July 2018 Archives

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Hi DIYers! Are you looking to get started with a brand-new home security system? An alarm panel is crucial for protecting your family and for providing peace of mind. But with the many options available, the decision of which system to buy can seem overwhelming. But we are here to help.

Alarm grid inside security stickers

Our support team has worked with and tested many different alarm systems. Needless to say, we have a pretty good idea about what makes a great security panel. And while the perfect alarm system varies between different types of applications, there are a few things that almost any DIY user looks for. As always, having a system that is easy to use is very important, as it can save a user many headaches later on. This is important both for conducting the initial setup and for performing daily system tasks.

But there are a few other factors that have also come into prominence in more recent years. The design and aesthetics of a security system are more crucial than ever. An alarm system is no longer an anonymous metal box that you tuck away in the depths of your attic. New security systems have personality, and the best ones are pleasing in both appearance and function. The successful systems of today fit-in with virtually any decor, and they enhance the appearance of the home. Conversely, a system with a poor design can make a home appear old-fashioned or tacky. And while we love some hardwired systems like the VISTA Series, there's no denying that they just don't look as fun or exciting as a panel with a touchscreen.

Honeywell vista 20p wired alarm control panel

Finally, home automation is critical in 2018. And this goes beyond just being able to connect with an interactive service like Total Connect 2.0 or Alarm.com. The newest security systems can be controlled using voice commands sent through a smart home device. These voice commands can be used for performing both security functions and home automation functions. We've already encountered many cases where a buyer has based their purchasing decision on the automation features of an alarm panel.

Users should expect these home automation features and capabilities to expand in the coming years. Over time, they should become increasingly essential and standard for a new alarm system. Automation and voice operation will most likely become a way for security systems to separate from one another in the coming years, as the technology is only continuing to grow. The systems that innovate and push the boundaries, while still keeping their systems accessible to everyone will thrive.

Qolsys iq lightbulb dimmable z wave lightbulb for iq and iq pane

Just like in recent years, wireless systems are the way to go in 2018. This is no surprise, since wireless systems are easier to program and more pleasing to use and display than their hardwired counterparts. But what may be surprising to some user is that all of our top system picks were initially released last year or earlier. It just goes to show that these panels continue to impress, even as technology progresses further.

With al that in mind, here are our top 3 picks for security systems in 2018, listed in alphabetical order:

2GIG GC3

There's something special to be said about the 2GIG GC3. And it goes back to 2GIG itself. The name stands for "2 Guys In a Garage", and that's exactly what the company was at its onset. While the company has grown since then, their ideology remains the same - they believe that they can do it better. And 2GIG truly delivered with their GC3.

Compared to some other modern systems, the 2GIG GC3 isn't the fanciest or the most feature-heavy. It's the choice for users who want a sneaky solid and dependable option for home security. The GC3 design is modest and uneventful, and it's certainly not going to draw attention to itself. But when you do look at the system, you'll find that it actually comes off as very pleasing. The crisp white design with two prominent front buttons is simple, yet mature. It can surely fit in with almost any setting. And for many users, that's all they really ask for.

Another thing we like about the GC3 is the level of care that was put into it. The panel is one of the sturdiest pieces of security equipment we have ever come across. Same with the 2GIG Sensors. The latest 2GIG equipment has a certain "weight" to it that helps it feel more stable and secure. Just picking up the panel conveys a sensation of quality craftsmanship. You can certainly tell that 2GIG put a huge amount of love and care into designing their system. That alone makes it one of the top wireless security systems to consider for your home in 2018.

Now, the system isn't perfect. The system does not have any compatible encrypted sensors. Instead, it is forced to rely on the unencrypted 345 MHz sensors from 2GIG and Honeywell. There's nothing wrong with these sensors, but users who want a more secure sensor option will have to look else where. Also the programming menus can have a steeper learning curve for new users than the other systems presented here. And keep in mind that Apple HomeKit support is not available for the GC3.

