Honeywell LYNX Touch L5000 & L5100
Honeywell lynxtouch l5100 lynx touch wireless alarm control panel
None Available. Default IC is 4112. Can backdoor into programming if needed.

Cannot upgrade to LTE. Replace w/ Honeywell Lyric Controller or 345 MHz Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus.

Both L5000 and L5100 are discontinued.
Honeywell LYNX Touch L5200, L5210, L7000
Honeywell l5210 lynx touch wireless security system with 4 1 sla
Honeywell l7000 wireless home security system with 7 inch screen
Honeywell LTE-L57A (AT&T LTE)

Honeywell LTE-L57V (Verizon LTE)
Default IC is 4112. Can backdoor into programming if needed.

May need to purchase Honeywell LYNXTOUCH-MSD Firmware Updater Tool to upgrade system firmware.

Alarm Grid offers upgrade kits that include both an LTE communicator and the updater tool.

LTE-L57A requires 9.00.209.
AT&T LTE Upgrade Kit

LTE-L57V requires 9.00.201.
Verizon LTE Upgrade Kit

L5200 has been discontinued.
Honeywell Lyric Controller
Honeywell lyric controller encrypted wireless security system
Honeywell LYRICLTE-A (AT&T LTE)

Honeywell LYRICLTE-V (Verizon LTE)
Must have IC for programming. Default IC is 4112.

Firmware update may be required. This can be done over WIFI using the panel's built-in WIFI card before adding the LTE communicator.

Alarm Grid can activate the system on WIFI first so that the update can be applied, and then a cellular communicator can be added after.
Honeywell LYNX Plus L3000
Honeywell l3000 wireless alarm control panel
Honeywell LTE-L3A (AT&T LTE)

Honeywell LTE-L3V (Verizon LTE)
Default IC is 4112. Can backdoor into programming if needed.

All firmware versions of the L3000 support the LTE communicators. However, you need Firmware Version 20.1 or higher to use the system with Total Connect 2.0.
Honeywell, VISTA-10P VISTA-15P, VISTA-20P, and VISTA-21iP
Honeywell vista 10p alarm control panel
Honeywell vista 15p alarm control panel
Honeywell vista 20p wired alarm control panel

Honeywell vista 21ip internet alarm control panel open
Honeywell LTE-IA (AT&T LTE & IP)

Honeywell LTE-IV (AT&T LTE & IP)

Honeywell LTE-XA (AT&T LTE)

Honeywell LTE-XV (Verizon LTE)

Honeywell LTEM-XA (AT&T LTE Cat M1)

Honeywell LTEM-XV (Verizon LTE Cat M1)

Alarm.com ADC-SEM210-VT-AT (AT&T LTE & IP)

Alarm.com ADC-SEM210-VT-VZ (Verizon LTE & IP)
Default IC is 4112. Can backdoor into programming if needed.

The VISTA-10P cannot be used with Total Connect 2.0. An Alarm.com System Enhancement Module (SEM) is recommended if you want to use your VISTA-10P with an interactive platform.

The VISTA-15P and 20P require Firmware Version 9.12 or higher to use Total Connect 2.0. PROM Chip upgrades can be purchased from Alarm Grid. The 15P is here, and the 20P is here.

We also sell bundled kits that include both a communicator and PROM Chip upgrades.
LTEIA-TC2
LTEIV-TC2
LTEXA-TC2
LTE-XV-TC2

Adding an external communicator to a VISTA-21iP will require disabling the system's internal IP communicator.

A VISTA-21iP must be running Firmware Version 3.13 or higher to use Total Connect 2.0. PROM Chip upgrades for the 21iP are here.

VISTA-10P has been discontinued.
Honeywell VISTA-128BPT & VISTA-250BPT
Honeywell vista 128bpt pcb commercial alarm control panel
Honeywell LTE-IA (AT&T LTE & IP)

Honeywell LTE-IV (AT&T LTE & IP)

Honeywell LTE-XA (AT&T LTE)

Honeywell LTE-XV (Verizon LTE)
Must have IC for programming. Default IC is 4140.

