Resideo Posts

Posted By

Alarm Grid is proud to announce that the Honeywell LTEM-XA and Honeywell LTEM-XV are now available! These are both brand-new cellular communicators for VISTA Systems. They follow the same installation process as the LTE-XA and LTE-XV, which are being phased out in favor of these new models.


What separates the LTEM-XA and the LTEM-XV from their predecessors is that they connect with the advanced LTE Cat M1 networks. These networks allow for stronger security and more effective signal penetration than other LTE cellular networks. The LTEM-XA receives service from the AT&T, while the LTEM-XV is covered by Verizon. As usual, the decision to go with one over the other has nothing to do with your personal phone, and it will have no impact on the cost of your monitoring service.

It should be noted that the older LTE-XA and LTE-XV will still continue to work as intended. Anyone using one of these modules does not need to upgrade to a newer model or replace their existing equipment. In fact, there is very little reason to do so if your system is working as intended. You can confirm that your communicator is receiving a strong cellular signal by checking the Signal LED on the front of the module. A solid green light indicates a strong signal. It's also worth mentioning that the LTE-XA and LTE-XV will continue to remain available for purchase while stock remains of these products. However, there is little reason to buy them, as the LTEM-XA and LTEM-XV are now the recommended models.

One other important note about the LTEM-XA and LTEM-XV is that they offer cellular connectivity only. These are not dual-path communicators, and they do not provide internet connectivity. This is not a huge concern, as LTE Cat M1 service is plenty fast and extremely reliable on its own. But if you do want a dual-path option for your Honeywell VISTA System, then the Honeywell LTE-IA (AT&T LTE & IP) and the Honeywell LTE-IV (Verizon LTE & IP) are still readily available. Just remember that the LTE-IA and the LTE-IV only use "standard" LTE connectivity, as opposed to the LTE Cat M1 service offered by the LTE-XA and LTE-XV. It is currently unknown if Resideo will eventually release dual-path communicators that utilize LTE Cat M1 connectivity. Like always, we promise to keep you informed about any updates.

The function of the LTEM-XA and LTE-XV remains largely the same from other AlarmNet Communicators. By installing and activating one of these modules, your Honeywell VISTA Security System will be able to communicate with the Resideo AlarmNet Servers across a fast and reliable LTE Cat M1 cellular network. If your alarm panel supports Total Connect 2.0, then you will be able to take advantage of that great service as well, provided that access to the TC2 platform is included in your monitoring plan. Remember that a VISTA-15P or VISTA-20P System must have PROM Chip Version of 9.12 or higher to support Total Connect 2.0. We sell PROM Chip Upgrades for the 15P and for the 20P if you need them. Please also refer to this FAQ on identifying and replacing PROM Chips.

While the 15P and 20P are most likely going to be the most commonly used systems with the LTEM-XA and LTEM-XV, you can technically use these communicators with any Honeywell VISTA System that supports ECP mode. Please feel free to contact us with any questions you have regarding system compatibility. You are also welcome to contact us if you are interested in starting new monitoring service. Our team is happy to help you get started. The best way to reach us is to email support@alarmgrid.com. We're here to check your emails from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Comments


Posted By

Alarm Grid is aware of Technical Notification #55 that identifies possible premature low battery warnings for Honeywell Combination Smoke and CO Detectors. Affected products include the Honeywell 5800COMBO, the Honeywell SiXCOMBO, and the new Honeywell Home PROSIXCOMBO for the PROA7PLUS.


According to Technical Notification #55 from Resideo, most instances of a premature low battery condition occur after replacing the batteries in a Honeywell 5800COMBO, Honeywell SiXCOMBO, or Honeywell Home PROSIXCOMBO. This notice pertains only to a low battery condition that occurs immediately, or almost immediately, after replacing the batteries in a sensor that has been in use for several years.

Each of the aforementioned combination smoke/CO detectors uses four (4) lithium 3V CR123A batteries for power. A premature low battery condition is when the sensor falsely indicates that the batteries inside the sensor are low on power, and a corresponding trouble condition is displayed for the associated zone(s) on the panel. But while the sensor is falsely indicating low batteries, the actual reality is that the batteries are still at, or near, full power.