However, the system can connect with Alarm.com to achieve home automation support with Amazon Alexa and Google Home. Alarm.com is an outstanding platform, and achieving a full smart home setup with the alarm panel is a relatively straightforward process. But a cellular communicator is needed to connect the GC3 with ADC. Having to buy a cellular communicator separately to access Alarm.com does turn some users away. But this is a necessary add-on for getting the most out of a 2GIG GC3.

Overall, the GC3 is your choice if you want a strong and sturdy system, and you don't necessarily mind not having access to every last frill presented by other panels.

2gig gc3 diy wireless security system w slash 7 screenHoneywell Lyric Controller

If the other alarm manufacturers are challenging the status quo, then Honeywell is the status quo. Honeywell has been in business for a long time. 112 years at the time of this writing. And while they haven't always been involved in the home security industry, they have certainly been in it longer than the likes of 2GIG and Qolsys. Honeywell's home security roots actually date back to the 1960s. These decades of experience prove that Honeywell is doing something right. And the company used their experience and expertise to create their latest offering, the Honeywell Lyric Controller.

The Lyric Controller pushed some boundaries, and it presented features that had never really been seen before when it was released in 2016. Starting with the design, there's a lot to like about the panel. Its display is large and colorful, and its touchscreen feels very satisfying to use. The white boarder with accompanying grey accents is pleasing, and its digital picture-frame feature allows users to add a personalized touch for when the system is idle. This is a panel you will be proud to display in your home.

But the Lyric is more than just a pretty face. It was one of the first alarm systems to have its own lineup of encrypted security sensors. The Honeywell SiX Series Sensors communicate using 2.4 GHz WIFI, and they are protected by 128-bit AES encryption. They are virtually impossible to hack or takeover, making them some of the most secure sensors on the market today. Other compatible sensor options for the Lyric Controller include the legacy Honeywell 5800 Series Sensors and the 2GIG Sensors. The Lyric Controller also was innovative for including both a WIFI card and a Z-Wave controller into the system as standard.

So what else makes the Lyric Controller stand-out? For one, it is able to connect with Honeywell's Total Connect 2.0 Service. This platform is designed exclusively for use with Honeywell Panels, and it is continuing to make strides in home automation. Honeywell recently announced that the service will work with Amazon Alexa devices, opening up a world of new possibilities. Additionally, the Lyric Controller is currently the only system that can be used with Apple HomeKit. This makes the Lyric essentially the default option for anyone hoping to use HomeKit with their alarm system. However, it is currently impossible to use Google Home with the Lyric.

Like the GC3, the Lyric does not readily include a built-in cellular communicator. One will need to be added separately if a user wants to receive cellular monitoring. But the Lyric has a few advantages here. While Alarm.com requires a cellular communicator, Total Connect 2.0 can be accessed over WIFI alone. In other words, the system can connect with the interactive service straight out of the box.

If a user is confident in their WIFI setup, and they feel they can forgo cellular service, then the Lyric is an ideal selection. Keep in mind though, if the power goes out or WIFI goes down, then the Lyric will be a sitting duck. For the record, Alarm Grid encourages users to use cellular monitoring if possible. But we won't stop you from using WIFI only. And if a user does decide to install a cellular communicator for the system, there is a convenient side slot for this purpose.

Overall, there are many reasons to choose the Lyric Controller. It is currently the only system that can be used with Apple HomeKit. So if you want to use HomeKit this is the system to use! And the Lyric is arguably the best option for users who are content with an IP monitoring plan and no cellular backup. The Lyric is also ideal for users who trust the Honeywell name. After all, it's hard to top an ongoing legacy of 112 years.

But if you want to use Google Home, or if you like Alarm.com more than Total Connect 2.0, then you should look elsewhere.

Honeywell lyric controller encrypted wireless security systemQolsys IQ Panel 2

Qolsys is a rather interesting company in the security industry. Its unique name is short for "Quality of Life Systems", implying that their systems will improve the quality of one's life. Qolsys is by far the youngest system manufacturer featured on the Alarm Grid website, having just been founded in 2010. So while Qolsys might not yet offer major-name recognition, it does offer lots of ambition! The young company maintains its headquarters in San Jose, California, and its West-Coast ideology certainly shows in its products.