All versions of the 128BPT can use Total Connect 2.0.

For the 250BPT, Firmware Version 10.3 or higher is required for TC2.
2GIG Go!Control GC2
2gig cp21 345 front
2GIG LTEA-A-GC2 (AT&T LTE)

2GIG LTEV1-A-GC2 (Verizon LTE)
Must have IC for programming. Default IC is 1561.

LTEA-A-GC2 requires FW 1.19.3 or higher.

LTEV1-A-GC2 requires FW 1.19 or higher.

FW updates are made via Updater Cable or Easy Updater Tool.

GC2 has been discontinued.
2GIG GC3
2gig gc3 diy wireless security system w slash 7 screen
2GIG LTEA-A-GC3 (AT&T LTE)

2GIG LTEV1-A-GC3 (Verizon LTE)
Must have IC for programming. Default IC is 1561.

LTEA-A-GC3 requires FW 3.2.3 or higher.

LTEV1-A-GC3 requires FW 3.1.3 or higher.

GC3 has been discontinued.
Interlogix/GE Simon XT, XTi, or XTi-5
Interlogix simon xt
Alarm.com XT-511-US-DP-AT (AT&T LTE & IP)

Alarm.com XT-511-US-DP-VZ (Verizon LTE & IP)

Alarm.com XT-511-US-AT (AT&T LTE)

Alarm.com XT-511-US-VZ (Verizon LTE)
Must have IC for programming. Default IC is 4321.

Simon XT must be running FW Version 1.3 or higher. Make sure to check the firmware first.

Simon XTi and XTi-5 do not have this requirement and can support any of the listed communicators.

Consider upgrading to a newer panel.
Interlogix/CADDX NetworX NX-4V2, NX-6V2, NX-8V2, NX-8E

Alarm.com NX-411-US-AT (AT&T LTE & IP)

Alarm.com NX-410-US-VZ (Verizon LTE & IP)

Interlogix NetworX NX-592E-LTE-ZX-VZ (Verizon LTE)
Must have IC for programming. Default IC is 4321.

Consider upgrading to a newer panel.
Interlogix/GE Concord 4

Alarm.com CD-411-US-AT (AT&T LTE & IP)

Alarm.com CD-421-US-VZ (Verizon LTE & IP)
Must have IC for programming. Default IC is 4321.

Consider upgrading to a newer panel.
DSC Impassa
Dsc scw457aatnt front open
DSC TL8055LTVZ (Verizon LTE & IP) Must have IC for programming. Default IC is 5555.

Requires FW 1.3 or higher.

Consider upgrading to a newer panel.
DSC PowerSeries PC1616, PC1832, PC1864

ADC-SEM210-PS-AT (AT&T LTE & IP)

ADC-SEM210-PS-VZ (Verizon LTE & IP)
Must have IC for programming. Default IC is 5555.

Consider upgrading to a newer panel.
DSC PowerSeries NEO HS2016, HS2032, HS2064, HS2128

DSC TL880LEAT N (AT&T LTE & IP)

DSC TL880LTVZ N (Verizon LTE & IP)
Must have IC for programming. Default IC is 5555.
Qolsys IQ Panel and DSC Touch
Qolsys iq panel at and t 7 security panel w slash z wave att cel
None Available. Default IC for IQ Panel is 1111.

Default IC for DSC Touch is 5555.

You cannot swap-out the communicator for a Qolsys IQ Panel or DSC Touch. You must replace the panel to upgrade to LTE.

The recommended replacement option for the Qolsys IQ Panel is the 319.5 MHz Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus.

The recommended replacement option for the DSC Touch is the 433 MHz Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus.

My panel isn't listed!