Resideo states that the false low battery condition is the result of intermittent connectivity between the batteries themselves and the nickel battery contact points inside the sensor's battery compartment. The best way to verify that the low-battery condition is indeed false is to take a voltmeter reading of the batteries. If you find that the reading for each battery is at or above 3V, then you can confirm that the low battery condition is false. Any one of the four (4) batteries that reads below 3V could cause a low battery indication.

Additionally, Resideo suggests taking the following steps to see if a low battery trouble condition can be cleared:

  • Make sure each battery is properly seated and secured in its holder.
  • Make sure the battery contacts are snug with no movement.
  • Make sure the battery as well as the battery contacts are clean, and wipe them with alcohol or a mildly abrasive cloth if necessary.
  • Remove and reinstall the batteries to try and clear the trouble condition.
  • Replace old batteries with fresh ones to see if the trouble clears.

As a reference, the aforementioned sensors will typically report a low battery condition once the detected voltage drops below 2.3V. If you have a premature low battery condition on one of these sensors that you cannot otherwise clear, then make sure to check the batteries regularly and replace them as soon as necessary. If possible, try performing the steps above to see if you can correct a premature low battery condition. It may be necessary in a worse case scenario to replace any sensor affected by this condition. Attempting to use a sensor displaying a consistent low battery trouble is certainly not ideal, even if that condition is known to be false. Remember that these are life-safety sensors, so keeping them consistently powered on and functioning properly is crucial.

If you have any questions about this issue, then please not hesitate to email our support team at support@alarmgrid.com. We check our email from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Comments


Posted By

In order to reboot a router remotely using a VISTA P-Series Panel, you will manually activate an output, which will fault a zone. The zone fault will be programmed to activate a Z-Wave switch, which is powering the internet router or modem. A cellular connection is required to do this.

And there you have it, that's how you do it! Just kidding! We're going to cover exactly what you need to do. Alarm Grid had this scenario come up recently and thought it would make a good case study to cover.

First, we wrote an FAQ that covers how to manually control a programmable output through the keypad. But then we thought that putting the FAQ together with information outlining the exact problem that we resolved by using the manual output command might add some much-needed context and show how this command can really come in handy. This also outlines one of the reasons why a cellular communicator is so important to have as a backup to an internet connection!

Let me set the scene: The hero in our case study spends several months each year away from his primary residence. The system installed in this residence is a Honeywell VISTA-20P with a Honeywell Home Tuxedo installed, as well as an LTE dual-path communicator. The Honeywell LTE-IA or the Honeywell LTE-IV are equally suitable for use in this scenario. In addition, any of the compatible automation controllers, such as the Honeywell VAM or the older Tuxedo Touch WIFI, could be used instead of the newer Honeywell Home Tuxedo.

The Problem

While our hero is enjoying his time away, he discovers that his internet connection at home is down. Of course, if he were at home, the first thing he would do, after verifying that his ISP isn't experiencing an outage, is reboot his router to see if the connection comes back up. But he's not at home, and furthermore, there is no one he can send to his home to perform this task for him. Now, since he has a dual-path communicator with the cellular connection enabled and active, he doesn't have to worry that his panel won't be able to communicate a signal if the alarm goes off. He's safe in that regard. However, in addition to the alarm panel's ability to send signals through the internet when it is available, the Tuxedo also uses the internet to provide a communication path to Total Connect 2.0 so that he can control his Z-Wave automation devices remotely. This is a problem, and it's the problem we're here to solve.

Just to recap, we have a VISTA-20P Panel that is working, and it can communicate alarm signals via the cellular path. It can also be controlled via Total Connect 2.0 through the cellular path. We have a Honeywell Home Tuxedo that is working, and it can communicate with the panel through its hardwired keypad bus connection, but it can't communicate to TC2 through the internet. This means there is no way to remotely control Z-Wave Automation devices. Finally, we have an LTE dual-path communicator that is working on the cellular path, but not on the internet path.

The Solution

Basically, what this requires is a way to send a command from Total Connect 2.0 to the VISTA-20P Panel through the communicator's cellular connection. This command must be something that the panel can perform based on an entry from a keypad. In this case, we are going to enter a command via the TC2 keypad that will cause a programmable output to change state. This output is connected to a zone on the panel. When the output changes state, it will fault the zone. Then, based on the programming in a scene, the Tuxedo will turn the Z-Wave Module that is connected and providing power to the router OFF. This will drop power to the router. After a few seconds, another command will be entered through the keypad which will restore the zone, and a second scene will tell the Tuxedo that a restore on the zone causes the Z-Wave module to turn back ON. This will restore power to the router.

