Resideo Posts

Posted By

You may recall last week we covered the supported web browsers for Alarm.com. Now we're doing the same thing, but with Total Connect 2.0. Resideo says you should use the latest version of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, Edge, or Opera, or Microsoft Internet Explorer IE11 or lower to access TC2.

If you have a monitored Honeywell or Resideo Security System, then you should make sure that access to Total Connect 2.0 is included with your monitoring plan so that you can take advantage of all its excellent features. By accessing TC2 through a compatible web browser or through the Total Connect 2.0 Mobile App, you can arm & disarm your security system, check its current status, control your associated smart home automation devices, view the live feed for your Total Connect 2.0 IP Cameras, and so much more.

Resideo puts out a list of recommended and supported web browsers to help ensure that all of their users have the best experience possible. Their interactive platform has been tested using these web browsers, and Resideo feels confident in recommending them to access their services. Any web browser not included in their list is not guaranteed to provide the same consistent function and performance as a recommended browser.

Much like what we said for the Alarm.com supported web browsers, you really shouldn't run into any issues, provided that you are using the latest version of a reputable web browser. In fact, Resideo lists all of the same supported web browsers as Alarm.com, these being Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, Apple Safari, or Microsoft Edge, plus the extra addition of the Opera Web Browser, which was absent from Alarm.com's list. So if you're one of the many fine people who uses the Opera Web Browser, and you want to use it with Total Connect 2.0, then you're in luck!

Resideo makes a special note regarding the older Internet Explorer (IE) web browser. According to Resideo, any IE Browser through version 11 (IE11 or lower) should also support Total Connect 2.0 just fine. So don't worry if you happen to be on your grandpa's computer, and he happens to have Internet Explorer as the only browser. As long as it's up to IE11 you will be okay. As for the other web browsers, you should just make sure they're on their latest versions as a precautionary measure. But honestly, it's unlikely that anything bad will happen, as long as you have been keeping up with updates at least somewhat regularly.

If you want a list of officially recommended browsers for TC2, then we have it here:

  • Google Chrome (Latest Version)
  • Mozilla Firefox (Latest Version)
  • Apple Safari (Latest Version)
  • Microsoft Edge (Latest Version)
  • Opera (Latest Version)
  • Internet Explorer (IE11 or older)

Are you thrilled that you can access TC2 through your Opera web browser? You're gonna go try it right now, aren't you? And while you're at it, why not leave a comment down below with your favorite web browser? Or you could share your thoughts on Total Connect 2.0 and how you use it to make your life more convenient. We would love to hear from you, so please don't be shy! And as always, stay tuned for more security system news coming soon!

Tags: ,

Comments


Posted By

Alarm Grid has learned that Resideo has discontinued their popular outdoor camera, the Honeywell IPCAM-WOC1. The camera can no longer be purchased from Alarm Grid. This leaves Total Connect 2.0 users with no true option for an outdoor camera. There is no timeline for a replacement model.

The Honeywell IPCAM-WOC1, also known as the Lyric OC1, was best-known for its 1080p recording capability and its ability to withstand the harshness of an outdoor environment. Existing models should still work very well, and you should not encounter any issues when attempting to pair a used model, provided that the camera is not already associated with an existing Total Connect 2.0 account. But unfortunately, the IPCAM-WOC1 is no longer available for purchase, and you are unlikely to find a new model anywhere else. If you do decide to purchase a used model, then just make sure that the camera is no longer associated with an active TC2 account.

It's a bit surprising to see Resideo drop this camera, as it had been their only available outdoor security camera. The closest available device is the Honeywell SkyBell Doorbell Camera, which is great for monitoring the area around a door. But other than that, the only other current Total Connect 2.0 Cameras are the Honeywell IPCAM-WIC1 and the Honeywell IPCAM-WIC2, both of which are for indoor use only.

We have heard a rumor that Resideo is planning to release a new outdoor camera before the end of the year, but we have not heard anything definitive, and no timeline is in place. We hope that is the case, as the sooner a new outdoor camera is available, the better. One option if you are still exploring your choices for an alarm system is to get one that supports Alarm.com, as that platform supports some great outdoor cameras, including the ADC-V723 and the ADC-VC736. Remember that you will need a monitoring plan that supports video surveillance to use those cameras. An Alarm Grid Platinum Plan or an Alarm Grid Video-Only Plan are both viable options.

