January 2021 Archives

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We have learned that the Honeywell 5877 Garage Door Relay has been discontinued, effective immediately. This leaves the Honeywell Lyric and the Honeywell LYNX Touch Panels with no viable option for a smart garage door controller. The associated Honeywell GDCK Kit is also discontinued.

The Honeywell 5877 was widely seen as one of the most important automation accessories for the Lyric and LYNX Touch Systems. Thanks to this module, a user could integrate their garage door motor with their wireless Honeywell Alarm System and the Total Connect 2.0 platform. This allowed users to open and close their garage doors from anywhere using TC2, and they could also use the platform to check its current OPEN or CLOSED status when a separate garage door sensor was used. Users could also include their garage doors with smart scenes for automatic operation based on a schedule or with predetermined events.

With the 5877 being discontinued, there is no longer a viable method for setting up a Lyric or LYNX Touch System for local garage door control. The decision by Resideo to discontinue the Honeywell 5877 does not strike us as a big surprise. An increasing number of users have been finding good alternatives to the 5877 lately. One example is the Chamberlain and LiftMaster Integration for Total Connect 2.0. While this server-to-server integration does not allow for local control of the garage door at the security panel, being able to control the garage door remotely from TC2 is considered by most users to be more important. You can learn more about that integration here. The 5877 also has a big limitation, in that it does not work with the increasingly popular LiftMaster MyQ Garage Motors.

It is also important to note that the Lyric and LYNX Touch Systems are not compatible with most third-party Z-Wave garage door openers. This somewhat forced Lyric and LYNX Touch users to go with the first-party 5877 device from Resideo, rather than buying a third-party device that they do not manufacture. But the game has been changed with the newest Resideo System, the Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS. This new system offers a much wider selection of possible integrations. For example, Alarm Grid offers the popular GoControl GD00Z-8-GC Z-Wave Plus Garage Door Opener, which is often used with various Alarm.com Security Panels. That unit works with the PROA7PLUS, but not the Lyric and LYNX Touch Systems. The bottom line is that fewer people were buying the Honeywell 5877, and Resideo decided it was no longer in their best interest to continue manufacturing it.

Of course, the unfortunate result of this is that the Lyric and LYNX Touch Panels do not have a good option for smart garage door control. If you have an existing Honeywell 5877 Module, then it will continue to work fine. Or if you find a used one somewhere, then that should also be okay for setting up new service. The other components of the Honeywell GDCK Kit are still available, including the Honeywell 5822T for monitoring a garage door's current status. But if you were in the market for a new 5877 for an existing Lyric or LYNX Touch, then we are sorry to say that you are out of luck. You should try finding a used model if possible, or you may consider upgrading to a newer alarm system.

This truly represents the end of an era, as the Honeywell 5877 was a mainstay accessory for the longest time. But all good things must come to an end. If you have any questions about the discontinued 5877, or if you need help integrating your alarm system with your garage door, then please email us at support@alarmgrid.com. Being able to control your garage door remotely is a great perk of alarm monitoring service, and we are here to help you explore your remaining options. Our team is here to answer your questions from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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One of the more interesting things about the Honeywell Home PROSIX Sensor lineup is that it features two (2) different "mini" door and window sensors. These are the Honeywell Home PROSIXMINI and the Honeywell Home PROSIXMINI2. Today, we will be comparing and contrasting these sensors.


When the Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS Alarm Panel first hit the market, a new lineup of sensors also made their debut. These are the Honeywell Home PROSIX Sensors, and they make the perfect complement to Resideo's latest security system. These devices are best-known for their 128-bit AES encryption and their improved wireless range over the Honeywell and Resideo Sensors that came before them. The PROSIX Sensors can only be used with the PROA7PLUS, and until Resideo makes local programming available for the system, you will need the help of your monitoring company to enroll any new sensor.

At first glance, the PROSIX Sensor Family seems pretty straightforward. It is a very robust lineup, featuring everything from security sensors like motion detectors and glassbreak listeners, to environmental sensors like flood sensors and temperature sensors. But there is one anomaly that often makes people turn heads. That is the presence of two (2) different "mini" door and window contact sensors, the PROSIXMINI and the PROSIXMINI2. Both are surface-mounted contact sensors, and both monitor an interior door or window for opening and closing. A third sensor in the lineup, the PROSIXCT also accomplishes the same task, but that sensor is considerably larger and features an auxiliary input to provide wireless transmitter functionality. But it begs the question - why is there both a PROSIXMINI and a PROSIXMINI2?