Here are the full details for this solution:

The first step in setting this up is making sure that you have an available zone to use as your triggering zone. If you have one of the hardwired zones on the panel available, then you can actually use Output 18, Trigger 2 for this purpose. Any of the hardwired zones 2 thru 8 can be used with this trigger. You can also use Output 17, Trigger 1, but it provides more current than Trigger 2, so we recommend that you save it for other potential uses. If you don't have one of these zones available, then you can use a zone on a Honeywell 4219 or 4229 8-zone expander, but this will also require the use of a relay instead of a trigger. If you are using the 4229, it has two (2) programmable relays built into it. If you are using the 4219, then you will need to add a Honeywell 4204. It is also possible to use a zone input from a wireless zone, such as a Honeywell 5816, along with one of the above mentioned relays.

One reason we love using Trigger 2, Output 18 for this is because it's so simple. Output 18 is already enabled in panel programming location *79, and as long as its programming hasn't been changed from the default, no additional programming is required for the output to work. However, there is still the matter of programming the zone to be used. In our example, we show Output 18, Trigger 2 connected to Zone 03. As you can see in the diagram below, we have connected the trigger to the Hi side of the zone, on terminal 12. As mentioned before, you can use this configuration on any of the Zones 02 thru 08, connecting the trigger wire to the Hi side of the zone. The reason you can't use this on Zone 01 is because the Zone 01 negative is completely isolated from all other negative terminals on the board. In order for the trigger to work to fault the zone, it must be common to the zone negative when the trigger is activated.


If you need to use a relay instead of the trigger, you will need to wire the relay to the zone so that when you turn the Relay ON, it faults the connected zone, and when you turn the Relay OFF, it restores that zone. The way this must be done will depend on the type of zone it is being connected to. When using a 5816 with the input terminals, you will need to wire one terminal of the transmitter to the relay's Common (C) and the other terminal to the relay's Normally Closed (NC). If you're using an expansion zone on a Honeywell 4219 or Honeywell 4229, then the wiring used for this zone, and whether or not an End-of-Line Resistor (EOLR) is used, will depend on how the rest of the zones on that expander are configured, as well as on the age of the expander. Earlier versions required an EOLR for each zone, while newer versions provide an option not to use the EOLR, based on the setting of a dip switch. The important thing to know here is that when a 4204 or 4229 relay is OFF, it has continuity between Common (C) and Normally Closed (NC). When it is ON, it has continuity between Common (C) and Normally Open (NO).


With the output wiring out of the way, we can move on to programming the zone. We're not going to go through the entire zone programming process. You can find information about how to program a zone on a VISTA-20P Panel in this FAQ. The two important things to know when it comes to zone programming are the Zone Type and the Hardwire Type. The Zone Type should be set to Zone Type 23, No Alarm Response. This Zone Type was specifically created to allow the panel to activate outputs based on a zone's change of state. Basically, Zone Type 23 allows the panel to recognize that a fault and/or fault restore has occurred on a zone, without it having to display a fault for that zone, or take any other action with regard to the zone itself. Zone Type 23 will never show a fault, and it will never cause an alarm condition. The Hardwire Type should be set to Normally Open (Entry 2 when prompted). Again, see the FAQ linked above for full details on zone programming. The Hardwire Type programming of Normally Open is specifically meant for use with the trigger connection shown above. If using a relay instead of a trigger, the Hardwire Type or Input Type setting may need to be different, depending on your wiring configuration, and the zone number.

The next step is to pair the Z-Wave module with the Honeywell Home Tuxedo. As always, we recommend that you first Exclude or Remove the Z-Wave device using the Tuxedo, before attempting to Include or Add the device. The reason we always recommend doing this is because devices are often joined to a Z-Wave network at the factory as part of Quality Assurance (QA). In many cases, once the device has been successfully joined to the test network, it is never cleared, and is simply packaged and sold as it is. Once a Z-Wave device has been paired with a network, it holds onto that network information until it receives a command telling it to forget the old network so that it can join a new one. The process of Excluding or Removing, is what tells a Z-Wave device to forget the old network. It's fortunate that any Z-Wave controller can tell any Z-Wave device to forget its old network!

