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Verizon plans to shut down its CDMA (3G) network by December 31, 2022. If you have a Verizon CDMA communicator on your system, you need to upgrade by then, or your system may be unable to communicate in the event of an emergency. Alarm Grid is making the upgrade as painless as possible.

We've posted about the AT&T 3G and Verizon CDMA sunsets a lot! Verizon CDMA users have been fortunate in that they've had nearly a year longer to update than AT&T 3G users. However, the sunset is drawing near, so those who still have a system with a CDMA communicator should be giving serious consideration to upgrading. If you're not sure how to upgrade, this post provides great information.

If you're concerned about the cost of upgrading, we offer financing through Affirm. From this link, choose "Shop Now" and follow the prompts to apply at check out. If you have any questions, contact us at support@alarmgrid.com if we can be of assistance, we're more than happy to help.

You might wonder why we continue to talk about upgrading your system. It's because we know that cellular alarm communication is the most reliable method of communication available today. Internet, be it Ethernet or WIFI is great. It's fast, and when it's available it makes using services like Alarm.com or Total Connect 2.0 much more fluid. It's also very fast for reporting alarm signals when central station monitoring is in use.

But we all know that an internet connection can be unreliable. Sometimes WIFI just stops working and requires a reboot or other end-user intervention. For most folks, when the power goes out, internet equipment also goes down. This means that even a wired Ethernet connection to the internet can be vulnerable to downtime.

With cellular, those types of issues are much less likely to occur. Cellular providers have all sorts of redundancy built into their networks. So, a loss of power is countered by backup power sources for cellular towers. The spacing of the towers themselves means that in most cases, a cellular device will have a primary tower and at least one backup tower to keep it connected and communicating. Cellular alarm communicators either have their own backup battery or use the battery of the alarm panel they are connected to. So the loss of primary power won't take the communicator offline.

Finally, we'll wrap this up by reminding Alarm Grid customers that waiting until the last minute to upgrade your communicator is a bad idea. We have a finite number of activators, and the holiday season is coming up soon, which will further limit the time we have to get new communicators activated. Upgrading from an older communicator to a new one usually doesn't take quite as long as a new activation, but it does require manual input from one of our activators, so please be mindful of this and schedule your upgrade using our communicator replacement portal as soon as possible.

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2GIG strongly recommends that all Edge panels be updated to the latest firmware version, 3.1.1.016. This firmware has a number of new features and bug fixes. New features include Z-Wave siren support and updated remote keypad features. For a full list of updates, read the release notes.


The 2GIG Edge supports a WIFI connection in addition to the AT&T or Verizon cellular communicator that comes built-in. For any Alarm.com panel that is connected to WIFI, OTA (Over the Air) firmware updates that are downloaded to the panel using WIFI are free. However, for those panels that don't have access to WIFI, a firmware update that is sent to the panel via cellular data usually incurs a small fee. Alarm Grid passes this fee on to our customers with no markup, when it is assessed.

But, for a limited time, Alarm.com is offering to update the 2GIG Edge panel automatically with no fees assessed, even when the firmware has to be downloaded via cellular data. That's how important 2GIG and Alarm.com feel this update is. Beginning on Monday, September 12, 2022, Alarm.com will push the latest firmware to all monitored 2GIG Edge panels.

These automatic updates will take place only during daylight hours, and only when the alarm panel is disarmed. When the firmware update is complete, the alarm panel will reboot. This is a normal part of the update process. Additionally, if there are any remote keypads associated with the panel, they will also be updated once the main panel has completed its update. Alarm.com expects the process of updating all 2GIG Edge panels to be completed by the end of October 2022.

If you'd like to go ahead and update your panel immediately, you can access the necessary files for the update on our 2GIG Edge Firmware Update Page. Instructions for updating the 2GIG Edge can be found in this helpful FAQ. Otherwise, do nothing and your panel will be automatically updated OTA by Alarm.com at no charge, in the near future.