Starting with the PROSIXMINI, this sensor actually looks virtually identical to the Honeywell SiXMINICT from the Honeywell SiX Series Lineup made popular by the Lyric Controller. It's likely that Resideo took the same plastic casing from the SiXMINICT and repurposed it for the PROSIXMINI. And when compared the alternative option from the same sensor generation, the PROSIXMINI2, the only category where the PROSIXMINI "wins" is in size. The PROSIXMINI (2.44"L x 1.25"W x 0.45"D) is the smaller and more discrete sensor when compared with the larger and slightly bulkier PROSIXMINI2 (2.9"L x 1.15"W x 0.75"D). The reason why the PROSIXMINI is able to maintain a smaller profile and relatively "flat" design is thanks to its use of a CR2450 coin battery. Meanwhile, the PROSIXMINI2 uses a CR2 battery, which has a more traditional, cylindrical shape,

But before you go declaring the PROSIXMINI to be the winner, you might to consider the fact that the PROSIXMINI2 outshines its smaller and flatter competitor in virtually every other possible aspect. The PROSIXMINI2 has a wireless range of 500+ feet in open air, while the PROSIXIMINI is limited to 200+ feet. The PROSIXMINI2 also wins in the battle of battery life, as its lithium CR2 battery should last about seven (7) years before a replacement is needed. The lithium CR2450 battery inside the PROSIXMINI can only be counted on for about five (5) years. Also, some equipment testing has shown that the use of coin cell batteries inside a sensor can be problematic. It's likely that Resideo wanted to give users an alternative option that uses a more trustworthy battery.


Now, you're likely wondering, which sensor should you get? The PROSIXMINI or the PROSIXMINI2? If aesthetics are the single most important concern to you, and you simply want the smallest and most discreet sensor, the you can make a case for the PROSIXMINI. But if you ask us, we think the PROSIXMINI2 is the superior option, because of its improved signal range, extended battery life, and more reliable battery performance in general. But rest assured, both the PROSIXMINI and the PROSIXMINI2 should work very well on any PROA7PLUS Security System.

If you need help deciding on sensors for your system, or if you are an Alarm Grid monitored customer needing us to help you enroll new sensors with your PROA7PLUS, please email us at support@alarmgrid.com. This is also a good email to use if you are interested in starting new monitoring service with Alarm Grid. We're here to check your emails from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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Due to a technical issue, Alarm Grid is currently unable to receive incoming phone calls. This is due to a Twilio outage that prevents the TalkDesk service from working properly. For now, we are only able to place our own phone calls. We apologize for any inconvenience to our customers.

If you need to contact Alarm Grid, then emailing us at support@alarmgrid.com is still a viable option as usual. You may also try using the Chat function found on various pages throughout the Alarm Grid website. We will provide an update when our regular phone service is restored. Our hope is that the issue will be resolved soon. Keep checking our blog for updates. As a reminder, you can subscribe to our blog using Feedburner service.

Update: Our phone service is believed to be working as usual again.

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We know that 2021 has been a busy year so far. And things are just getting started! We thought we would take a moment to catch our breath and review some recent tidbits, while also giving a preview on some new things coming soon. Here are some miscellaneous bits of news to take in.


Alarm Grid is now offering the Honeywell LTEMXA-TC2 and the LTEMXV-TC2. These are special bundles for Honeywell VISTA users that include a new communicator (LTEM-XA or LTEM-XV) and PROM Chip upgrades for the 15P and for the 20P. These upgrade kits are good if you need a new communicator for your Honeywell VISTA System, as well as PROM Chip upgrade to support Total Connect 2.0. Remember that the minimum PROM Chip Version for a 15P or 20P to support TC2 is 9.12. If you missed our post announcing the new LTEM-XA and LTEM-XV, then make sure to check it out! These modules are truly state-of-the-art with their ability to utilize the LTE Cat M1 Networks from AT&T and Verizon.

By the time this post goes live, there will be roughly 18 days remaining on the countdown timer featured on the mysterious 2GIG Edge Website. We can assume that the 2GIG Edge is indeed set to make its much-anticipated debut in less than three (3) weeks. A new alarm panel from a leading manufacturer is always something to get excited about. We still don't know very much about the 2GIG Edge. But let's just say, we're hoping it lives up to the hype. If you missed our initial post on the upcoming panel, you can take a look here.