If your panel isn't listed in the table above, then all hope isn't lost quite yet. Nearly any hardwired alarm panel with a phone dialer can use a device called a Telguard TG-1 Express to connect with an LTE cellular network. The TG-1 Express will take over your system's dialer and convert the phone line signal into a cellular signal. This is a great option that works in many situations. Just be aware that you may still need to be able to access system programming using the Installer Code to configure some settings. This can be easier said than done, and many users simply elect to upgrade to a newer wireless panel. But if you are familiar and experienced with the panel you are using and you can handle the programming, then you can leave the monitoring to us. The Telguard TG-1 Express is available in an AT&T LTE model and a Verizon LTE model.

Telguard tg 1 express verizon lte universal cellular communicato

If you decide that upgrading your existing system to LTE is the way to go, then Alarm Grid is happy to help you! We recommend checking out the Alarm Grid Communicator Replacement Portal to get started. You can choose a time for an activator to help you get your new LTE communicator up and running. Just make sure to have your new LTE communicator installed before your scheduled appointment. Click here for our Communicator Replacement Portal.

We've also got your back if you decide to upgrade to a new system. To get started, simply reach out to us via email at support@alarmgrid.com or by calling us at (888) 818-7728 during our business hours of 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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We have received word that Qolsys has released Firmware Version 2.5.4 for the IQ Panel 2 and IQ Panel 2 Plus Systems. The main highlights for this latest firmware update include fixes with the Z-Wave S2 Encryption Protocol, plus fixes regarding the use of LiftMaster Garage Door Control.

We do have one thing to mention for users of the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Solar Integration. If you are using the IQ2 Solar Integration then, DO NOT UPGRADE TO 2.5.4. Instead stay on 2.5.3. However, if you want to use the LiftMaster Garage Door Integration instead of the Solar Integration, then you should upgrade to 2.5.4, but you will LOSE the Solar Integration. On Version 2.5.4, it is IMPOSSIBLE to use BOTH the Solar Integration AND the LiftMaster Integration. Qolsys has said that this will be fixed in Firmware Version 2.6.0, which should hopefully be available in the coming months. For now, if the Solar Integration is more important to you than a LiftMaster Integration, then just STAY ON 2.5.3. This ONLY applies to users of the Solar Integration. If you do not care about the Solar Integration, or if the LiftMaster Integration is more important to you, then UPGRADE TO 2.5.4. All things considered, MOST USERS WILL WANT TO UPGRADE TO 2.5.4. Keep in mind that there is NO WAY TO DOWNGRADE TO A LOWER FIRMWARE VERSION AFTER UPGRADING.

Before we get into all of the exciting new changes for IQ2 Firmware Update 2.5.4, we will first explain how to apply the firmware update to your Qolsys IQ Panel 2 or IQ Panel 2 Plus System. To get started, there are a few prerequisites to keep in mind. Your Qolsys IQ Panel 2 or IQ Panel 2 Plus must be on at least Firmware Version 2.0.1 or higher to apply the update. It must also be connected to WIFI, it should be receiving AC power from its plug-in transformer, and it should not have a low battery condition.

Now, this may get a bit confusing, but stick with us. Depending on which firmware version your IQ2 is currently running, it may be necessary to update in stages to get to 2.5.4. Start by considering which firmware version your system is currently running, and then take the appropriate action(s) based on what is outlined below. The important thing to remember is that your IQ2 must be already on 2.52 or 2.5.3 OR between 2.0.1 and 2.4.2 to upgrade directly to 2.5.4. If that applies to your system, then just go directly to 2.5.4.

For users on Version 2.5.0 or 2.5.1, things become a bit tricky. For these users, you need to upgrade to 2.5.2 or 2.5.3 first before you can get to 2.5.4. We recommend just updating to 2.5.2 and then going to 2.5.4, skipping 2.5.3. For information on updating to Version 2.5.2, please refer to this blog post. Once you are on 2.5.2 or 2.5.3, you can then follow the steps listed below.