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Johnson Controls released a Technical Advisory Bulletin on Monday noting that some PowerSeries Neo, Pro LTE, and Internet Dual-Path Communicators have labeling errors. The serial number on the box appears to be incorrect. Comms built between August 15, 2021, and July 29, 2022, are affected.

The model numbers affected are the DSC TL880LECVZ, TL880LECAT, TL880LEBAT, TL880LEBTL, and TL880LECTL. This is a labeling error only and does not affect the signal transmitting, or Alarm.com remote control capabilities of these communicators in any way. The mixup seems to be with the name on the label on the product, and the serial number on the label on the box.

The model name listed on the label of the product is incorrect, while the serial number listed on this label is accurate. The model name listed on the sticker for the box is correct, but the serial number listed on the box is incorrect. So, be sure when registering one of these units that you use the serial number from the sticker for the product and not the one from the box.

The following products, built during the listed date range, are affected:

Model Name Production Dates
TL880LECVZ January 4, 2022 - July 29, 2022
TL880LECAT July 5, 2022 - July 29, 2022
TL880LEBAT November 15, 2021 - July 29, 2022
TL880LEBTL November 15, 2021 - July 29, 2022
TL880LECTL June 6, 2022 - July 29, 2022

Beginning July 29, 2022, new, updated and correct labels should be placed on these products. Remember, the performance of communicators that were manufactured during this timeframe is not compromised. This is only a labeling error, so as long as the serial number taken from the sticker affixed to the product itself, or the IMEI number from the printed circuit board is used everything should work as intended. DSC offers a handy Date Code Lookup tool at this site. You can find information on looking up a date code for any DSC product on that page.

The fact that this issue wasn't discovered sooner seems to indicate that this is a very minor issue. What do you think about this announcement? Do you often use these communicators? Have you run across this issue? Leave us a comment below and tell us what you think. We always enjoy hearing from our readers. That's all for today, until we meet again, stay safe!

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On July 5, 2022 Resideo announced that all LTEM-PA, LTEM-PV, LTEM-PIA, and LTEM-PIV communicators will undergo a slightly revised activation process. Upon registration, if the communicator is not using the latest firmware version, it will automatically receive an Over-the-Air (OTA) update.

This announcement came in the form of MyWebTech Technical Notification #83. For those communicators with a WIFI or Ethernet connection, the OTA update will be performed using this communication path. If WIFI or Etehrnet is not available, then cellular data will be used. The update process typically takes about five (5) minutes, but when cellular is the only communication path available, it may take longer. The length of time a cellular upgrade takes also depends on the cellular signal strength.

During the update, the communicator's LED's will light according to where the communicator is in the two-stage process:

  • Firmware Downloading: REG, Status, and Fault LEDs will fast-blink in unison.
  • Upon Firmware Completion: The device will reset, then all five (5) LEDs, REG, Status, Fault, Cell, and WIFI/Ethernet will fast blink in sequence.

The OTA software update will cause the communicator to generate a few different messages to the central station. These messages indicate the beginning and end of the software update process. The messages sent are as follows:

  • E903 - Application Code Update (Remote Download begins)
  • R903 - Application Code Update Restore (Remote Download Completed)
  • E904 - Application Code Update Failure (Remote Download/Update Failed)

For Alarm Grid customers, this notice means that if you are using one of the LTEM-P Series communicators listed above, it is more important than ever that you have your equipment installed and ready when your activation appointment time rolls around. In particular, anyone who will be using cellular communication only, as any OTA update required may take some time to complete, and we currently have no way of knowing how long.

If you have any questions about this notice, reach out to your alarm dealer for details. If you are an Alarm Grid customer, you can send us an email at support@alarmgrid.com. We're here Monday - Friday from 9:00 am - 8:00 pm Eastern time to answer your questions.

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The Resideo LTEM-PA and LTEM-PV are dual-path capable communicators that use the LTE Cat-M1 network. During the global chip shortage, these radios have come to prominence because of their availability in the absence of other LTE communicators. They provide nearly the same speed as LTE comms.