At face value, there is a lot to love about the IQ Panel 2. We have never encountered an alarm system that comes as loaded and as stacked as this innovative piece of hardware. For starters, the IQ Panel 2 is the only system to date that comes with a built-in cellular communicator standard. Yeah, nearly every system has special packages that include a cell module. But only the IQ Panel 2 comes with this standard. The cell module is not an "add-on". It is a basic component here.

That is exactly the type of forward thinking we have come to expect with Qolsys. They know that cellular service is the optimal communication path for an alarm system. So rather than forcing a user to buy this simple accessory separately, Qolsys decided to give the people what they want. Most users will choose between the AT&T and the Verizon versions of the system to access a cellular network. We recommend going with whichever service works better in the area.

And we mean it when we say the IQ Panel 2 is stacked. Beyond the cellular module, the IQ Panel 2 also has a built-in WIFI card and a built-in Z-Wave controller. Right out of the box, the system is ready for dual-path communication and full home automation control. The system connects with Alarm.com, making it compatible with both Google Home and Amazon Alexa. But unfortunately, it cannot be used with Apple HomeKit. However, it is the only alarm system we know of that allows for Bluetooth disarming.

Moving on to sensors, there is actually a lot to discuss with Qolsys. The company produces its own sensors that operate at the 319.5 MHz frequency. This is the same frequency used by the Interlogix/GE Sensors, which have been around for many years. The Interlogix/GE Sensors can be used with the IQ Panel 2 System just fine. As for the Qolsys Sensors, they are split into two categories. These are the standard unencrypted Qolsys Sensors and the encrypted Qolsys S-Line Sensors.

Again, both Qolsys Sensor types will work with the IQ Panel 2. And the S-Line Sensors are the only encrypted 319.5 MHz sensors that can be used with the IQ Panel 2. But it must be mentioned that the S-Line Sensors use rolling code encryption. They are not as secure as the SiX Sensors that use 128-bit AES encryption when enrolled with the Honeywell Lyric Controller. But the S-Line Sensors are still more secure than anything offered from 2GIG, at least at this time.

But, it actually gets a lot more complicated than that. In the very near future, Qolsys is planning to release various daughtercards for the IQ Panel 2 System. These daughtercards will essentially serve as wireless receivers for the system. So the type of sensors that can be used with the system will depend on the daughtercards that are installed. The panel has slots available for two daughtercards, but they cannot be mixed freely.

The first slot will have one of the following cards: 319.5 MHz (the traditional Qolsys/Interlogix/GE option, outlined above), 345 MHz (for use with Honeywell 5800 Sensors and 2GIG Sensors), or 433 MHz (for use with legacy DSC Sensors). Then, in the second slot, a user can choose between an image sensor module card or a PowerG 915 MHz daughtercard.

And we need to stop and talk about PowerG for a second. PowerG Sensors are the most advanced security sensors we have ever seen. They boast a remarkable range of 2km in open air, and they are protected with full 128-bit AES encryption. This makes them extremely versatile and highly secure. Range should not be an issue when using PowerG Sensor. But if it ever is, DSC makes a PowerG Wireless Repeater to further expand on this ridiculous range.

So, long story short, a new buyer of an IQ Panel 2 can use PowerG Sensors and one other type of wireless sensors in a 300-400 MHz frequency. That is, unless they use an image sensor module, in which case they cannot use PowerG with the IQ Panel 2. This might seem very complicated (and it is!), but the point is, once Qolsys releases these upcoming daughtercards (very soon!), the IQ Panel 2 will be unparalleled in terms of sensor compatibility. Needless to say, we are looking forward to it.

And regardless of which sensor type you choose, learning the devices in is very easy on the IQ Panel 2. The system has an extremely intuitive programming process that is very easy for new users to learn. In fact, we'd even go as far to say that it is the easiest pairing process we have ever encountered for an alarm system. Let's put it like this - GC3 programming is easy, Lyric Controller programming is easier, and IQ Panel 2 programming is the easiest. This makes the IQ Panel 2 ideal for beginners.