Once you are on 2.5.2 or 2.5.3, or between 2.0.1 and 2.4.2, do the following:

  • Start from the main screen of the IQ Panel 2 or IQ Panel 2 Plus.
  • Swipe down the small grey bar at the top.
  • Choose Settings > Advanced Settings.
  • Enter your Installer Code. Remember that this code is 1111 by default.
  • Choose Upgrade Software.
  • Find Patch Tag, and enter iqpanel2.5.4. You must enter the patch tag EXACTLY AS DISPLAYED. Choose OK.
  • Press Upgrade Using Network. If all the requirements have been met, the update will start.

Now, with that out of the way, we can start talking about what's new to 2.5.4. Here is a list of everything you can expect!

  • An issue involving the 6.81.03 Z-wave Firmware Version, also referred to as the 6.81 Z-Wave SDK, has been fixed. The issue caused Schlage Z-Wave Plus Door Locks and the Honeywell T6 PRO Z-Wave Plus Thermostat to not function properly when S2 encryption was used. These devices should now work properly when enrolled using the S2 protocol.
  • Corrections have been made to an issue that arose in Firmware Version 2.5.3 involving the use of LiftMaster Garage Door Control. The integration would not function properly from the panel UI. More information can be found in this document from Qolsys. Also, please see the message regarding the loss of the Solar Integration in 2.5.4 in the notes outlined above.
  • An issue involving the LED status light on PowerG Smoke and Heat Detectors, namely the DSC PG9936, has been fixed. Previously, the status light would not reset after an alarm had been cleared when using Installer Mode or Test Mode on the panel. More information on the issue is available in this document released by Qolsys.
  • The PowerG Radio Firmware has been upgraded to Version 80.34. This upgrade is designed to improve wireless communication, particularly when using multiple DSC PG9WLSHW8 PowerG Wired to Wireless Converter units.
  • Z-Wave Plus 500-Series Z-Wave Switches from Cooper and Eaton are now supported by the IQ Panel 2. The newly supported switches include RF9601, RF9617, RF9640-N, and RF9642-Z.
  • An issue involving PowerG Shock Sensors, namely the DSC PG9935, has been fixed. The issue occurred following a 15 minute placement test mode timeout. There have been further improvements made for false alarm prevention when shock sensors are paired as two (2) separate zones on the system.
  • The 2.5.4 Update now allows PowerG Keypads, namely the DSC WS9LCDWF9, to sound Fire Alarms triggered in other system partitions, provided that the Global Fire Setting is enabled. Please see this FAQ for more information.
  • PowerG Keypads, namely the DSC WS9LCDWF9, can now show special characters on their LCD screens if they are used as part of a Zone Description on the main Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus System.
  • The Energy Optimizer for the system is now available locally on the IQ Panel 2. This is used to set Z-Wave thermostats and Z-Wave Plug-In Switches to reduce their energy usage during peak consumption hours. This feature should NOT be used alongside Alarm.com Thermostat Schedules. It is also NOT compatible with the "Give Back, Get Back" program offered by Alarm.com.
  • Certain improvements have been made to the Help Videos as part of the Easy Install Wizard for the system.
  • There have been small changes to facilitate support of Canadian ULC-S304 for Level II Residential and Level II Commercial Listings.
  • A new setting for ULC Commercial Power Restoration is now available.
  • PowerG Image Sensors, namely the DSC PG9934P and DSC PG9944, now take a picture upon the activation of a Fire Alarm or a Carbon Monoxide Alarm, for EU IQ Panel 2 Systems Only. Most United States users will not have this change applied. Furthermore, image sensors learned into Sensor Group 25 will also produce pictures if triggered while the panel is armed.
  • If the EN Grade 2 Security Settings is Enabled, then User Codes will be hidden with dots, rather than showing the entered numeric code.

If you have any questions about Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Firmware Update 2.5.4, or if you are an Alarm Grid monitored customer needing help upgrading to Version 2.5.4, please email us at support@alarmgrid.com for assistance. This email is also good to use if you are interested in starting new monitoring service with Alarm Grid. Our support and planner teams are available from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you.