Another feature that differentiates the LTEM-PA and LTEM-PV from other communicators is their modular design. These radios are considered a part of the ProSeries lineup, which includes the Honeywell Home PROA7 and PROA7PLUS and the Resideo PROA7C and PROA7PLUSC. The reason for this is that many of the add-on modules that can be used with the ProSeries panels can also be used with the LTEM-P communicators. Including the PROWIFI or PROWIFIZW, the PROLTE-A or PROLTE-V, and the PRODCM.

The LTEM-P Series communicators support an ethernet connection, but if you find yourself in a situation where a wired connection is not possible, then you can install the PROWIFI or PROWFIZW, which will give you WIFI, or WIFI and Z-Wave Plus capabilities. The ability to add a modular cellular unit is exciting as it allows you to install a separate LTE communicator to use instead of the built-in LTE Cat-M1 communicator. This will come in handy if you purchase an AT&T LTEM-PA, but find out later that Verizon would provide a better signal in this particular installation. Also, far in the future, when LTE is eventually phased out, whatever takes its place can easily be installed in the unit, rather than having to replace the entire communicator.

The PRODCM is a dialer-capture module. It allows the LTEM-P Series communicator to work with an alarm panel that has a built-in dialer and can report using Contact ID Format. The PRODCM installs inside a slot in the LTEM-P Series communicator, then two wires are connected between it and the Tip and Ring terminals on the alarm panel. The panel believe's it is dialing out over a phone line, but the module captures the signal, and transmits it via IP, or Cellular. Many of these add-on modules are also compatible with the ProSeries panels, which is why the LTEM-P Series are considered a part of the ProSeries lineup.

Tip 1: Power Wiring

The LTEM-PA and LTEM-PV come with a 9VDC power supply. Depending on the communicator you may be replacing there could be an existing AC Transformer in place. Do not make the mistake of trying to use the existing transformer. You have two (2) options when it comes to powering the LTEM-PA or LTEM-PV. You can use the included power supply, making sure to observe proper polarity with the power wires, or you can wire it so that the communicator receives all its power from the alarm panel. If you choose the latter option, be sure to calculate the current draw for the communicator correctly, and if you decide to leave the battery out of the LTEM-P Series device, turn off the radio's Low Battery Reporting.

Tip 2: Installing A WIFI Module

If you want to add support for WIFI to your LTEM-P module, you can add the PROWIFI module. When the PROWIFI module is installed, the ethernet connection becomes unavailable, so you can only use one or the other of these, but not both. If you want to add both WIFI and Z-Wave Plus capabilities to your system, then you can choose to install the PROWIFIZW.

Using the PROWIFIZW can add Z-Wave support in a situation where it would otherwise be unavailable, such as when using the LTEM-P with a non-VISTA panel. The PROWIFIZW cannot be used as a secondary controller, so it can't be used to extend the range of another controller such as the Tuxedo or VAM. Using the PROWIFIZW also doesn't give you an option to create scenes through Total Connect 2.0, only manual control of Z-Wave devices is available.

Tip 3: Always Default the Communicator

We've found, through painful experience, that it is a good idea to always default the LTEM-PA or LTEM-PV once all the wiring is completed, prior to account creation and activation. To default, hold down the red button on the upper right side of the main communicator board for at least 20 Seconds. The LEDs on the communicator should begin going through their initial power-on sequence. This is how you can tell the default has completed.

Once the communicator has booted completely up, then do one last power cycle. Do this by unplugging the transformer and disconnecting the red battery lead. If the communicator is being powered completely by the panel, simply power the panel down and back up by unplugging its transformer and backup battery. If the communicator battery is still connected though, be sure to disconnect this battery as well to completely power the communicator off. Wait about 30 seconds, then power back on as you normally would. For VISTA panels, plug in the transformer, then the battery. If the communicator has its own DC Power Supply, plug in the communicator battery, then plug in the power supply. Now you can proceed with programming and activation.

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Resideo has reported that Verizon cellular communicators may experience issues connecting to Total Connect 2.0, issues with commands taking longer than usual to process, or failing completely. This is due to an SMS issue with the carrier which began at 11:00 pm Monday night.