We made a couple of new Alarm Grid videos to kick-off 2021. It has been awhile since our video team has been able to resume their usual work in the studio. We hope to have our team back and performing business as usual very soon. But we did manage to make a pair of videos featuring Jorge. For anyone who missed the latest Alarm Grid videos, click here.

There has been some recent activity in the always existing world of smart home automation. The Z-Wave Alliance recently released the specifications for the upcoming Z-Wave Long Range protocol. Z-Wave LR promises to change the game by supporting wireless signal transmissions from distances of "several miles", while also allowing more than 4,000 nodes on a single network and drastically improving battery life. From what we can tell Z-Wave LR will be a subset of the Z-Wave 700-Series that represents the "next generation" after Z-Wave Plus 500-Series. For more on Z-Wave LR, visit our post on the subject.

A new Alarm.com Camera recently hit the market. The Alarm.com ADC-V515 represents a new "entry level" indoor camera option that offers virtually all of the same features and performance of their higher-end cameras, but at a more affordable price. Highlights for the ADC-V515 include its 1080p recording, High Dynamic Range (HDR), 110° viewing angle, ~15 feet IR night vision. and 2.4 GHz WIFI connectivity. You can read our blog about the camera to learn more.

Don't forget that the 3G and CDMA sunset is getting closer every day! Make sure to upgrade to LTE early so that your system does not get left behind. Our sources indicate that AT&T 3G Communicators will stop working after January 31, 2022. And the shutdown date for Verizon CDMA Communicators is December 31, 2022. In preparation, you can no longer activate a 3G or CDMA Communicator for monitoring service. If you want more information regarding the 3G and CDMA sunset, then please check out this detailed post. You may also want to access the Alarm Grid Communicator Replacement Portal if you are actively making an upgrade to a newer LTE Communicator. Remember, an LTE Communicator will extend the lifespan of your security system for many years to come!

We have some final notes regarding a couple of things to look forward to in 2021. First, be on the lookout for the new Qolsys IQ Hub Security System sometime this year. Qolsys hasn't said much on the subject lately, but we're still expecting it at some point. And if you're an IQ Panel 2 Plus user, then make sure to read about IQ2 Firmware Version 2.5.4 if you somehow missed the recent announcement. And if you were an early adopter of Resideo's latest offering, the Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS, then make sure to keep a close lookout for a firmware update that will allow the new panel to support local end user programming. We still don't have an official date from Resideo, but we are very hopeful it will be made available sometime in the next few months. Fingers crossed!

If you have any questions about any of the aforementioned news, or if you are looking to start new monitoring service with Alarm Grid, please email us at support@alarmgrid.com. Our team is here to check your emails and answer your questions from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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We have learned of a flaw affecting the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus and its Z-Wave functionality. The system cannot be used as an effective secondary Z-Wave controller with another Z-Wave hub. This issue has been confirmed on FW Version 2.5.4,and earlier versions are also likely affected.


If you are unaware of how a secondary Z-Wave controller works, it is basically a method to give you multiple points, or hubs, for controlling a Z-Wave network. When setting up a device as a secondary Z-Wave controller, you start by clearing all Z-Wave devices from that hub. All Z-Wave devices should instead be paired with the main hub, which will be the primary Z-Wave controller. You then pair the secondary controller to the primary controller. By doing this, all the Z-Wave devices associated with the primary controller will be pushed over to the secondary controller so that they can be controlled from both devices. Making the IQ Panel 2 System a secondary controller is a popular choice when using the system alongside Samsung SmartThings, Vera, and a selection of other Z-Wave controllers and hubs.

However, we have discovered that when the IQ Panel 2 is made a secondary controller, users are unable to control any devices that have been pushed over from the primary hub. The process will appear to be working, as the IQ2 System will successfully join the other Z-Wave network, but no control will be available for the Z-Wave devices pushed over to the system from the primary controller. Basically, these Z-Wave devices cannot be controlled from the IQ Panel 2 System, nor can they be controlled from the Alarm.com platform. This makes the IQ Panel 2 effectively useless as a secondary Z-Wave controller. We have confirmed that this problem exists on IQ Panel 2 Firmware Version 2.5.4. It is also believed that earlier firmware versions also carried this same issue. But we are unsure which was the first version to experience this problem.