Have you tried using the IPCAM-WOC1? Are you surprised that Resideo discontinued the camera? What would you like to see in a new outdoor camera from Resideo? Share your thoughts down below in the comments. Maybe we'll write a "wish-list" blog of what we hope Resideo puts into a new outdoor security camera. Stay tuned for more alarm system and security camera news and information from Alarm Grid coming soon!

Tags: , , , ,

Comments


Posted By

Here at Alarm Grid, we try to help as many people as possible with their alarm system. Sure, we hope it will lead folks to choose us for their alarm monitoring needs. But it's also because we're simply helpful people. An alarm in your home or business should help quell fears, not cause them.

We've begun what I think of as "Silly Season". You may be familiar with this term from Nascar, but for us in the alarm industry, this is the time when a lot of home buying and selling occurs. During this time, we get a lot of calls that go something like this, "I just moved into a home with an existing alarm. We haven't been using it, but somehow it got armed, and now it's going off, and I don't know the code to disarm it. Please help!"

Moving into a new home is exciting, but it's also stressful and can be overwhelming at times. So, I've (Ms. Manners) put together this guide to help you, the person who moved out of the home in this scenario, to leave behind your alarm system in a way that's as stress-free as possible for all parties involved.

Ms. Manners Says: Notify Your Alarm Company

If your alarm system is monitored, be sure to notify your alarm company that you are moving out and that the system is staying behind. This may seem obvious, but many people assume that if they stop paying their monitoring fees, the alarm company will know they no longer want service and will cancel it on their own. This is not the case for a number of reasons! There may be contracts involved. There could be liability issues. So for many reasons - not the least of which is it's the polite thing to do - any time you wish to stop monitoring service to a particular address, you should notify the alarm monitoring company as soon as possible.

By notifying the alarm company, you do several things. You give them an opportunity to reach out to the new homeowner and introduce themselves. Hopefully, if you've had a good experience with your monitoring company, you will also put in a good word about them to the new homeowner. Both of these things give the company a leg-up when it comes to courting a potential new customer, and it also gives the new homeowner information based on your real-life experience, not just an advertisement in a new homeowner's mailer.

By notifying the monitoring company, you can also help to prevent any unnecessary dispatching of the authorities to this address. As bad as the scenario above is for the poor, uninformed new homeowner, it's worse for the police, fire, or EMS personnel who may respond to the alarm, which we know is false.

Remember, the person who signed up for the monitoring service at the address in the scenario above no longer lives there. That means the monitoring station is going to be calling people who have no idea what may be going on at this address (which is also an annoyance for the person receiving the call). In this situation, it is likely that the monitoring station MUST dispatch because if they don't (and there is some type of emergency) there may be repercussions for them. A monitoring station is always going to adhere to the adage, "Better safe than sorry." After all, safety is their business.

Ms. Manners Says: Default Users, But Not Zones

When you sell a house and the alarm system with it, you may think it's a good idea to set the alarm system back to factory default to allow the new homeowner a chance to program it as they see fit. Resist this urge! In most cases, what was your Front Door is now going to be their Front Door. What was your Kitchen Window is now going to be their Kitchen Window. John's Bedroom Window may become Jane's Bedroom Window, but this is a pretty simple thing to change and doesn't really call for the entire system to be set back to factory default.

When it comes to user codes, though, it is best to set these back to factory defaults. This will prevent the new homeowner from finding out what codes you used. After all, we are creatures of habit, and there's a good chance you'll use those same codes in your next system. Also, if you set the codes for the Installer and Master users back to their default, the new homeowner should easily be able to find out what they are by doing a quick search online. Then, if they find themselves in the messy scenario discussed above, they'll be able to get themselves out of it. Being able to get yourself out of a jam like this one can do wonders for your self-confidence.

System Manufacturers and their Default Codes

Panel Manufacturer Installer Code Master Code
Honeywell Vista (Non-polling) 4112 1234
Honeywell All-in-One 4112 1234
2GIG GC2 1561 1111
2GIG GC3 1561 1111
Qolsys 1111 1234
Interlogix Simon XT 4321 1234
Interlogix Simon XTi & XTi-5 4321 1234
DSC Impassa 5555 1234

Use the information in the table above to set the codes in your panel back to their default values. If you don't see your panel listed, you can likely find the information you need with a quick online search. Performing this process is the single most helpful thing you can do for the new homeowner when it comes to the alarm system!