As of this writing, the issue is ongoing and could last for some time. Only Verizon cellular communicators are affected, AT&T communicators and dual-path communicators where the IP path is present are not affected. This issue does not affect the Verizon cellular communicator's ability to send alarm signals!

If you have a Verizon communicator and are experiencing issues with Total Connect 2.0, please be patient. Verizon is aware of the issue, and they are working to correct it. At this time, only Resideo has reported an issue with Verizon communicators. If that changes, we will let you know.

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An announcement on the AlarmNet360 page shows that they will send a remote reset command to some LTEM-PA, LTEM-PV, LTEM-PIA, and LTEM-PIV radios. This will occur today, Friday 04/15/22 between 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET. This may cause a trouble condition, and queued alarm reports could be sent.

It's unclear why this is being done. After a successful reset occurs, the radio will send an "E339-EXP. Module Power ON / Reset" message to the monitoring station. If the radio was in comm failure prior to the reset and any unsent alarm signals were queued, this reset may cause those alarm messages to be sent. These signals would show up immediately following the E339 signal at the central station. We assume this would also cause the same alarm messages to show up in Total Connect 2.0, and to be sent as notifications.

In addition, depending on how the panel is programmed, this event may cause the panel to display a bF or Check 103 message, and could also cause trouble beeping from the keypad. Disarming the system twice should clear the message and return the system to its normal state.

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Resideo has been investigating an issue with a very small number of communicators. The LTE-CFV, HWF2V-COM, LTE-IV, LTE-L3V, and VISTA-21IPLTE with LTE-21V. In a few cases, starting on March 19, 2022, the Verizon LTE SIM has become locked, causing a comm failure, or secondary path failure.


A device with this issue will show the following symptoms: Locally at the device, the LEDs will flash regularly at a rate of two times per second (see video above). Through AlarmNet360, the affected devices will have checked in normally for the period leading up to March 19, 2022. Then beginning on that date, or on a subsequent date through March 28, 2022, a comm failure will be indicated. Once the comm fail indication appears, it will not clear, so if you've had a comm failure during this time that has restored, then your communication failure is not being caused by this issue.

In addition to the above evidence of an issue, the alarm panel that the communicator is connected to will have a trouble indication displayed. This may come in the form of a Check 103, or a bF on VISTA-20P and similar panels, and also the L3000 panel. For the L3000 panel, the bF will only show on an RF keypad, such as the 5828 or 5828V, the panel itself will show Check or Fault 103. To silence any trouble beeping, enter a disarm command at any panel keypad. These trouble messages can be caused by other things, not just this issue, so if you see one of these error messages and think you may be affected, be sure to contact your alarm dealer for further assistance.

Bear in mind that only the communicators listed above are affected, and that these are all Verizon SIM Cards. If you have an AT&T Communicator, you needn't worry about this issue. Also, for those who have a dual-path communicator with Ethernet connected, you will not necessarily see a Communication Failure message. Instead you will be notified of a Secondary Path Failure. Again, if you are affected by this issue, once the failure occurs, it will not restore. So if you've received a Secondary Path Failure that has since restored, then you experienced a separate issue.

Again, if you feel that you have been affected by this issue, contact your alarm dealer. They can confirm if you are affected and will be able to assist you in receiving a replacement SIM. Alarm Grid customers who are affected have already been contacted and replacement SIMs are on the way. If any further information becomes available, we'll update this post with further details.

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I was able to speak with an industry insider familiar with the events at Resideo's data center on Sunday night into Monday evening. This person related to me that there was an HVAC failure at the primary data center. It was initially thought to be an easy fix, but that turned out to be false.

Things started to go wrong in Resideo's primary data center on Sunday night at around 7:00 PM Eastern Time. An HVAC failure allowed the temperature in the data center to climb to a dangerous level for the servers located there. The normal temperature is around 70℉ (21℃) but on Sunday it rose into the neighborhood of 130℉ (54.4℃). The servers are set to failsafe, so rather than continue running, and risk catastrophic damage, they began to shut down.