Alarm Grid would like to apologize to anyone affected by this issue. We have already reached out to Qolsys to make them aware of the problem and to learn about a possible fix. Unfortunately, we have not received any word from Qolsys on when a fix would be released. We are hopeful that something in upcoming Firmware Version 2.6.0 may correct this issue, but we have not received any indication from Qolsys that such a fix will be implemented. This means that it may be impossible to use the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 or IQ Panel 2 Plus as a secondary Z-Wave controller for the foreseeable future. Please note that this issue is not believed to have any impact on the primary Z-Wave functions of the system.

We understand that not being able to reliably use the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus as a secondary Z-Wave controller will be a major concern for some users. If you are looking for a panel that has proven to work reliably and consistently as a secondary Z-Wave controller, then we want to give special recommendation to the Honeywell Lyric Alarm System. We have seen the Lyric work wonderfully as a secondary Z-Wave controller when paired with a variety of popular home automation hubs. You might consider the Lyric as an alternative to the IQ Panel 2 Plus if secondary Z-Wave functionality is particularly important to you.

If you have any questions about this issue, or if you are an Alarm Grid monitored customer experiencing any unrelated problems or issues, please email our support team at support@alarmgrid.com. We will work to provide you with a quick and effective solution so that you can continue to get the very most out of your monitoring service. This is also a good email to use if you are interested in starting any new monitoring service with Alarm Grid. Remember, we are here from 9am to 8pm ET M-F to answer any questions or inquiries you might have. We look forward to hearing from you!

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If you haven't been keeping an eye on the Alarm Grid YouTube Channel, then you may have missed the two (2) new videos we uploaded last week. It has been awhile since our last video recap, so we wanted to give these a special highlight. We hope to be back in the studio regularly very soon!


Before we focus on the new videos, we have some good news and bad news. The bad news is that it may still be a few more weeks before we are able to really start concentrating on them again and begin putting them out like we used to. Our Florida office is in a state of flux right now behind the scenes, and while this should have no impact on our ability to provide you with top-quality service, it does impact our ability to shoot, edit, and upload new videos. And once we are back doing videos, keep in mind that it may take us another week or two to really "shake off the rust" and get back in the swing of things. We ask for your patience during this time, and we apologize that we haven't been able to give you the new videos that you have come to expect from us.

But the good news is that we expect new videos to return very soon, with all of your favorite faces, and maybe even some new ones at some point in 2021. We know we're off to a bit of a slow start, but we truly believe that this can be the best year yet for the Alarm Grid Video Team. There are some great ideas sitting in the bin, and we're very eager and excited to put them out. We just ask for some patience as we work to get things set up. It won't be long until you're checking out new videos every week to get the most out of your security system!

With that out of the way, let's take a look at the two (2) new videos we have for you today. These are the very first Alarm Grid videos of 2021, and they cover some great topics. We only had time to get Jorge into the Alarm Grid studio, so he's the star of both of these videos. Special thanks to Jorge and our video team for rallying and putting these together. We know that two videos isn't very much, but we hope that these can at least hold you over until we make a full return to the studio and really begin reminding everyone just what our team is capable of accomplishing. But enough stalling. Here are the newest Alarm Grid videos!

Troubleshooting a Lyric Using Apple HomeKit

Jorge provides some troubleshooting tips for a Honeywell Lyric System that is using Apple HomeKit. The HomeKit integration for the Lyric allows you to receive a limited selection of Lyric System Alerts from the HomeKit platform on your iOS device, and perform various system functions using spoken Siri voice commands. To start using the HomeKit integration, your Lyric System must be activated for monitoring service, as HomeKit functionality can only be enabled remotely by your alarm monitoring company. HomeKit service is usually used to supplement Total Connect 2.0, as TC2 provides greater detail regarding system activity and faulted zones than HomeKit.


Entering Programming On a Partitioned IQ Panel 2 Plus

Jorge shows you the differences that occur when you go to enter programming on a Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus system that has partitions enabled, versus one that does not. Alarm system partitions are used to section off a single system into multiple "areas" that can be armed and disarmed independently from one another. When you have partitions enabled on the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus, you are asked to provide a code before you even access the main screen. The code you enter will determine your level of authority. You will only need to provide a code again if your originally entered code lacks the authority to access a particular menu or setting. But if partitions are not enabled, then you won't need to provide a code unless you attempt to access menu options with restricted access, such as the Installation Menu.