Ms. Manners Says: Leave Behind Good Notes

Any information you know about your alarm system, such as the manufacturer and model, the default installer code, and the default master code - each of which hopefully you have programmed into your panel by this time - will be helpful for the new homeowner. A list of zone numbers and their descriptions is also very much appreciated by a new homeowner. Leave them a note, tucked behind the keypad, or on a kitchen counter. Give them the sequence of keys to enter to disarm the system, or better yet, if you have the opportunity, show it to them, and then leave them a note to back up your demonstration.

If you're willing, leave them your contact information so they can contact you in the event that something unforeseen comes up. This is particularly important if your system is somewhat complex and has multiple home automation features integrated with it. I promise the last thing the new homeowner wants to do is bother you if they can avoid it. Everyone at Alarm Grid has talked with a frantic new homeowner who never even considered contacting the prior homeowner. It's usually something we suggest if we're unable to assist.

Fortunately, in most cases, we are able to assist, and we are happy to do so. This is just one of the many ways we make new friends here at Alarm Grid! I hope that anyone who is preparing to move out of a home and leave behind an alarm system will read this and use these suggestions to prepare.

If you happen to be moving into a home that already has an alarm system, and perhaps the previous homeowner didn't read this post, feel free to reach out to us. We're here Monday - Friday from 9:00 am to 8:00 pm Eastern Time. You can reach us via email, or by calling 888-818-7728.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Comments


Posted By

We are happy to announce that the Honeywell Home PROA7 and the Resideo PROA7C are now available. You can consider these as entry level versions of the Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS and the Resideo PROA7PLUSC.

The best way to think of the PROA7 and PROA7C is that they are the PROA7PLUS without a Honeywell Home PROWIFIZW, no Bluetooth capabilities, and no front panel camera. It's the same as the PROA7PLUS, just with no WIFI, no Z-Wave, no optional automatic Bluetooth disarming, and no disarm photos. You can always add the PROWIFIZW Module later on to add WIFI and Z-Wave Plus, but Bluetooth and the front camera can never be added. Basically, you will always be working with a lesser version of the PROA7PLUS.

If you want to get a PROA7 or PROA7C monitored, then you will need to add a PROWIFIZW Module and/or one of the compatible LTE cellular communicators, which are the Honeywell Home PROLTE-A AT&T LTE Communicator and the Honeywell Home PROLTE-V Verizon LTE Communicator. Getting the system monitored will also allow you to use Total Connect 2.0 to control the system remotely, provided that access to the service is included with your monitoring plan.

Remember that since the ProSeries System does not yet support local end-user programming, you will not be able to enroll any sensors with the PROA7 or PROA7C until you get it monitored. The Honeywell Home PROSIX and Honeywell SiX Series Sensors return as compatible encrypted peripherals for the systems, and you can also add a Honeywell Home PROTAKEOVER Module for legacy RF sensor support.

Any one of several older manufacturer's sensors can be used with the PROTAKEOVER Module. These include Honeywell 5800 series, 2GIG 345 MHz (non-encrypted), Qolsys/Interlogix 319.5 MHz, DSC, and Bosch which both use a variation of 433 MHz. Up to 250 zones in total can be used with the PROA7 or PROA7C.

As you may have guessed, the only difference between the Honeywell Home PROA7 and the Resideo PROA7C is that the PROA7 says "Honeywell Home" across its front, while the PROA7C says "Resideo" across its front. Other than that, they really are the same panel. Which one do you like more? Let us know in the comments down below. And remember to reach out to us with any questions you might have. As always, we look forward to hearing from you!

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Comments


Posted By

One product that we have yet to discuss in great detail is the Honeywell Home PROINDMV Indoor Motion Viewer. This is a very promising accessory for PROA7PLUS users, especially those who are looking for a more affordable alternative to Honeywell IP Cameras and true video surveillance service.


If you are familiar with image sensors, then the Honeywell PROINDMV Indoor Motion Viewer is exactly that, plus a bit more. It is part of the Honeywell Home PROSIX Lineup of wireless sensors, so perhaps PROSIXINDMV would have been a more appropriate name. But nomenclature aside, this is a very handy and useful sensor for anyone with a PROA7PLUS Alarm System, especially if your monitoring plan doesn’t include video surveillance, and you are looking to keep your monitoring costs down.