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Today, in this final part of our 2020 holiday buying guides, we will be checking out various accessories for the Honeywell Lyric, the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus, and the 2GIG GC3e. Specifically, we will be looking at compatible cellular communicators, security cameras, keypads, and desk mounts.


Adding various accessories to your system can improve your overall experience and make your system easier to use. Most accessories are optional, though there some that are required for setting up new monitoring service. We'll be sure to discuss these factors along the way. The other very important thing to keep in mind is that compatibility is usually based on system. Check and make sure that any accessory you want works with your system.


Cellular Communicators

We'll start by looking at cellular communicators for our top alarm panels. All of our top security system picks have built-in WIFI for communicating right out of the box. But only the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus comes with a built-in cellular communication module. For the Lyric and the GC3e, you must add a cellular radio if you want one of these systems to use a cellular communication pathway. Keep in mind that this is optional for Total Connect 2.0 Systems like the Lyric, as TC2 allows system to be set up with IP-only service. But for Alarm.com Systems, having an active cellular communication set up is required. This means that you must buy a cellular communicator for a 2GIG GC3e to get it monitored. Keep in mind that using cellular communication on any system will require a monitoring plan that includes cellular service, such as an Alarm Grid Gold or Platinum Level Plan.

A good thing about the cellular communicators listed here is that they are all LTE communicators. The term LTE stands for "long-term evolution", and the associated networks and cell towers are expected to be kept running and in-service for a very long time. This will remain true even as 5G networks are rolled out, as LTE is positioned to serve as a valuable and reliable backup option to 5G. At this time (December 2020), 5G communicators for alarm systems do not yet exist. This makes LTE far and away the best option for cellular communication on alarm systems at this time.

You will notice that there are no cellular communicators listed here for the IQ Panel 2 Plus. This is because the IQ Panel 2 Plus comes with a cellular communicator that is pre-installed. It cannot be removed or replaced. This means that the entire panel must be replaced in the event that its cellular radio fails. You will also see that carrier options for AT&T and Verizon are listed here. You should simply go with whichever carrier provides better service in the area where the system will be used. You can also check coverage maps if you are unsure. Remember, this choice will have no impact on your monthly monitoring costs, and it has nothing to do with the carrier for your personal phone. And just to restate it one last time, this is required for the GC3e, and optional for the Lyric.

Here are our top picks for cellular communicators.

Model Notes
2GIG LTEA-A-GC3
AT&T LTE Communicator for 2GIG GC3e. Requires system firmware version 3.2.3 or higher.
2GIG LTEV1-A-GC3
Verizon LTE Communicator for 2GIG GC3e. Requires system firmware 3.1.3 or higher.
Honeywell LYRICLTE-A
AT&T LTE Communicator for Honeywell Lyric. Requires system firmware version MR3 or higher.
Honeywell LYRICLTE-V
Verizon LTE Communicator for Honeywell Lyric. Requires system firmware version MR9 or higher.


Security Cameras

Next, we will be taking a look at various security camera options for your system. Broadly speaking, these devices can be split into two (2) categories. There are security cameras for Alarm.com and security cameras for Total Connect 2.0. If you are building around a Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus or 2GIG GC3e, then you will want to get Alarm.com Security Cameras. But if you are building around the Honeywell Lyric, then you should get Total Connect 2.0 cameras. Remember that using any camera will require a monitoring plan that includes video surveillance, such as an Alarm Grid Platinum Level Plan. The only exception is for a SkyBell Video Doorbell, which we will be discussing later.

The cameras listed here are all IP cameras, meaning that they connect to the internet for remote access. You can use the Alarm.com Mobile App or the Total Connect 2.0 Mobile App to get a live look-in for your camera from pretty much anywhere in the world. Most cameras connect across wireless WIFI, but some use wired ethernet connectivity. For those using wired ethernet, you will often see them listed as Power over Ethernet, or PoE. This means that the camera can get both power and network connectivity from the same connection. Cameras that use WIFI will typically just have a plug-in transformer for power.