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Resideo has confirmed that the Verizon CDMA Sunset date is December 31, 2022. After that date, Verizon CDMA Communicators for security systems will no longer function. You must replace your panel's cellular communicator before that time to avoid any interruptions to your monitoring service.


In an effort to dispel any false rumors and/or misinformation, Resideo is reconfirming the Verizon CDMA Sunset for alarm panels to be at the end of 2022. The reason why Resideo found it necessary to confirm this shutdown date is because most CDMA Communicators for cell phones had a shutdown date to stop working after December 2020. This date was originally set for the end of December 2019, but it was later pushed back to the end of 2020. However, Resideo has a special agreement with Verizon to keep alarm system CDMA Communicators operational until December 31, 2022. Additionally, the largely equivalent AT&T 3G Communicators for alarm systems are set to stop working after January 31, 2022. This is according to a banner posted on the Resideo AlarmNet website.

The big thing to take away here is that nothing has changed. The 3G and CDMA Sunset impacting the security industry is still on-track to occur next year, in 2022. For AT&T 3G Communicators, this will take effect following January 31, 2022. For Verizon CDMA Communicators, the key date is December 31, 2022. In preparation for these dates, any 3G, 4G, or CDMA radio can no longer be activated for monitoring service. If you deactivate these modules for any reason, you will not be able to reactivate them. But if no changes are made, then they should continue to function until their associated shut-off dates.

As a reminder, Alarm Grid is urging anyone still using a 3G, 4G, or CDMA communicator to upgrade to an LTE communicator as soon as possible. We know that it is tempting to wait until the last minute, especially if money is tight. But please understand that many other users are thinking the same thing. There is most likely going to be a mad rush of users trying to upgrade right at the very end. And while we will do our very best to accommodate everyone, we are unfortunately expecting that some users may get left behind, simply because they didn't act to upgrade their communicators soon enough. Don't risk it. Upgrade now, and ensure that your home or business stays protected well into the very distant future.

If you want to learn more about communicator upgrades, including which model to get for your system, and how to access the Alarm Grid Communicator Replacement Portal, then please check out this prior blog post at your earliest convenience. You may also email our team at support@alarmgrid.com if you need further assistance. We're here to help you from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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The Z-Wave Alliance has unveiled the specifications for the Z-Wave Long Range protocol to developers. This means that certified developers will soon be able to build products that meet the stringent standards of Z-Wave LR. This is surely a great moment for the world of home automation!


If this is the first time you're hearing about Z-Wave Long Range, then don't feel too bad. We have only very recently heard about the smart home protocol ourselves. Our understanding is that Z-Wave LR is a subset of the Z-Wave 700-Series that we fully expect to take the automation market by storm over the next year or two. From what we can tell, the Z-Wave LR requirements are even more restrictive than Z-Wave 700-Series standards. In other words, while every Z-Wave LR device will also meet the technical guidelines of Z-Wave 700-Series, only a small selection of 700-Series devices will also meet the criteria for Z-Wave LR.

As its name implies, the wireless signal range of Z-Wave LR is no joke. We have heard that certified Z-Wave LR devices will be able to communicate with Z-Wave LR Hubs from up to "several miles" away with direct line-of-sight. This is to be made possible when using the maximum output power of a Z-Wave LR device, which is said to be +30dBm. Silicon Labs, a member of the Z-Wave Alliance, has already achieved a direct line-of-sight signal range of up to one (1) mile when using just over +14dBm of output power. And this should only be further improved upon as more work and experimentation is completed.

In addition, Z-Wave LR technology will make it possible to pair more than 4,000 nodes with a single network, which is way up from the 232 node restriction of current Z-Wave technology. The average battery life is also expected to be drastically improved, as users will be able to go up to ten (10) years without swapping the batteries in their Z-Wave LR devices. And like all Z-Wave technology, Z-Wave LR will be backwards compatible with earlier iterations of Z-Wave. You will be able to bring over your existing Z-Wave and Z-Wave Plus devices and use them successfully with a new Z-Wave hub. Conversely, Z-Wave LR devices will be able to pair with older Z-Wave and Z-Wave Plus hubs if needed. Just keep in mind that you will need to use a Z-Wave LR Hub and certified Z-Wave LR devices to really take advantage of what the protocol has to offer.