You can think of the PROINDMV as a PIR motion detection sensor, combined with a video camera. It should basically be treated as an interior motion. If its PIR sensor is triggered while the PROA7PLUS System is Armed Away or Armed Night with the PROINDMV listed as active, the system will go into alarm, and the PROINDMV Camera automatically produces either a 10-second video clip or a still-motion image. The clip or image is made available at the PROA7PLUS Panel under the Camera Log, and it can also be seen on Total Connect 2.0. We expect that an update allowing the image or video clip to be automatically forwarded to the central station will be made available sometime in the not-too-distant future. The PROINDMV will also produce an image or video clip if its PIR is tripped during the Entry Delay Period, but in that case, the image or video clip will be held, and only sent out if the system isn’t disarmed in time and ultimately enters alarm.

The PROINDMV will only capture an image or video clip if it is triggered while the system is Armed Away or Armed Night, or in an Entry Delay Period. At this time, there is no way to request a manual “peek-in” like you can for Honeywell IP Cameras. However, we are hopeful that this feature will be made available in a later update. Anyone with access to Total Connect 2.0 can use at least one (1) PROINDMV. And if your TC2 account includes automation (Alarm Grid Silver Plan or higher), then you will be able to add up to eight (8) PROINVMD devices. Only the ten (10) newest clips or images are available, and they are automatically deleted after thirty (30) days. Images and clips can be sent via IP (WIFI) or cellular.

Overall, we think the Honeywell Home PROINDMV is a great product if you aren’t quite ready to make the leap to full video surveillance with Honeywell IP Cameras and an Alarm Grid Platinum Plan. The video camera records in 10 frames per second (FPS), so it isn’t anything too fancy. But it’s certainly good enough for verifying alarms and identifying suspects in a true break-in event. The PIR sensor covers more than 39 feet by 54 feet, with a 90° detection angle, making it suitable for large rooms in your home or business It even offers Pet Immunity for small animals weighing up to 80 lbs, provided that you follow the mounting guidelines. It will be nice for Resideo to finish making all the features available, as the lack of a “peek-in” is sorely missed. We also eagerly await the ability for clips and images to be automatically forwarded to the central station, as that is very important for alarm verification in certain jurisdictions.

You can purchase the Honeywell Home PROINDMV right now from the Alarm Grid website. Remember, this device only works with the PROA7PLUS ProSeries 7” All-In-One Panel from Resideo and Honeywell Home. We will be sure to keep you updated on this blog as new features for the PROINDMV are made available. We’re sure that Resideo has some great ideas in mind for this device, and looks to be promising sensor. If you have any questions about the PROINDMV Motion Viewer, or if you are interested in alarm monitoring services for access to TC2 so that you can get started with your own PROINDMV, send an email to support@alarmgrid.com. We’re here to check your email from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!
Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Comments


Posted By

Alarm Grid has learned about issues that may arise if you attempt to use an SIA PROM Chip on a Non-SIA Honeywell VISTA Panel. Doing so may prevent connected ECP devices from working properly. Issues may also arise if you attempt to use a Non-SIA PROM Chip on an SIA-approved VISTA Panel.

Before we discuss the issue itself, we will first cover some terminology to ensure that everyone is on the same page. Many Honeywell VISTA Alarm Panels come in both SIA and non-SIA variants. For example, there is the Honeywell VISTA-20PSIA and the Honeywell VISTA-20P, the Honeywell VISTA-15PSIA and the Honeywell VISTA-15P, etc. When you see SIA in the panel's name, that indicates that the alarm panel has been configured to meet various guidelines outlined by the Security Industry Association (SIA) for false alarm prevention. For all intents and purposes, SIA-Compliant VISTA Panels are basically the exact same as non-SIA VISTA Panels, except that the SIA-approved panels have various programming restrictions put into place to prevent false alarms. For example, an SIA-compliant VISTA Panel will not allow you to disable Entry and Exit Delay periods, and they will require you to set a minimum Dialer Delay for the system. There are various other restrictions that we won't cover in this post. Just know that an SIA-compliant system will have various restrictions in programming for the purpose of preventing false alarms.