Our final praise for the IQ Panel 2 System comes in the form of its design. It is incredibly sleek and modern, and its thin profile helps it stay out of the way when not in use. But when you are using the system, it is a beauty. The screen is large, bright and very colorful. The touchscreen controller is also very responsive, and it feels like a joy to use on a daily basis. Whether you're operating Z-Wave devices, programming the system or just arming and disarming, using the IQ Panel 2 will be breath of fresh air.

Unfortunately, there is a downside to the IQ Panel 2 design. It is a more flimsy system than the likes of the GC3 and the Lyric Controller. Don't get us wrong, the IQ Panel 2 is built well enough for users who don't abuse their equipment. But it doesn't feel as sturdy as other top systems. Qolsys is a young company, and their build-quality might not be quite there yet. This can come into play when opening up the system for wiring purposes or for providing power to the system. Opening up the system is somewhat of a challenge, and closing it properly can be difficult at times. We hate to describe a system as "flimsy", but that is sometimes the case with the IQ Panel 2. As long as you're careful with it, then it should be fine. But don't expect a total tank like the GC3.

All things considered, there are many reasons to choose the IQ Panel 2. If you want a complete and total system right out of the box, it is perfect. If you are intrigued by the DSC PowerG Sensors, the IQ Panel 2 will be your best bet once the daughtercard is released. Its thin-profile and sleek, modern design make the IQ Panel 2 ideal when aesthetics are a factor. It's also the perfect match for users who want to use equipment from an exciting newcomer in the security industry like Qolsys. And the system is perfect for new DIY users because of its incredibly easy programming process.

But keep in mind, the system can be flimsy at times. If you can take good care of your equipment, then this won't be an issue. But if you want something sturdier, go with the GC3 or the Lyric Controller instead. Users should also choose the Lyric Controller over the IQ Panel 2 if they hope to use Apple HomeKit with their security system.

Qolsys iq panel 2 at and t wireless security system with at and

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Hi DIYers! Our support team is back with another round of videos. Joe, Jorge and Dylan have really gotten in the swing of things, and they have been steadily working to make new videos. This week, our videos focus on Honeywell Alarm Systems and the benefits of non-proprietary systems.

Disable the Chime on a Lyric

Jorge shows users how to disable the chime on a Honeywell Lyric Controller. If the chime is enabled on the System, then the panel can produce a chime tone whenever a sensor is triggered. The chime setting for the system can be toggled from the main settings menu of the system. The Lyric Controller also has voice annunciation capabilities for verbally identifying any activated zone. Both the chime and the voice settings for the Lyric Controller can be configured individually.


How Many Protection Zones are on a Lyric

Jorge explains how many protection zones are available on the Honeywell Lyric Controller. In short, there are 128 different wireless security zones available on the system. These zones are used by security sensors, such as door and window contacts, motion sensors, glass break sensors and more. The system also has designated zones for hardwired sensors, garage doors and key fob devices. Zones 1 and 2 are reserved for hardwired devices, Zones 127 thru 130 are for garage doors, and Zones 131 thru 162 are for key fobs.


Capabilities of the VISTA Home Automation Module (VAM)

Joe discusses the capabilities of the Honeywell VISTA Home Automation Module, also known as the VAM. The purpose of the VAM is to serve as a Z-Wave controller for the Honeywell VISTA Systems. By setting up a VAM, a user can program Z-Wave devices with their system. These devices include Z-Wave lights, locks, thermostats and more. Z-Wave devices can be controlled through the Total Connect 2.0 Service. Total Connect also allows users to establish rules and scenes for their Z-Wave devices so that they activate automatically with certain system events or based on a set schedule.


Difference Between "Proprietary" and "Free and Clear" Security Systems

Joe tells viewers about the difference between "Proprietary" systems and "Free and Clear" alarm systems. The main difference is that a proprietary system can only be used with a specific alarm company. If a user tries to bring a proprietary system over to a different alarm monitoring company, then it often will not work. This will severely limit their possible options. However, non-propriety systems, like those offered from Alarm Grid, can be brought over to a different monitoring company if desired.