A word about which Z-Wave module to use. You can use either an in-wall switch, or a plug-in module. If your Z-Wave Automation Controller supports Z-Wave Plus, then we always recommend using a Z-Wave Plus device. Although any Z-Wave controller can support just about any Z-Wave module, a Z-Wave Plus module loses its Z-Wave Plus attributes, including extended range and battery life, when used with an older Z-Wave controller. We like the idea of using a plug-in module, as it allows you to easily move your router if you begin to have range or interference issues.

Once the Z-Wave module has been learned into the Tuxedo, VAM, or Tuxedo Touch WIFI you then need to create a scene which will tell the module to turn OFF when Zone 3 (or whatever zone you choose to use) is faulted. You will need to program a second scene to tell the same module to turn ON when Zone 3 is restored. The easiest way to perform this programming is through Total Connect 2.0. We like to program scenes using the website, the examples that follow will assume that is how the scenes are being setup.

After logging into Total Connect 2.0, choose the menu option for scenes. If you do not see this option, contact your alarm dealer, and be sure that your account is properly configured, and that your monitoring plan includes access to Automation. For Alarm Grid customers, this would be our Silver Plan (Self or Full), or higher. After clicking on Scenes, choose Create Scene.


This will take you through a scene creation wizard. The first step is to name the Scene. This should be something easy to distinguish from other scenes, such as "Router Off". After choosing Continue, you will see where you can choose how the scene will be triggered. In our case, we want Triggered by a device, and when we expand this option, we then want to expand the section titled Sensors. Under Sensors, we see Zone 3, which we have named Router. When we expand this option, we can choose that this scene will activate when Zone 3 is Open (faulted) or Closed (restored). We intend to turn OFF the Z-Wave device when Zone 3 is faulted, so we will choose "When it is open".


After choosing which zone(s) you want to trigger the Z-Wave device, you will be taken to Step 3 of the scene creation wizard. In this step, you will choose which device (or devices) you want to control, and whether you want them to turn ON or OFF. This is our Router OFF scene, so we set our action accordingly.

Now that we have created an initial scene, in order to add the second scene (the one that will turn the router power back on) we need to click the + symbol in the upper right of the Scenes screen.


The programming for this scene will be almost identical to the first scene. We still want to trigger by device. The device is Sensor 3, which we named ROUTER, and we want the Z-Wave device to be turned ON when Sensor 3 is Closed, meaning the fault on the zone is restored. Here's the summary for the second scene.


That is the end of the programming and wiring for this solution. The final step is for our hero to manually activate Trigger 2, Output 18 through the keypad screen in Total Connect 2.0. Do this by entering the following command:

4-Digit Code + [#] + [7] + [18]

By entering this command, we're telling Output 18, Trigger 2 to activate. When it activates, it connects to ground. This ground is common to the Lo side of Zone 3. This causes a short on the zone (which is why we programmed it as Normally Open), which in turn causes it to fault. The fault on Zone 3 causes the Z-Wave device being used to power the router to turn OFF, powering the router down.

After around 20 seconds, our hero should enter the following command to restore Zone 3:

4-Digit Code + [#] + [8] + [18]

By entering this command, we are telling Output 18, Trigger 2 to deactivate. When it deactivates, the trigger disconnects from ground. This opens the circuit on Zone 3, causing it to restore from a faulted condition. This in turn causes the Z-Wave device being used to power the router to turn it back ON, powering the router back up. Once more, keep in mind that this option is only available because the customer in question, our hero, chose to use a dual-path communication method. If he had chosen to use an IP only connection, there would be no way for him to initiate the keypad command through Total Connect 2.0 that gets this ball rolling.

If you happen to be using a relay instead of the trigger output, there will be a few minor tweaks that you will need to make to this process. One of those tweaks will be the output number that you will use when performing this command. The FAQ that we linked in the second paragraph above goes into more detail on how to set this up using a relay, including covering the programming required in programming location *79.