Let's start by exploring the Alarm.com Cameras. These are what you want if you are building around an IQ Panel 2 Plus, a 2GIG GC3e, or any other Alarm.com Security System.

Model Notes
Alarm.com ADC-V522IR

Alarm.com Indoor 1080p camera. 113° Field of View. IR Night Vision range of 15 feet. Uses WIFI or ethernet connectivity, but does not support PoE.
Alarm.com ADC-V523
Alarm.com Indoor 1080p camera w/ High Dynamic Range. 117° Field of View. IR Night Vision Range of 15 feet. Uses WIFI or ethernet connectivity, but does not support PoE.
Alarm.com ADC-V622- WELL

Alarm.com Indoor Wellness Camera w/ 1080p recording. 180° Field of View. IR Night Vision Rang of 15 feet. Uses WIFI or ethernet connectivity. Supports PoE if ethernet is used. Doubles as Bluetooth speaker for two-way audio.
Alarm.com ADC-V723

Alarm.com Outdoor 1080p camera w/ High Dynamic Range. 117° Field of View. IR Night Vision Range of 40 feet. Uses WIFI connectivity. Does not support wired ethernet.
Alarm.com ADC-VC726
Alarm.com Commercial outdoor mini bullet 1080p camera. 86° Field of View. IR Night Vision Range of 95 feet. Uses wired ethernet connectivity. Supports PoE.
Alarm.com ADC-VC736
Alarm.com Commercial outdoor large bullet 1080p camera. 86° Field of View. IR Night Vision Range of 260 feet. Uses wired ethernet connectivity. Supports PoE.
Alarm.com ADC-VC826
Alarm.com Commercial outdoor dome 1080p camera. 108° Field of View. IR Night Vision Range of 95 feet. Uses wired ethernet connectivity. Supports PoE.
Alarm.com ADC-VC836
Alarm.com Commercial outdoor turret 1080p camera. 108° Field of View. IR Night Vision Range of 95 feet. Uses wired ethernet connectivity. Supports PoE.
Alarm.com ADC-VDB770
Alarm.com Video Doorbell 1080p Camera. 150° Vertical Field of View. 115° Horizontal Field of View. IR Night Vision Range of 15 feet. Uses WIFI connectivity. Does not support wired ethernet.
Alarm.com ADC-SVR122
Alarm.com Stream Video Recorder. Used to facilitate 24-hour continuous recording. Supports up to 2TB of storage w/ proper hard drives. Not an actual camera.
Alarm.com ADC-CSVR126
Alarm.com Commercial Stream Video Recorder. Used to facilitate 24-hour continuous recording. Supports up to 16TB of storage w/ proper hard drives. Not an actual camera.


Next, we will be looking at the Total Connect IP Cameras. There are only thee (3) models available, but they are the ones to use if you have a Honeywell Lyric set up with the Total Connect 2.0 platform.

Model
Notes
Honeywell IPCAM-WIC1

Total Connect 2.0 Indoor 720p Camera. 135° Field of View. IR Night Vision Range of 16.5 feet.
Honeywell IPCAM-WIC2
Total Connect 2.0 Indoor 1080p Camera. 110° Field of View. IR Night Vision Range of 33 Feet.
Honeywell IPCAM-WOC1
Total Connect 2.0 Outdoor 1080p Camera. 117° Field of View. IR Night Vision Range of 65 Feet. Does not record audio.

Lastly, we want to give special recognition to the SkyBell Doorbell Cameras. These camera replace your existing doorbell, and you can receive push notifications on your phone when someone rings your doorbell. They can also begin recording upon detecting movement, making them ideal for monitoring the front of your home. What's also unique about these cameras is they do not require true video monitoring service. Up to five (5) can be added on a TC2 account, while those with ADC can only use one (1), unless they upgrade to a true video monitoring plan. Make sure to use one designed for TC2 or ADC depending on the interactive platform you are using. Please note that only the TC2 version can be used with the native SkyBell App. You cannot use the SkyBell App with the ADC models.