Adding an LKP500 Keypad to a Lyric Alarm System

Dylan demonstrates how to add an LKP500 Keypad to a Honeywell Lyric Controller. The device is learned in with the system through a keypad zone. The keypad will auto-enroll with the system once the panel is in its pairing mode. Once paired, the two devices will communicate with each other for arming and disarming purposes. The LKP500 can also be set up to produce audible chimes and voice alerts with certain system events. They keypad can be used for arming, disarming and triggering panics. However, programming cannot be done from the keypad.

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Hi DIYers! Today, we'd like to discuss the Honeywell LT-Cable. This versatile cable makes is designed to replace a standard 18-gauge 2-conductor wire, and it makes it super easy to provide power to an alarm system. This makes it great for any DIY user who wants to set up their own panel.

Honeywell lt cable lynx touch power supply cable from aboveThe LT-Cable is eight feet long, and it does not require any stripping or splicing. It is pre-prepared and ready for action. The only tool that is needed when using an LT-Cable is a screwdriver. For that reason, it is perfect for end users who do not feel comfortable performing any advanced wiring. One end connects with the plug-in transformer, while the other end connects with the board on the security system.

The two ends of the LT-Cable meet through a plug-in barrel connection. If a user ever needs to power down their system, they can simply unplug the barrel connection to cut the power provided from the wall outlet. The LT-Cable can be used with both AC power and DC power. If using DC power, then proper polarity must be followed. The power cable works with virtually any alarm system that we offer, which includes systems that aren't manufactured by Honeywell.

The LT-Cable is available on the Alarm Grid website. Get one for your system now!

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Honeywell has upgraded Total Connect 2.0 so that users can change the temperature setting right from their Total Connect 2.0 account. Users can choose between Fahrenheit and Celsius. This is great news for any Total Connect 2.0 users who prefer using Celsius instead of Fahrenheit.

Previously, the temperature setting was determined by the address set in the Locations module. A Honeywell System would only display the temperature in Celsius if it was assigned to a Total Connect account associated with a Canadian ZIP Code. If the TC account was associated with a ZIP Code in the United States, then both Total Connect and the panel would display the temperature in Fahrenheit. We have received many requests over the years from our international TC2 users for this type of feature. We're very excited that Honeywell has finally implemented this change!

The temperature setting option is found within the "Locations" section of Total Connect 2.0. This is the same menu location as the "Refresh Status" button, which we discussed yesterday. For detailed information on how to access this menu, please see the previous post. You may need to scroll down on this menu to find the setting. Make sure to press the blue "Save" button once you have made the new selection.

Once the new temperature option is selected, the change should be automatically pushed down to the Honeywell System. It may take awhile for the update to be passed down to the panel. To speed up the process, you can reboot the panel. Once the panel loads the weather information, the new temperature setting should be displayed. Please note that this change will only go through on the panel for the Honeywell Lyric Controller and most Honeywell LYNX Touch Systems.

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Alarm Grid has learned that Honeywell recently added a refresh button to Total Connect 2.0. This button is found inside the locations tab of Total Connect 2.0. While this may seem like a minor addition, it can help customers solve issues without having to contact their monitoring company.



Before this button was implemented, an end user would sometimes need to have a refresh signal sent to their Total Connect account by their alarm monitoring company. This refresh signal would then be forwarded from Total Connect to the panel. Now, end users can refresh their systems on their own through Total Connect 2.0.

This refresh signal is usually needed when an alarm or a trouble indication becomes "stuck" in the Total Connect 2.0 display. Total Connect may not recognize that the condition was actually cleared from the alarm panel itself. Sending a refresh signal will clear this problem. Being able to do this through Total Connect will be much more convenient and easier for end users.

The refresh button has many uses for Honeywell users. Some of the issues that can be solved using the refresh button include:

  • Removing trouble conditions
  • Clearing system alarms
  • Restoring sensor faults

Any customer who encounters communication issues between Total Connect 2.0 and their Alarm system should try using the refresh button to see if that fixes the problem. To do this, simply login to your Total Connect account, navigate to the locations section, and click the refresh button. The refresh command should then be forwarded to the panel set up at that location. Please note that Total Connect 2.0 will not log the system refresh anywhere, and there is no way to view that the system has been refreshed from Total Connect. However, a user can tell that the refresh went through because the status in TC2 will match the status on the panel.