Meanwhile, the PROM Chip installed on a Honeywell VISTA System sets its firmware. You can easily locate the PROM Chip on your VISTA System's green circuit board. Just look for the small black square chip with the white sticker on it. The white sticker includes version information so the user can identify the type of VISTA System they are using and its current firmware. Users remove older PROM Chips and replace them with newer ones as a means of upgrading their VISTA Systems to support new features. Alarm Grid sells 15P PROM Chips, 20P PROM Chips, and 21iP PROM Chips for Honeywell VISTA Systems. We typically advise replacing a 15P or 20P PROM Chip with less than Firmware Version 9.12, as that is the minimum version needed to support Total Connect 2.0. Likewise, the minimum PROM Chip needed on a VISTA-21iP for Total Connect 2.0 is 3.13. For more information on replacing PROM Chips, please see this helpful FAQ.

Please note that it is only possible to replace a PROM Chip on a VISTA System with a firmware version or PROM Chip version of 2.0 or higher. If your VISTA System shows a PROM Chip version of less than 2.0, then it is not possible to replace its PROM Chip, and you must replace the panel entirely. Also note, that you should never attempt to remove or replace a PROM Chip while your VISTA Panel is powered on. Always power down the panel completely before replacing its PROM Chip.

For the longest time, it was believed that you could use an SIA PROM Chip on its non-SIA VISTA printed circuit board (PCB) without experiencing an issue. For example, if you removed the PROM Chip on a Honeywell VISTA-20P, and replaced it with a WA20PSIA PROM Chip, then it was believed that no issues would occur. The same was believed to be true if you used a non-SIA PROM Chip on an SIA-compliant VISTA board. An example there would be if you removed the PROM Chip on a Honeywell VISTA-20PSIA and replaced it with a 20P PROM Chip. Aside from determining what was allowable within programming, no other issues were believed to occur if you used an SIA PROM Chip on a non-SIA VISTA System PCB, or vice-versa.

But upon further testing, that is not the case starting with VISTA System Firmware Version 9.17 on VISTA-20P Panels. Any Honeywell VISTA-20P PCB (non-SIA) that is being upgraded to Panel Firmware Version 9.17 or higher must have a non-SIA 20P PROM Chip. Likewise, any Honeywell VISTA-20PSIA System PCB (SIA-Compliant) that is being upgraded to Panel Firmware Version 9.17 or higher must have a 20PSIA PROM Chip. If you try to use an SIA PROM Chip on a non-SIA VISTA System (or vice-versa), then it is possible that peripheral devices connected to the system's ECP bus may not work properly. ECP devices for a VISTA System include any wired keypads, any alarm monitoring communicators, and any wireless receivers. This same error is also believed to occur on any Honeywell VISTA-15P (or VISTA-15PSIA) that is being upgraded to Panel Firmware Version 9.17 or higher, though further testing is needed to verify if that is indeed the case.

You can determine whether your VISTA System is an SIA Panel PCB or a non-SIA Panel PCB by checking a sticker on the panel's terminal block. This is a small barcode sticker at the bottom of the terminal block, below the phone line terminals. Check for one of the following messages:

  • SAVS20PSIA - Regular VISTA-20P
  • SAV20P-SIAP - VISTA-20PSIA
  • SAVS15PSIA - Regular VISTA-15P
  • SAV15P-SIAP - VISTA-15PSIA

Long story short, if you are using a Honeywell VISTA-20P, VISTA-20PSIA, VISTA-15P, or VISTA-15PSIA and you wish to PROM upgrade it to System Firmware Version 9.17 or higher, then make absolutely sure to use a PROM Chip specifically designed for that particular board. Do not attempt to use an SIA-equivalent on a non-SIA board, or a non-SIA Chip on an SIA-Compliant VISTA board. Mixing an SIA Chip on a non-SIA board (or vice-versa) for 15P or 20P Systems (or SIA equivalents) when upgrading to Firmware Version 9.17 or higher can result in ECP devices not working properly. As long as you use a proper PROM Chip for your system, then no issues should arise. If you are ordering a PROM upgrade chip from Alarm Grid then place your order and be sure to specify which version you need by sending us an email using the email address listed below. If you purchase either the Honeywell LTEIA-TC2 or LTEIV-TC2 or any of our other upgrade kits for VISTA panels, then you will receive all four of the available upgrade chips. Just be sure to select the correct chip for your VISTA PCB.