Model
Notes
Honeywell SkyBell DBCAM-TRIM
SkyBell Slimline Video Doorbell Camera for use w/ Total Connect 2.0 and SkyBell App. Up to 1080p recording quality. Uses WIFI connectivity. Available in Satin Nickel or Oil Rubbed Bronze.
Alarm.com ADC-VDB101

SkyBell Round Video Doorbell Camera for use w/ Alarm.com. Up to 1080p recording quality. Uses WIFI connectivity. Available in Satin Nickel or Oil Rubbed Bronze.
Alarm.com ADC-VDB105
SkyBell Slimline Video Doorbell Camera for use w/ Alarm.com. Up to 720p recording quality. Uses WIFI connectivity. Available in Satin Nickel or Oil Rubbed Bronze.


Alarm Keypads


Our next topic concerns alarm keypads. These devices serve as a secondary on-site controller for your system. Some of these are very basic devices that are only useful for minimal system arming and disarming and showing status. Others offer complete touchscreen displays and allow you to perform a robust selection of security and automation commands. The important thing to pay attention to here is compatibility. Each keypad listed here will only work with the system that it is intended to be used with.

Some common locations for secondary alarm system keypads are near back doors or garage doors, as a user might want to arm and disarm from those locations as they are coming and going, without needing to go all the way to their primary alarm panel. They are also popular for use in master bedrooms, as having a keypad by your bedside can be a convenient way to call for help in the event that you hear someone breaking into your home.

Here are the available keypads for our top system picks.

Model
Notes
Honeywell LKP500
LCD Keypad for Honeywell Lyric. Used for basic arming and disarming. Provides two lines of character display, with 16 characters per line. 32 characters total. Supports chime. Honeywell LKP500-DK Desk Stand is also available.
2GIG PAD1-345
Push-button Keypad for 2GIG Systems, including the 2GIG GC3e. Used for basic arming and disarming. Can also be used to trigger a panic during an emergency. No display screen. No chime or voice.
2GIG SP1-GC3
Touchscreen Keypad for 2GIG GC3e. Supports full suite of security and arming functions. Pairs w/ GC3e across WIFI or using a local Access Point (AP). Offers chime and voice. Mimics screen of GC3e once paired.
Qolsys IQ Remote
Touchscreen Keypad for Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus. Supports full suite of security and automation functions. Pairs with IQ2+ across WIFI. Mimics screen of IQ2+ once paired.


Desk Mounts

Our final category is desk mounts for alarm panels. Using a desk mount allows you to position your panel upright on a sturdy desk or table, instead of wall-mounting or just laying it flat. These devices are often preferred by DIY users who don't want to drill holes in the wall. They are also great for renters who have restrictions on drilling holes.

Of our top security system picks, only the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus comes with a desk mount included. However, the included desk mount is relatively small and flimsy. There is actually a more robust desk mount for the IQ Panel 2 Plus, which is included on this list. Using a proper desk mount makes it possible to perform a complete system installation with nothing more than a screwdriver in many cases.

Here are desk mounts for our top security system picks.

Model
Notes
Honeywell LCP500-DK
Desk mount for Honeywell Lyric. Allows for positioning at 30° or 60°.
2GIG CP-DESK
Desk mount for 2GIG GC3e. Also compatible with other 2GIG Wireless Alarm Panels.
Qolsys IQ Stand
Desk mount for Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus. Sturdier option than the standard table stand that comes included with the system.


Reach out to us!

This concludes our final buying guide for the 2020 holiday season. Make sure to check out our earlier buying guides on alarm panels, security sensors, environmental sensors, smart home automation, and our special guide for the Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS Panel. If you have any questions regarding compatibility, or if you are interested in starting new alarm monitoring service and you need help planning your system, please email our team at support@alarmgrid.com. We will help you every step of the way, from ordering the right equipment, to activating your alarm monitoring service. Our team is available to help from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. As always, we look forward to hearing from you!

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