The refresh button is found within the locations section of TC2. This is true whether you are using the website, iOS or Android version. The screenshots below will help you locate the refresh button on iOS and Android devices.

For iOS Devices:

Start by clicking the "More" button in the bottom-right corner of the main screen.


Choose "My Location".

Then scroll down from the next screen, and hit "Refresh Status" at the bottom.

For Android devices:

From the main screen, press the menu icon (three horizontal bars) in the upper-left corner.

Choose "Settings".

Then "Locations".

Finally, "Refresh Status".

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Hi DIYers! Today, we're taking a look at the Qolsys IQ Hardwire 16-S. This is a wired to wireless converter that communicates at the 319.5 MHz frequency. At this frequency, the IQ Hardwire 16-S is compatible with the Qolsys IQ Panel 2, the original Qolsys IQ Panel and Interlogix Systems.

Qolsys iq hardwire 16 s qs7131 840The main reason to use the Qolsys IQ Hardwire 16-S is to use hardwired security sensors with the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 System. This works by connecting any hardwired sensors directly to the Qolsys IQ Hardwire 16-S. The converter will then send a 319.5 MHz signal to the IQ Panel 2 System on the behalf of the hardwired sensors. By doing this, each hardwired sensor will be able to use its own wireless zone on the system. As the name implies to 16 wired sensors can be connected with the IQ Hardwire 16-S. If a user doesn't need this many terminals, the IQ Hardwire 8-S provides identical function.

Another benefit of the Qolsys IQ Hardwire 16-S is that it utilizes 128-bit AES encryption to prevent the module from being taken over by hackers and potential intruders. Any time that the Hardwire 16-S sends a command to the IQ Panel 2, the system will need to send an appropriate response in order for the command to go through. This advanced level of protection is great for keeping the security setup secure at all times.

The Qolsys IQ Hardwire 16-S can also be used with other panels that communicate at the 319.5 MHz frequency. However, the encryption feature will only be active when the device is used with the IQ Panel 2. With other systems, the device will still work, but it will operate as an unencrypted 319.5 MHz sensor. Qolsys also offers a similar device that doesn't utilize encryption, the IQ Hardwire 8. However, this module only supports eight hardwired sensors.

The IQ Hardwire 8-S is perfect for users who want to upgrade to a brand-new IQ Panel 2 System while still keeping their older hardwired sensors. You can purchase one today on our website.

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Hi DIYers! It's time for another video recap. We've had an unusual production schedule for videos lately. So this update will contain more videos than usual. This update covers the dates from July 13th thru July 19th. Let's take a look at what our awesome team has been working on.


General Overview of Honeywell VISTA Programming

Joe demonstrates the basics of programming for a Honeywell VISTA System. This is done using an alphanumeric keypad, like the 6160RF. To access programming, a user will need to provide the system's Installer Code or use the backdoor method. The sections of programming are split up into different fields. Each programming field uses its own unique set of key commands. Users should check out the VISTA Programming Guide for more information on the different programming fields. Once finished, use [*99] to exit programming.


Adding Email Notifications in Total Connect 2 0

Jorge goes over the process for receiving email notifications from Total Connect 2.0. When a system event occurs on their Honeywell Alarm System, a user can receive an email notification to let them know what has taken place. In the Total Connect 2.0 Mobile App, there is a profile section where a user can manage their notification settings. A user will need to confirm their email address before they can receive email notifications. It is also possible to receive text notifications from Total Connect 2.0.


Adding a 5834 4 to a LYNXTouch

Dylan explains how to program a Honeywell 5834-4 Key Fob with a Honeywell LYNX Touch System. This process is completed through key fob programming on the system. The 5834-4 has four buttons, and up to eight functions can be programmed by using dual-button presses. The number of available key fob zones varies depending upon the type of LYNX Touch Panel that is being used. A key fob is learned in by putting the system in its learn mode and then pressing and holding one of the key fob buttons. Each input uses a separate Loop Number from the others.