An automated system is in place which notifies engineering and other stakeholders when a serious event like this occurs. An HVAC technician responded. Initially, the technician believed this would be a quick and easy fix, so the decision was made not to switch to the secondary data center, which is located in the Chicago area. The switch takes a bit of time, somewhere around 20 minutes, and the thought was that it wouldn't be worthwhile at that point to make the switch.

However, the HVAC tech discovered that in order to implement a fix, he or she was going to require a part, which they didn't have and couldn't get at that time. So, at around 1:00 AM Eastern Time, the decision was made to switch things over to the secondary data center. By about 1:30 AM Eastern Time, the backup data center was in control.

At around daylight Monday morning the HVAC system in the primary data center had been fixed. Once it was fixed, there was a period of time where the temperature was coming down to an acceptable level. By approximately 11:00 AM Eastern Time, Resideo was ready to switch back to the primary data center. At this point, alarm signaling was back up and had been for some time. By around 2:00 PM AlarmNet360 was back up, and by about 6:00 PM Total Connect 2.0 was back online, though customers and our own testing show that it was somewhat sluggish at first.

This outage affected three (3) things. The most serious was alarm signaling. During the early hours of the outage, customer's systems were unable to send signals to the monitoring station, or to send notifications to the customers themselves. Total Connect 2.0, the customer-facing app and website for end-user remote control was also down. Lastly, AlarmNet360, the alarm dealer facing service used to create or cancel accounts and remotely troubleshoot issues was also affected. When things went wrong, the initial focus was on getting alarm signaling backup as quickly as possible. This was the focus when they initially switched to the Chicago area data center.

This is a fully redundant system, and it is tested regularly. According to my source, there were hourly notifications being sent to alarm dealers, but the database of email addresses for these notifications seems to be outdated. This is something they will address going forward. A root cause analysis will be completed in the coming days, and any processes or procedures that need to be updated will be dealt with at that time. The site at status.resideo.com doesn't have a section showing either AlarmNet360 or Total Connect 2.0 status. Hopefully, this is something that will change in the very near future as well. Finally, those dealers who did receive notification noted that the emails weren't flagged as containing particularly important information. This is also something that will be addressed in the future.

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Today, February 22, 2022 is the official date for the AT&T 3G Sunset. As we've mentioned before, there isn't a big switch that gets turned off and then, "Poof!" no more 3G. If you still have an AT&T 3G communicator, it may continue to work for a while, but there is no way to know how long.

If you're just becoming aware of the AT&T 3G Sunset because you have a security panel that you haven't been paying much attention to for a while, then you probably are seeing some type of error, and possibly hearing some annoying beeping. Some of the more common error messages are shown further down in this post. The thing to keep in mind is that your alarm panel wants to be sure that you know there's a problem. So, if you just press the touchscreen, or press any button on the keypad, that should stop the beeping, at least temporarily.

If you know the arming/disarming code for the system, enter it if prompted on a touchscreen panel, or if you're on a VISTA panel, just enter your 4-digit code and then press the OFF or 1 Key. This will acknowledge the trouble condition and stop the beeping on a more permanent basis, though in some cases, it may come back after a period of time. If you don't know a valid code for the system, then you will likely need to shut down your system by unplugging the transformer and the battery. If you're interested in putting your system into service keep reading to see how Alarm Grid is helping out in this situation.

If you find yourself in the unenviable position of needing to replace an AT&T 3G communicator, but you haven't done so yet, don't panic. The AT&T 3G network is vast and complex. It's not something that you can simply turn off. The process of sunsetting 3G equipment will take a bit of time. So, if after today your 3G communicator still works, you're one of the lucky ones. You've been given a slight reprieve. However, there is no way for us to know how long that reprieve will last, so decide what you're going to do, and do it now.

One ongoing problem that we've seen recently is supply chain issues. Maybe you've been trying to upgrade for the past six (6) months, but the communicator or system you need hasn't been available. Communicator manufacturers have been rolling out LTE Cat-M1 communicators in the absence of available components for standard LTE.