If you have any further questions about Honeywell VISTA Systems and their PROM Chips, or if you want to learn more about alarm monitoring service for your Honeywell VISTA System, please send an email to support@alarmgrid.com. We're here to answer any questions or concerns you might have. Our hours for responding to emails run from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Comments


Posted By

Two new products have been added to the Alarm Grid website. The Resideo PROWLTOUCHC Wireless Touchscreen Keypad and the Honeywell DT8050V Hardwired DUAL TEC® Motion Sensor are now available for purchase. Today, we will take a quick look at these two exciting new products from Resideo.

The Resideo PROWLTOUCHC Keypad is the exact same device as the Honeywell Home PROWLTOUCH Keypad built for the Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS and the Resideo PROA7PLUSC. The only difference is that the Resideo PROWLTOUCHC says "Resideo" across its front. This is instead of "Honeywell Home", which is shown across the Honeywell Home PROWLTOUCH. If you couldn't guess, the C at the end of PROWLTOUCHC is used to indicate Commercial. It seems Resideo doesn't want the phrase Honeywell HOME written across the front of a keypad built for commercial use. The company has made similar variants for other products recently. Truly, these keypads are exactly the same, and you can use them in-place of each other without issue. If you are a homeowner needing a touchscreen keypad for your PROA7PLUS, and you prefer your keypad to read "Resideo" instead of "Honeywell Home", then you can certainly use the PROWLTOUCHC instead of the PROWLTOUCH. Even though the PROWLTOUCHC is technically the commercial version, it will still work fine in a home. Likewise, if you are a business owner and you like "Honeywell Home" more than "Resideo", then feel free to use the residential PROWLTOUCH model. It may seem a bit silly, but that's the only difference - whether your keypad says Honeywell Home or Resideo. If you prefer Resideo, well then the PROWLTOUCHC is now here!

The other exciting new product from Resideo is the Honeywell DT8050V DUAL TEC® Motion Sensor. This sensor is a direct replacement for the Honeywell DT8050, which has been discontinued. We're still not entirely sure what differentiates the DT8050V from the DT8050. But if you were considering the DT8050, well you should now look into the DT8050V instead. Just like its predecessor, the new DT8050V is a DUAL TEC® motion sensor that utilizes both passive infrared (PIR) and microwave detection. By putting both these detection methods to use, false alarms can be prevented. The sensor will only alert the system if both PIR detection and microwave detection are triggered. Much like most other wired motion sensors, the DT8050V uses a 4-wire connection with the panel. Two (2) wires are for the zone, and the other two (2) are for power. There is another pair of terminals that can be used for a normally closed tamper output, but the use of a tamper circuit is optional. You can use the sensor at pretty much any standard (non-Polling Loop, non-Addressable) wired zone. It's great for use on a Honeywell VISTA System, a DSC PowerSeries NEO, an Interlogix Wired System, and much more. This Dual Tec motion sensor can serve as an excellent long-term addition to your wired system!

If you have any questions about the new Resideo PROWLTOUCHC or the Honeywell DT8050V, contact us via email at support@alarmgrid.com. We're here to help you from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Comments


Posted By

Alarm Grid is now offering a new "alternate" version of the Resideo ProSeries 7" All-In-One Panel. In addition to the existing Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS, Alarm Grid customers now have the option of the new Resideo PROA7PLUSC Security System. Both options are the same, except for one aspect.


Before you get super excited and full of anticipation, we're sorry to spoil the fun. The change really isn't anything too revolutionary. While the Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS reads "Honeywell Home" across the front of the panel, the Resideo PROA7PLUSC instead reads "Resideo" across its front. Yes, other than that small aesthetic change, these are the same alarm panels, with the same features, the same compatibility, and the same performance.

Why did Resideo bother to do this? From what we can tell, it's a marketing decision. They wanted the brand recognition of the "Honeywell Home" namesake, but since businesses may not want to use a product with "Home" in the title, the "Resideo" version is available as well. Indeed, the Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS is officially the "residential" version, while the Resideo PROA7PLUSC is officially the "commercial" version. We know, it's a bit redundant, but ask yourself this - are you really surprised?