Connecting a Lyric Alarm to the Local WiFi

Jorge covers the process for connecting the Honeywell Lyric Controller to a local WIFI network. The Lyric Controller comes with a built-in WIFI card for connecting to a 2.4 GHz WIFI network. WIFI, along with cellular service, is the main way that a Lyric System will receive monitoring service. WIFI service will also allow the Lyric Controller to connect with Total Connect 2.0. In order to connect the system to a WIFI network, a user must know both the system's Master Code and the WIFI network password.


Using a 2GIG Go!Control w/o Monitoring

Dylan talks about using a 2GIG GC2 System without monitoring service. By doing this, the system will only serve as a local sounder. It will have no way of sending alerts to a central monitoring station or text and email notifications to the end user. In other words, if the user is off-site, a burglary or fire alarm will probably go unnoticed, and the authorities won't be contacted. It will also be impossible to connect the system with Alarm.com for remote operation. However, for users who are almost always on-site, forgoing monitoring service can be a viable option.


Connecting an iPhone to the Lyric Alarm System

Joe explains how a user can connect their iPhone to their Honeywell Lyric Controller. This will allow a user to operate their Lyric Controller System using their iPhone. The two ways to do this are through the Total Connect 2.0 Service and the My Home Controller App. In order to use Total Connect 2.0, alarm monitoring service is required, and the Lyric will need to be using an active internet or cellular connection. However, the My Home Controller App does not require any monitoring service.


What Does Interactive Alarm Monitoring Mean?

Jorge talks about interactive alarm monitoring and the purpose it serves. Simply put, interactive services allow users to control their alarm systems remotely. Some of the most popular interactive services include Total Connect 2.0 and Alarm.com. Total Connect is for Honeywell Systems only, while Alarm.com is used with many manufacturers. In order to use an interactive service, the alarm system will need to be using a cellular or IP connection. The user will also need to have an alarm monitoring plan that includes access to one of these services.


Arming/Disarming Lyric Alarm System from Phone, Tablet, or iPad

Jorge explains how to arm and disarm a Honeywell Lyric Controller from a smartphone or tablet. The two ways to do this are through Total Connect 2.0 and through the My Home Controller App. Total Connect 2.0 requires active monitoring service for the system. But the My Home Controller App can be used without alarm monitoring. However, the Lyric System will need to be connected with a WIFI network to be operated through My Home Controller.


Lyric Alarm System Slideshow

Jorge shows users how to set up the slideshow feature on a Honeywell Lyric Controller. This will have the system act as a sort of digital picture frame when left idle for a certain period of time. The images are uploaded to the panel through a USB drive that is inserted into the bottom of the system. A user can pick and choose which images to use. They can also decide how long each image will be displayed until switching to the next one.


Turning On the Chime on a Lyric Alarm System

Joe demonstrates how to turn on the chime for a Honeywell Lyric Controller. There are two types of chime on the Lyric System. These are the tone chime and the voice chime. If voice chime is used, the panel will read out the zone descriptors when the sensor is triggered. The chime function can be configured for each individual zone on the system. There is also a menu option for controlling the chime settings for the system as a whole.


Managing Total Connect 2 0 User Profiles from a Tablet

Jorge goes through the process of adding, editing and deleting user profiles on Total Connect 2.0 by using a tablet. This is done through the Settings Menu of Total Connect 2.0. The layout for iOS and Android Total Connect 2.0 Apps is slightly different, but the process is mostly the same. The information from Total Connect 2.0 will be sent to the panel so that the logins can be used. The type of access for each user can also be set from Total Connect.

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Today, July 20th, marks the 6th anniversary of Alarm Grid. For six years, our growing team has provided top-quality monitoring services for customers and proven that the DIY model is ideal for home security. It's great to know that many people feel safer at home thanks to Alarm Grid.

To celebrate, our office will closing early tonight. We will be unavailable for phone or chat support starting at 4PM EST. Any customer who needs support during this time should send an email to support@alarmgrid.com, and our team will respond as quickly as possible. We will resume our normal business hours of 9AM to 8PM EST starting on Monday.