LTE Cat-M1 is the cellular network that was created for Internet-of-Things (IoT) use. It has lower power consumption, better range, and the modems used for it have a smaller form factor. The trade-off is lower bandwidth. However, the amount of data being transmitted by alarm communicators is very low compared to voice and data used for a traditional phone, so the difference in bandwidth isn't noticeable. Happily, the components to make LTE Cat-M1 communicators appears to be readily available, so those communicators have been coming into stock in the past months and continue to become available.

Some of the available AlarmNet LTE Cat-M1 communicators are listed below. These communicators are all compatible with the VISTA panels. The LTEM-PA and LTEM-PV are also compatible with the DSC PC1616, DSC PC1832, and DSC PC1864 and the Interlogix NX Series panels. For the Interlogix NX Series, the PRODCM is also required:

  • LTEM-PA - Dual-path IP and AT&T LTE Cat-M1 communicator with the ability to add a traditional LTE communicator if needed. First communicator to allow non-Honeywell panels to use Total Connect 2.0.
  • LTEM-PV - Dual-path IP and Verizon LTE Cat-M1 communicator with the ability to add a traditional LTE communicator if needed. Along with the LTEM-PA can allow non-Honeywell panels to use Total Connect 2.0.
  • LTEM-XA - AT&T LTE Cat-M1 Communicator for VISTA Panels.
  • LTEMXA-TC2 - AT&T LTE Cat-M1 Communicator for VISTA Panels. Includes upgrade chips for VISTA-15P and VISTA-20P panels, allowing them to support Total Connect 2.0.
  • LTEM-XV - Verizon LTE Cat-M1 Communicator for VISTA Panels.
  • LTEMXV-TC2 - Verizon LTE Cat-M1 Communicator for VISTA Panels. Includes upgrade chips for VISTA-15P and VISTA-20P panels, allowing them to support Total Connect 2.0.
  • LTEM-IA -COMING SOON - AT&T LTE Cat-M1 Communicator with RJ45 Port for Ethernet. Currently in Beta.
  • LTEM-PIA - AT&T LTE Cat-M1 Communicator with RJ45 Ethernet port. Listed for UL-985 Household Fire.
  • LTEM-PIV - Verizon LTE Cat-M1 Communicator with RJ45 Ethernet port. Listed for UL-985 Household Fire.

Some of the available Alarm.com LTE Cat-M1 communicators are listed below. Compatibility is listed with each communicator:

  • Alarm.com ADC-SEM210-PS-AT-M - COMING SOON - Dual-path AT&T LTE Cat-M1 and ethernet capable communicator for use with legacy DSC Power Series panels (PC1616, PC1832, PC1864).
  • Alarm.com ADC-SEM210-PS-VZ-M - COMING SOON. - Dual-path Verizon LTE Cat-M1 and ethernet capable communicator for use with legacy DSC Power Series panels (PC1616, PC1832, PC1864).
  • Alarm.com ADC-SEM300-VT-AT-M - COMING SOON. - Dual-path AT&T LTE Cat-M1 and ethernet capable communicator for use with Honeywell VISTA (non-polling loop) panels (VISTA-10P, VISTA-15P, VISTA-20P, VISTA-21iP manufactured in 2005 or later).
  • Alarm.com ADC-SEM300-VT-VZ-M - Dual-path Verizon LTE Cat-M1 and ethernet capable communicator for use with Honeywell VISTA (non-polling loop) panels (VISTA-10P, VISTA-15P, VISTA-20P, VISTA-21iP manufactured in 2005 or later).