You are free to throw caution to the wind of course. If you want to use the "commercial" Resideo PROA7PLUSC with the corporate sticker of "Resideo" boldly adorning the alarm panel that you use in your residence, feel free. Or conversely, if you're a business owner wanting to bring the comfort of "home" into the office, then you're welcome to use the "residential" Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS with the "Honeywell Home" moniker. It really won't make much of a difference, but you can go with whichever option makes you happier.

You may actually recall that Resideo did something similar with the new Tuxedo Keypad for their hardwired Honeywell VISTA Security Systems. In that realm, you can choose between the Honeywell Home TUXEDOW with "Honeywell Home" emblazoned across the front panel, or you can opt for the Resideo TUXEDOWC with "Resideo" taking the spotlight. Again, that is the only difference between the two keypad models. Now Resideo is doing it again with their wireless panels. Will it be the last time they do this? Our bets are on "No", but time will tell.

Anyway, whether you choose the PROA7PLUS or PROA7PLUSC, you are getting a fantastic wireless alarm panel with some outstanding features. We have already covered the system in extensive detail before, so please check out our introduction and buying guide for the system that we put out late last year.

We must also report that local programming is still yet to be released, so you will need your alarm monitoring company to perform virtually all tasks remotely when it comes to setting up the system. Our understanding is that the systems (yes, both of them) will soon be made to support local programming, hopefully in the coming months. We also have no word on when, or even if, Apple HomeKit functionality will become a reality. For now, if you want a panel that does support end-user programming AND offers a robust integration with Apple HomeKit, you might instead consider the Honeywell Lyric Alarm System, which in many ways is still the superior option.

If you have any questions about the Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS, the Resideo PROA7PLUSC, the Honeywell Lyric, or if you just want to learn about alarm monitoring in general, contact our team via email at support@alarmgrid.com. We are here to check your email from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Comments


Posted By

We have learned that the Honeywell 5877 Garage Door Relay has been discontinued, effective immediately. This leaves the Honeywell Lyric and the Honeywell LYNX Touch Panels with no viable option for a smart garage door controller. The associated Honeywell GDCK Kit is also discontinued.

The Honeywell 5877 was widely seen as one of the most important automation accessories for the Lyric and LYNX Touch Systems. Thanks to this module, a user could integrate their garage door motor with their wireless Honeywell Alarm System and the Total Connect 2.0 platform. This allowed users to open and close their garage doors from anywhere using TC2, and they could also use the platform to check its current OPEN or CLOSED status when a separate garage door sensor was used. Users could also include their garage doors with smart scenes for automatic operation based on a schedule or with predetermined events.

With the 5877 being discontinued, there is no longer a viable method for setting up a Lyric or LYNX Touch System for local garage door control. The decision by Resideo to discontinue the Honeywell 5877 does not strike us as a big surprise. An increasing number of users have been finding good alternatives to the 5877 lately. One example is the Chamberlain and LiftMaster Integration for Total Connect 2.0. While this server-to-server integration does not allow for local control of the garage door at the security panel, being able to control the garage door remotely from TC2 is considered by most users to be more important. You can learn more about that integration here. The 5877 also has a big limitation, in that it does not work with the increasingly popular LiftMaster MyQ Garage Motors.

It is also important to note that the Lyric and LYNX Touch Systems are not compatible with most third-party Z-Wave garage door openers. This somewhat forced Lyric and LYNX Touch users to go with the first-party 5877 device from Resideo, rather than buying a third-party device that they do not manufacture. But the game has been changed with the newest Resideo System, the Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS. This new system offers a much wider selection of possible integrations. For example, Alarm Grid offers the popular GoControl GD00Z-8-GC Z-Wave Plus Garage Door Opener, which is often used with various Alarm.com Security Panels. That unit works with the PROA7PLUS, but not the Lyric and LYNX Touch Systems. The bottom line is that fewer people were buying the Honeywell 5877, and Resideo decided it was no longer in their best interest to continue manufacturing it.

Of course, the unfortunate result of this is that the Lyric and LYNX Touch Panels do not have a good option for smart garage door control. If you have an existing Honeywell 5877 Module, then it will continue to work fine. Or if you find a used one somewhere, then that should also be okay for setting up new service. The other components of the Honeywell GDCK Kit are still available, including the Honeywell 5822T for monitoring a garage door's current status. But if you were in the market for a new 5877 for an existing Lyric or LYNX Touch, then we are sorry to say that you are out of luck. You should try finding a used model if possible, or you may consider upgrading to a newer alarm system.