If you need further assistance using this setup with a relay, feel free to reach out to us at support@alarmgrid.com. Our technical support staff are available M - F from 9:00 am to 8:00 pm Eastern. We will have some closures soon due to the holidays, so pay attention to our blog for information about when those will be. As always, we look forward to hearing from you!

Tags: , , ,

Comments


Posted By

Resideo has announced that 17 million shares of common stock will soon be available in a public offering. According to Resideo, the proceeds will be used to repay borrowings and to help fund growth and acquisitions. The news comes after Resideo posted abetter-than-expected Q3 for 2020.


Resideo trades on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) under the ticker REZI. The security, automation and comfort company had its initial public offering (IPO) in late 2018 after being spun-off from Honeywell. The news of the 17 million shares being available in a public offering resulted in a 14% decline in the company's stock price during Monday trading.

For the transaction of 17 million shares, Morgan Stanley and Evercore ISI will act as lead joint book-running managers. Additional bookrunners on the transaction include Bank of Ameria Securities and JPMorgan. Underwriters are being given the options to purchase an aggregate of up to 2.55 million additional Resideo common stock shares.

In the company's most recent earnings report, $1.36 billion in revenue was said to have been achieved in Q3 of this year. This greatly exceeded the consensus expert estimate of $1.15 billion. Year over year revenue for Resideo has increased by 10%. Resideo President and CEO Jay Geldmacher has recently expressed great optimism in demand trends for the security industry as the market enters into the final stretch of 2020.

Resideo is arguably best known for its state-of-the art Honeywell Lyric Alarm System, which boasts 128 wireless zones, encrypted sensor options, backwards compatibility with legacy Honeywell 5800 Sensors, integrated WIFI, built-in Z-Wave home automation, Apple HomeKit compatibility, a 7-inch touchscreen display, and local end user programming. The company also offers the new Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS Alarm Panel, the Honeywell LYNX Touch Panels, and the Honeywell VISTA Alarm Systems.

If you are interested in setting up a Resideo Security System in your home or business, then please feel free to email us at support@alarmgrid.com with any questions you might have. We check our email from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. Also remember to check out our monitoring page to learn more about the services we offer. We look forward to hearing from you!

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Comments


Posted By

If you are a Honeywell VISTA System user, then you have likely heard about the Honeywell Home Tuxedo Keypad. The Tuxedo serves as a touchscreen keypad controller, and also as a Z-Wave Plus hub. But one limitation for the unit is that it cannot be configured as a secondary Z-Wave controller.


Setting up a hub as a secondary Z-Wave controller involves pairing it with a separate Z-Wave hub, which will serve as the primary. When you do this, all Z-Wave devices paired with the primary controller will be automatically pushed over to the secondary, as long as they are compatible. These devices will also remain on the primary controller, meaning that you can operate them from both hubs.

If you decide to use this type of setup, it is advised that you clear all Z-Wave devices enrolled with the secondary controller, and instead enroll them with the primary controller beforehand. Then perform the process of setting up the secondary controller to the primary. This will ensure that all of the Z-Wave devices you want to use are available on both controllers.

Remember, Z-Wave devices paired with the secondary controller will not be pushed over to the primary. When you get a new Z-Wave device, you must enroll it at the primary Z-Wave controller, not the secondary. In most cases, Honeywell Z-Wave Hubs are used as secondary controllers, and Z-Wave devices paired directly with the primary controller are then shared with the Honeywell Z-Wave Controller. One of the most common primary Z-Wave hubs to use for this type of setup is Samsung SmartThings. Other popular third party Z-Wave hubs should work just as well.

Being able to set up a Z-Wave hub as a secondary controller, is technically one of the more advanced Z-Wave functions that you would ever try to perform on a smart home automation network. But while it is quite advanced, it is also very standard. It is somewhat unusual to encounter a Z-Wave automation controller with no primary and secondary configuration options. But that's exactly the case with the Honeywell Home Tuxedo. You can't set it as a secondary Z-Wave controller, which is a big letdown for anyone who wants to use the device in conjunction with a different Z-Wave hub, such as Samsung SmartThings.

According to Resideo, the ability to set the Tuxedo as a secondary Z-Wave controller will come from a future firmware update. At this time, we do not have any estimate for when such a firmware update would be made available. If you want to learn more about firmware updates for a Tuxedo Keypad, please refer to this FAQ.