Panel Cellular Communicator Trouble Condition Messages

If you are affected immediately by the AT&T 3G shutdown, you may see one of these error messages on your system:

  • Check 103 ####: - You may see this on a non-polling VISTA panel, such as the VISTA-20P, but only if you have an Alpha Keypad like a 6160. The #### will be a 4-digit number. It may be 4005, which indicates that the communicator has lost connection with AlarmNet. The exact 4-digit code will depend on whether there are any other trouble conditions existing on the communicator at the time the message is displayed.
    *If you have a VISTA panel, choose from any of the communicators listed above for VISTA panels. The VISTA-21IPLTE can use the LTE-21V. The only way to update an original VISTA-21iP is to add an external communicator and disable the internal one. The prior link is an FAQ on how to do just that. The same rule about possibly downgrading to an IP only plan mentioned under the bF message applies here too.
  • bF, or it may look like 6F: - This is supposed to be a bF, which stands for Backup Failure, as in backup communicator. This message means the same thing as Check 103, but will be displayed on a non-alpha keypad like a 6150. If this is the only type of keypad you have, then this is all the information the panel and the communicator can give you. If you get this message after 02/22/22 and your AT&T 3G Communicator has been fine until then, you're not one of the lucky ones. You should look to upgrade your communicator ASAP. *Or, if you have a dual-path communicator and an IP connection is available near it, you could downgrade to an IP only plan for now, and upgrade to LTE at a later time. Just bear in mind, if you go IP only, when the internet is out, your panel's ability to communicate is out. This is usually the case during power outages. The above rule about upgrading the communicator under the Check 103 message also applies here.
  • Fault 103: - This may also show as a Check 103, then display as a Fault 103 after you silence the panel. This is what you see on the Honeywell L3000 panels when there is a problem with the communicator. Losing connection due to the 3G Sunset would cause this error code. There is not a good IP only option for the L3000 currently available. You can use a 7847-I, but it is a messy installation. You can also use the 7847I-L, if you can find one, they are discontinued.
  • 103 Comm. Trouble: - The Lynx Touch Panels will display something along these lines. The icon and message may differ slightly, but the gist is the same. This is what you'll see on these panels if you're affected by the AT&T 3G shut down.
    • Honeywell LTE-L57A: - AT&T LTE Communicator for Lynx Touch panels. Important! There may be panel firmware revision restrictions with your panel and either of these communicators. Read the product description very carefully to be sure your panel is on the correct version for the communicator you choose. If you need to update the panel, you can do so with the Honeywell LYNXTOUCH-MSD Firmware Update Tool. It is compatible with the L5200, L5210, and L7000.
    • Honeywell LTE-L57V: - Verizon LTE communicator for the Lynx Touch panels. See the Important note above about panel firmware version limitations.
  • ⚠ 950 Comm. Trouble: This is the message displayed on a Lyric Controller if it has a cellular communication path, and it loses contact with AlarmNet on that path. This is what you will see if the AT&T 3G shutdown has caused your communicator to go down. There may be other messages in the status bar at the top of the screen as well, having to do with Comm Failure and potentially other conditions, depending on what's happening with your panel at the time.
    • Honeywell LYRICLTE-A - AT&T LTE Communicator for Lyric. Firmware Revision v01.03.06548.482 or higher required!
    • Honeywell LYRICLTE-V - Verizon LTE Communicator for Lyric. Firmware Revision 1.09 (aka MR9) or higher required!

  • Check 8##, ####: - You may see this message on a VISTA-128 or VISTA-250 panel. Devices connected to the keypad bus can be supervised for a connection to the panel, and for a tamper condition where applicable. The AT&T 3G Communicator can also be supervised for communicator troubles, such as a loss of connection to AlarmNet. If supervision is enabled (and it is not enabled by default) then when the 3G Sunset affects the communicator, the panel will display a Check or Trouble (based on programming) 8 + the 2-digit number of the address. So, if the communicator is assigned to address 03, and supervision is enabled, it will display as a Check or Trouble on Zone 803 plus the 4-digit communicator status code associated with the condition when you have the proper keypad to display it. If the only problem is a loss of network connection, then the 4-digit code should be 4005. Supervision is enabled by enabling the associated 800-zone with a trouble zone type, such as 05, Trouble by Day/Alarm by Night.
  • 2GIG GC2 and GC2e Displays Trouble Icon and beeps 6 Times per minute until the trouble condition is acknowledged: This is the behavior of the 2GIG GC2e and presumable the 2GIG GC2 as well. The Security Screen will show a Yellow button with an exclamation mark and a number. When you press the button, it will take you to the Trouble Display screen where you can scroll through the trouble conditions, and you may click on the communicator trouble then press OK. This will stop any beeping, but the display will continue to show trouble until the condition is cleared. In the case of the AT&T 3G Sunset, this means upgrading the communicator.