One of the other biggest ways that Z-Wave LR differs from traditional Z-Wave is in the very topography, or general arrangement and structure, of the networks. You have likely heard us referring to Z-Wave as a "mesh network" at some point. In simple terms, this means that almost every device included in the network is able to repeat signals, and adding more devices helps the interconnected network become stronger. But for Z-Wave LR, a different arrangement commonly referred to as a Star Network, or Star Topography, is used instead. In this Star Network, the Z-Wave LR Hub or Controller is recognized as a centralized point that is able to make a direct connection with each individual Z-Wave LR device included with the network. This differs from the mesh network traditionally associated with Z-Wave, as signals are no longer hopping from node to node to reach the Hub or Controller, but rather they are traveling directly between the device and the centralized controller. What really makes a Z-Wave LR Hub so unique is that it is able to utilize a Star Network for any paired Z-Wave LR devices, while simultaneously facilitating a traditional mesh network for any older Z-Wave or Z-Wave Plus devices that you have paired.

Reports indicate that the Z-Wave Alliance will make Z-Wave LR certification available starting in March 2021. The expectation is that we will hopefully start seeing some Z-Wave LR devices enter the market by mid-to-late this year. We also expect to start seeing Z-Wave 700-Series devices become much more commonplace, as the only 700-Series device that we began offering last year was the 2GIG STZ-1 Smart Thermostat. Of course, it won't mean much if alarm system manufacturers don't embrace the technology and begin putting Z-Wave LR and 700-Series controllers into their alarm panels. Consider this to be on our wish list for new panels like the Resideo PROA7PLUS, as well as upcoming panels like the Qolsys IQ Hub and the 2GIG Edge.

Stay tuned to our blog for more information about Z-Wave 700-Series and Z-Wave LR We will keep you informed about the latest and most advanced smart home technology that should begin hitting the market soon. If you have any questions, please email our support team at support@alarmgrid.com. This is also a great email to use if you are interested in starting new alarm monitoring service to unlock the full potential of your security and automation equipment. Remember that our team is available to help you from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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If you're like the folks at Alarm Grid, then you're always looking for new and exciting ways that you can use your security system. One novel possibility is to have your system alert you if your pool or hot tub experiences an unusual temperature change. Today, we will explore how to do that.


As you likely know, using temperature sensors with an alarm system to monitor the ambient air temperature inside a building is nothing new. These devices are used to alert the user to a broken HVAC system that could result in them arriving to a very uncomfortable home, or even worse, major damage caused by the water pipes freezing. But if you want to monitor the water temperature of a pool or hot tub, then you have to get a little creative.

It goes without saying that there are several intrinsic challenges associated with setting up your alarm system to monitor the temperature of your pool or hot tub AND being alerted in the event that an unusual temperature change occurs. Basically, you need a waterproof temperature probe, a programmable temperature sensor that is compatible with that probe, AND a way to interface that temperature sensor with your alarm system. Only then will your security system keep you in the loop if your pool or spa heater goes kaput.

While there are certainly many combinations of waterproof temperature probes and programmable temperature sensors that you can use for this job, we will stick to the products that we have available on our site. This starts with the Winland TEMP-L-W Waterproof Temperature Sensor Probe, which can be safely submerged in your pool or hot tub and monitor temperatures ranging from -58°F to 158°F. It's the perfect probe for the job!

You can easily connect the Winland TEMP-L-W Probe with our selected programmable temperature sensor for the job, the Winland EA200 EnviroAlert. The reason why you need a programmable temperature sensor is because you will need to set a very specific range of temperatures to perform this task effectively. It isn't good enough to just have a very vague range of allowable temperatures here. A standard in-building temperature sensor that monitors for a broken HVAC system might be able to get away with that, but it won't do you much good if you hop in your pool and find that it's a chilly 50°F. Realistically, you will probably want to keep your pool within a very specific range, say 70°F to 80°F. And if you own a hot tub, then that range is probably even more restrictive, perhaps 98°F to 102°F. With that in mind, there isn't much room for error here. You need a digital programmable temperature sensor where you can set customizable high-low temperature limits. And as you can probably guess, the temperature sensor will alert your system if the detected water temperature goes outside these defined limits.

Please note that the EA200 only has one output function, so you can only monitor for low temp OR high temp. But only one probe is needed. If you really need to monitor for both low temp AND high temp, then you can get the Winland EA400 EnviroAlert instead, which has two (2) outputs. You can use one for low-temp monitoring alerts, and the other for high-temp monitoring alerts. But keep in mind that if you have both alert types set up, then you will need TWO (2) probes as part of the setup.