The entire Alarm Grid team would like to thank all of our customers for their support throughout the years. We feel honored to be a part of your family, and we take tremendous pride in keeping your homes and businesses safe. From all of us, we look forward to providing you and those close to you with the very best alarm monitoring services for many, many years into the future.

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Qolsys recently informed us that they plan to release the new PowerG and legacy daughtercards for the IQ Panel 2 in the coming weeks. New IQ Panel 2 Systems will be available with different combinations of these cards so that users can choose the proper type for their existing sensors.

Qolsys iq panel 2 at and t wireless security system with at and Each daughtercard will function as a wireless receiver for the system. The types of daughtercard that are used will determine which types of wireless security sensors can be used with the system. There will be four main daughtercards available for the system. These include three legacy daughtercards (319.5 MHz, 345 MHz and 433 MHz) and a PowerG daughtercard (915 MHz).

We are particularly excited about the PowerG Sensors. These sensors boast an incredible range of up to 2,000 feet away in open air, and they use 128-bit AES encryption to remain protected against hacking attempts. Overall, these are some of the most powerful and advanced security sensors we have ever seen, and we are sure that users will be extremely satisfied with their performance.

Wireless PowerG Door/Window ContactOn the IQ Panel 2 board, there are four daughtercard ports. One port should be used with either a PowerG daughtercard or an image sensor module, while the other port should be used with one of the legacy daughtercards. The PowerG and Alarm.com Image Sensor modules operate on similar 900MHz frequencies. That means you will have to choose one or the other. Likewise, a user should not use more than one legacy daughtercard with the system at any given time, as two legacy daughtercards may cause interference with each other in the 300-400 MHz range.

When deciding which daughtercard is needed, users should verify the type of any existing wireless equipment and consider future expansion. The wireless frequency and sensor matrix is as follows:

  • 319.5 MHz: Legacy Interlogix/GE and all Qolsys Sensors (319 and S-Line!)
  • 345 MHz: Legacy Honeywell (5800 series) and 2GIG Sensors
  • 433 MHz: Legacy DSC Sensors
  • 915 MHz: PowerG Sensors

Since only one legacy daughtercard can be used, it will not be possible to use multiple types of legacy sensors with the system (except for Honeywell and 2GIG since they operate on the same 345MHz frequency and use the same daughtercard). For example, a user would not be able to simultaneously use older Honeywell 5800 Series Sensors and Interlogix Sensors at the same time. However, a wireless converter will likely be able to overcome this issue.

Qolsys has informed us that the daughtercards will not be available for individual purchase. Instead, they can be obtained by purchasing a new IQ Panel 2 System. According to Qolsys, the following versions of the system will be available:

  • IQ Panel 2 with PowerG and Legacy 319.5
  • IQ Panel 2 with PowerG and Legacy 345
  • IQ Panel 2 with PowerG and Legacy 433

Additionally, each of these options will be split into two further options for AT&T and Verizon LTE cellular communicators. These will both operate with Alarm.com and open up a world of possibilities with the dexterity of the Alarm.com ecosystem. According to Qolsys, these systems will be available in September 2018. We'll make sure to keep you updated with any further news on these exciting new products!

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Honeywell has informed us that there is currently a problem with their Total Connect 2.0 service. Until the issue is properly resolved by Honeywell, users may experience longer than expected delays or intermittent failures in processing Total Connect 2.0 security and automation commands.

Our team may also experience difficulties pushing information down to Honeywell panels until the error is corrected. Fortunately, alarm services are not affected by this issue. Any alarm event that occurs on a system will still be received by AlarmNet360 and properly routed to a central station and/or the end user. But users should be aware that commands sent through Total Connect 2.0 to their panel may not work properly during this time. This includes any arming/disarming commands and home automation commands.

Honeywell says that they are currently working on this issue, and it should hopefully be resolved shortly. We will update this post when we have more information available.

Update: Honeywell has resolved this issue, and Total Connect should now be working properly.

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