    • 2GIG LTEA-A-GC2: - Alarm.com compatible AT&T LTE Communicator for 2GIG GC2 and 2GIG GC2e. Important! Be sure to check for any panel firmware version requirements associated with either of these LTE communicators for the 2GIG GC2 and GC2e panels.
    • 2GIG LTEV1-A-GC2: - Alarm.com compatible Verizon LTE Communicator for 2GIG GC2 and 2GIG GC2e.
  • 2GIG GC3 and GC3e Message LED is lit and the panel chimes at ten-second intervals until the condition is acknowledged: The behavior for the cellular communicator losing connection to the AT&T 3G network on a 2GIG GC3 or GC3e depends somewhat on panel programming. In Q30, you set the amount of time that is allowed to elapse with no communication to the server before a trouble condition is indicated. The default is 30 minutes. A 0 in this field disables the supervision feature. The maximum entry is 255 minutes. Q31 also determines whether the radio network failure causes a trouble condition on the panel. This is enabled by default, but if disabled, you will have no visible indication if you are affected by the AT&T 3G sunset. Q32 is radio network failure reports. This is enabled by default and determines whether the panel reports the radio failure to the monitoring station (assuming it is able to do so with the radio down, the panel would need to be utilizing the WIFI communication path for this to be possible.)
    • 2GIG LTEA-A-GC3: AT&T LTE Communicator for the 2GIG GC3 and GC3e panels. The panel must have Firmware Version 3.2.3 or higher to support this communicator.
    • 2GIG LTEV1-A-GC3: Verizon LTE Communicator for the 2GIG GC3 and GC3e panels. The GC3 or GC3e must have Firmware Version 3.1.3 or higher to support this communicator.

Alarm Grid Is Here To Help!

If you're a current Alarm Grid customer and you have purchased an LTE communicator, but haven't switched over to it yet, please send an email to support@alarmgrid.com. In the subject line, be sure to put "I Need an LTE Upgrade". We'll reach out with further instructions and either a link to schedule your upgrade, or information as to what we need to begin your upgrade. Lyric and Lynx Touch users may be able to get upgraded with no appointment, where a VISTA user may require an appointment as those communicator swaps are a little more intricate.

If you purchase an LTE communicator or an upgrade kit from Alarm Grid, we will credit your monitoring account in the amount of the communicator or upgrade kit. If you purchase more than $150 in product, we'll also offer you free ground shipping, so if you've been thinking of adding a doorbell camera, or other products to your system, now may be a good time. The cost of products not associated with the communicator or system and communicator upgrade will not count toward free monitoring though.

If you have the ability to switch to an ethernet or WIFI connection only, you can choose to do that and your monthly monitoring fee will go down. You can purchase an IP or WIFI communicator strictly for that purpose. You may have that option with your existing panel and you just aren't using it, or maybe you were using dual-path monitoring, but now the cellular portion of your 3G communicator has stopped working. Whatever the case, if your communicator or panel supports the option for an IP-only connection, we will be glad to downgrade your service plan permanently, or until you can get the LTE upgrade. But be aware, Alarm.com customers do not have an option for IP-only monitoring.

If you're not a current Alarm Grid customer, never fear, you can get exactly the same deal as existing customers. If you purchase an LTE communicator from us or a kit with a panel and LTE communicator and you then sign up for monitoring with us, we'll give you credit toward free monitoring in the amount of the purchase for the communicator or communicator and panel. Once again, purchases over $150 will have free ground shipping, but any sensors or other devices that you purchase will not count toward free monitoring.

If you have any questions, feel free to reach out to us at support@alarmgrid.com. Our support hours are Monday - Friday from 9:00 am - 8:00 pm Eastern. We will help in any way that we can to get you through this transition. Your safety and peace of mind is our top priority.

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