One thing to keep in mind though is that these temperature sensors are often not waterproof, so you may want to find some waterproof housing that you can keep the module inside. Remember, just because the probe is waterproof does not mean that its accompanying sensor can withstand the same conditions! The protection doesn't necessarily have to be anything super high-tech either. You may be able to get away with a plastic container with the probe running through a leak-proof fitting. Unfortunately, we don't offer any sort of waterproof contraption on our website, but your local department store can probably help!

Your last challenge is finding a way to interface the temperature sensor, in our case the Winland EA200 EnviroAlert, with your alarm panel. If you're working with a wired sensor like we are, then the standard practice is to connect it to a wired panel or a converter module. But using a complete wired to wireless converter for just one sensor is probably a bit excessive. Instead, you may look into a wireless transmitter. Many wireless door and window contact sensors have on-board terminals that you can use to connect a wired sensor. This will allow the wired sensor to communicate with the panel wirelessly. You will likely need to provide a power supply and backup battery to the equation when doing this with a powered device like a digital programmable temperature sensor, but that's to be expected when powering the device in the first place. You must also make sure the wireless sensor acting as the transmitter is compatible with your system. Some popular options for doing this include the Honeywell 5816 and the DSC PG9945. Remember to check compatibility if you are unsure as to what will work with your alarm system!

From there, it's as simple as enrolling the programmable temperature sensor with your system. You will actually be programming the wireless transmitter using its auxiliary input settings. Check the device manual to see if there's a specific Loop Number or other setting that you need to use. You will also need to configure the high-low temperature limits and the notification settings on the temperature sensor. You are making it so that whenever the detected temperature in your pool or spa goes outside the defined limits, the wired temperature sensor will tell the connected wireless transmitter to alert your system. Once this happens, a fault will occur on the associated zone, and the programmed Response Type will occur. A popular Response Type for this application is 24-Hour Auxiliary, though you will want to make sure the central station knows that this is for a pool or hot tub temperature zone, and not for a medical emergency zone.

If you have any questions about setting up a pool or hot tub temperature zone for your own security system, please reach out to us. We will be happy to help any Alarm Grid monitored customers with finding the right sensors and programming. The best way to reach us is to email support@alarmgrid.com. We're here to provide you with top-notch support and help from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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Alarm.com has a new security camera available, the ADC-V515. This is an entry-level camera for use in homes and small businesses. It supports virtually all of the same great features as the higher-end cameras from Alarm.com. The camera is available for purchase on the Alarm Grid website.


The Alarm.com ADC-V515 is set to replace the existing Alarm.com ADC-V522IR, which will remain available until the existing stock is exhausted. What's great about the new ADC-V515 is that it offers nearly all of the same excellent features and strong performance of earlier Alarm.com Camera models, but at a lower price point. We recommend this camera for anyone looking to set up video monitoring inside their home or business on a budget.

For an entry-level camera, the ADC-V515 certain boasts some impressive specifications. It offers full 1080p recording and High Dynamic Range (HDR) functionality for more luminous video captures. Its viewing angle of 110° is only 7° less than the higher-end ADC-V523. You can also effectively use the ADC-V515 at nighttime or in a dark environment thanks to its IR Night Vision feature, which works from up to 15 feet away. You will also love the ability to adjust images through Flip, Brightness, Contrast, Saturation, Sharpness, and Exposure.

One restriction with the ADC-V515 is that it can only be used with WIFI connectivity. The camera does not support wired ethernet connectivity, and it cannot be set up with Power over Ethernet (PoE). This is important to keep in mind if you are accustomed to wiring your security cameras for PoE. Instead, the ADC-V515 gets its power from a plug-in transformer, which comes included. Additionally, you can only use 2.4 GHz WIFI networks with the camera. It does not support 5 GHz WIFI networks.

Remember that the ADC-V515 is for indoor use only. If you need an outdoor camera, then you might consider the Alarm.com ADC-V723 instead. Also keep in mind that you will need Alarm.com Video Monitoring service to use the ADC-V515 or any other mainline Alarm.com Camera. You can get Alarm.com Video Monitoring service with a Platinum Plan from Alarm Grid. Both our Platinum and Self-Platinum Plans are viable options. Click here to learn more about our monitoring plans.

If you are interested in starting new monitoring service, upgrading your existing service, or if you just want to learn more about the ADC-V515, then please email our support and planner teams at support@alarmgrid.com. We're here to help you from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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