However, we can speculate that once the feature is available, you will be able to configure Tuxedo primary/secondary options by starting from the main keypad screen, and choosing the Devices option, followed by the Z-Wave Setup button at the bottom of the screen, and then selecting More in the lower-right corner. If you do that now, you will notice that the "Learn Mode" option currently does not exist.


Remember to stay tuned to our blog for future updates on the Honeywell Home Tuxedo. We will be sure to let you know about any new features made available for the keypad. If you have any questions about the Tuxedo or Z-Wave home automation, please feel free to email us at support@alarmgrid.com. We check our email from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Comments


Posted By

Alarm Grid is proud to offer the Honeywell Lyric LCP500-L24 with 24-Hour Backup Battery. This deal comes with the same great Honeywell Lyric Alarm System that is loved by thousands of Alarm Grid monitored customers, plus an extended LCP500-24B Battery for longer runtime during power outages.


Like most security systems, the Lyric uses a backup battery to stay running when the system experiences AC power loss. This can occur during electrical outages, or when the system's plug-in transformer has been disconnected. Traditionally, the Lyric System comes with a standard 4-hour battery called the Honeywell LCP500-4B.

But with our special Honeywell LCP500-L24 deal, you can get a Lyric System that includes the Honeywell LCP500-24B 24-Hour Backup Battery. This bundled deal is less expensive than buying the Lyric System and the LCP500-24B separately a la carte, so taking advantage of this offer is strongly advised. The battery is advertised to keep the Lyric Alarm Panel and its connected accessories running for at least 24 hours during power outages.

Normally, the Lyric comes with the 4-hour LCP500-4B Battery pre-installed. When you order the Honeywell Lyric LCP500-L24 Deal, your Lyric System will arrive with no battery installed. The 24-hour LCP500-24B Battery will be included in the package separately. You will need to open up the Lyric Panel and connect the battery during setup. We recommend doing this prior to powering on the system using its included plug-in transformer. For more information on powering the Honeywell Lyric, please see this FAQ.

In addition to powering the Lyric, the LCP500-24B will also keep any connected system accessories running. Most notably, this includes the system's communicator that is used for monitoring service. The Lyric has a built-in WIFI card for connecting to the internet, and you can also add a cellular communicator to provide an additional communication pathway for the system. This is important because an internet outage, which often accompanies a power outage, would otherwise take your system offline, even if the panel itself remains powered on with its battery backup during this time.

Available cellular communicator options for the Honeywell Lyric include the Honeywell LYRICLTE-A AT&T LTE Communicator and the Honeywell LYIRICLTE-V Verizon LTE Communicator. Alarm Grid also sells the Honeywell LYRICUPGRADE-A and the Honeywell LYRICUPGRADE-V bundles that include the Lyric System and one of the aforementioned cellular communicators. Keep in mind that our Lyric LTE bundles only come with the standard 4-hour battery, so you must buy the Honeywell LCP500-24B Battery separately if you want to provide an extended backup power option for your Lyric. Remember that you will need a monitoring plan that includes cellular service in order to use a cellular communicator with your Lyric System. Examples of monitoring plans that include cellular service are the Alarm Grid Gold Level Plans, the Alarm Grid Platinum Level Plans, and the Alarm Grid Cell-Only Plan. More information on all our monitoring plans can be found here.

The Honeywell Lyric is one of the top security systems on the market today. We love the Lyric and its 7-inch touchscreen display, support for 128 wireless zones, local end user programming, built-in Z-Wave, Apple HomeKit compatibility, and its ability to interface with the Total Connect 2.0 platform for controlling the system remotely though a mobile app or web browser. This is truly a state-of-the-art alarm system, and it gets even better with its extended 24-hour backup battery to stay running when it matters most.

If you want to learn more about Lyric, or if you are interested in starting alarm monitoring service, please email us at support@alarmgrid.com. We will review your message at our earliest convenience and reply back as soon as possible. Our team checks emails during our usual business hours of 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you soon!

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Comments


Posted By

Resideo, which trades on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) under the acronym REZI, saw its stock price increase by more than 40% during market trading on November 5, 2020. The substantial price boost occurred thanks to an excellent third quarter (Q3) that greatly exceeded expectations.