This truly represents the end of an era, as the Honeywell 5877 was a mainstay accessory for the longest time. But all good things must come to an end. If you have any questions about the discontinued 5877, or if you need help integrating your alarm system with your garage door, then please email us at support@alarmgrid.com. Being able to control your garage door remotely is a great perk of alarm monitoring service, and we are here to help you explore your remaining options. Our team is here to answer your questions from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Comments


Posted By

One of the more interesting things about the Honeywell Home PROSIX Sensor lineup is that it features two (2) different "mini" door and window sensors. These are the Honeywell Home PROSIXMINI and the Honeywell Home PROSIXMINI2. Today, we will be comparing and contrasting these sensors.


When the Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS Alarm Panel first hit the market, a new lineup of sensors also made their debut. These are the Honeywell Home PROSIX Sensors, and they make the perfect complement to Resideo's latest security system. These devices are best-known for their 128-bit AES encryption and their improved wireless range over the Honeywell and Resideo Sensors that came before them. The PROSIX Sensors can only be used with the PROA7PLUS, and until Resideo makes local programming available for the system, you will need the help of your monitoring company to enroll any new sensor.

At first glance, the PROSIX Sensor Family seems pretty straightforward. It is a very robust lineup, featuring everything from security sensors like motion detectors and glassbreak listeners, to environmental sensors like flood sensors and temperature sensors. But there is one anomaly that often makes people turn heads. That is the presence of two (2) different "mini" door and window contact sensors, the PROSIXMINI and the PROSIXMINI2. Both are surface-mounted contact sensors, and both monitor an interior door or window for opening and closing. A third sensor in the lineup, the PROSIXCT also accomplishes the same task, but that sensor is considerably larger and features an auxiliary input to provide wireless transmitter functionality. But it begs the question - why is there both a PROSIXMINI and a PROSIXMINI2?

Starting with the PROSIXMINI, this sensor actually looks virtually identical to the Honeywell SiXMINICT from the Honeywell SiX Series Lineup made popular by the Lyric Controller. It's likely that Resideo took the same plastic casing from the SiXMINICT and repurposed it for the PROSIXMINI. And when compared the alternative option from the same sensor generation, the PROSIXMINI2, the only category where the PROSIXMINI "wins" is in size. The PROSIXMINI (2.44"L x 1.25"W x 0.45"D) is the smaller and more discrete sensor when compared with the larger and slightly bulkier PROSIXMINI2 (2.9"L x 1.15"W x 0.75"D). The reason why the PROSIXMINI is able to maintain a smaller profile and relatively "flat" design is thanks to its use of a CR2450 coin battery. Meanwhile, the PROSIXMINI2 uses a CR2 battery, which has a more traditional, cylindrical shape,

But before you go declaring the PROSIXMINI to be the winner, you might to consider the fact that the PROSIXMINI2 outshines its smaller and flatter competitor in virtually every other possible aspect. The PROSIXMINI2 has a wireless range of 300+ feet in open air, while the PROSIXIMINI is limited to 200+ feet. The PROSIXMINI2 also wins in the battle of battery life, as its lithium CR2 battery should last about seven (7) years before a replacement is needed. The lithium CR2450 battery inside the PROSIXMINI can only be counted on for about five (5) years. Also, some equipment testing has shown that the use of coin cell batteries inside a sensor can be problematic. It's likely that Resideo wanted to give users an alternative option that uses a more trustworthy battery.


Now, you're likely wondering, which sensor should you get? The PROSIXMINI or the PROSIXMINI2? If aesthetics are the single most important concern to you, and you simply want the smallest and most discreet sensor, the you can make a case for the PROSIXMINI. But if you ask us, we think the PROSIXMINI2 is the superior option, because of its improved signal range, extended battery life, and more reliable battery performance in general. But rest assured, both the PROSIXMINI and the PROSIXMINI2 should work very well on any PROA7PLUS Security System.

If you need help deciding on sensors for your system, or if you are an Alarm Grid monitored customer needing us to help you enroll new sensors with your PROA7PLUS, please email us at support@alarmgrid.com. This is also a good email to use if you are interested in starting new monitoring service with Alarm Grid. We're here to check your emails from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Comments