In the company's most recent earnings report, Resideo stated that it had achieved roughly $1.36 billion in revenue for Q3. This is much higher than the consensus estimate of $1.15 billion. Resideo has enjoyed a 10% increase in revenue year over year. The company says that it expects Q4 revenue to be between $1.36 billion and $1.41 billion.

Thanks to this positive news, REZI opened Thursday at $14.20 after closing at just $11.35 the day prior. REZI enjoyed further increases throughout most of Thursday trading, as the stock price soon rose above $15. The price stayed in the $15 range during most of the day, though it did exceed the $16 threshold at times.

Resideo President and CEO Jay Geldmacher said in a recent press release, "Our revenue performance and the progress with our ongoing transformation and cost reduction initiatives enabled us to strengthen our liquidity position, and in late October we made all outstanding reimbursement agreement payments to Honeywell... While we are closely monitoring our operations and supply chain for impacts related to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are encouraged by the strong demand trends we are seeing across our end markets as we close out 2020.”

The reimbursement agreement payments that Geldmacher is referring to come from an agreement between Honeywell and Resideo after Resideo was spun-off from Honeywell in late 2018. At the end of October 2020, Resideo paid Honeywell $35 million for a payment that was deferred on April 30, 2020, as well as an additional $35 million for a regularly scheduled payment.

Resideo also mentioned some highlights in its earnings report. Their ADI Global Distribution segment saw an 11% revenue increase to $790 million. Their Products & Solutions segment enjoyed a 12% revenue increse to $572 million. Their gross margin rate increased by 200 basis points (BPS) to 27.2%. Operating income for the company is up 122% year over year, with net income up 838% year over year, and diluted earnings per share (EPS) up 900% year over year. And their adjusted EBITDA increased by 65% to $188 million.

Alarm Grid supports many Resideo Security Systems for alarm monitoring service. If you want to learn how you can monitor your home or business, please contact our team via email at support@alarmgrid.com. We check our email from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

Tags: , ,

Comments


Posted By

Alarm Grid is thrilled to announce that our Honeywell Lyric LTE Upgrade Kits now feature the Honeywell LCP500-24B 24-Hour Backup Battery. You can pick between the LYRICUPGRADE-A with AT&T LTE and the LYRICUPGRADE-V with Verizon LTE. Rest easy in knowing that your Lyric will stay connected!


Our Lyric LTE Upgrade Kits represent the ultimate option for anyone who wants to be sure that their monitored security system will always stay online and connected. These systems come with built-in WIFI and added communication modules that provide cellular backup. Even if your home or business experiences an internet outage, the cellular backup will keep your system reliably monitored. Cellular connectivity almost never goes down, so you will have peace of mind in knowing that you are consistently protected. This is crucial for receiving the most reliable and dependable alarm monitoring service available!

But these aren't just any cellular communicators. These are LTE cellular communicators that will receive network support for many years to come, possibly for even decades. As older 3G and CDMA networks are soon being shut down in an event commonly referred to as the 3G Sunset, users are being urged to upgrade to LTE as soon as possible. The term LTE stands for "Long-Term Evolution", and cellular companies like AT&T and Verizon have promised to support their LTE networks well into the very distant future. These networks are expected to remain running as important backups to the 5G networks, which you have likely heard about. With an LTE communicator like those included in these kits, you won't have to worry about making any communication upgrade to your Lyric any time in the foreseeable future.


The new change to these LTE upgrade kits is that they now include a 24-hour backup battery instead of the prior 4-hour backup battery. Your Lyric Security System will rely on this backup battery to stay running when the electricity is out and AC power is unavailable. The backup battery represents the last line of defense for a security system in staying powered on and connected for monitoring service in these crucial moments. Being able to keep your Lyric Alarm Panel running and connected for 24 hours versus 4 hours will give you much more confidence and peace of mind when a sudden power outage occurs. And even during an extended outage, your home or business will be protected. This is the perfect complement to LTE cellular connectivity, which works perfectly when your internet router is down and unable to provide WIFI service for your system.

Of course, these kits wouldn't be complete without the state-of-the-art Honeywell Lyric Alarm System. This security panel includes a full-color 7-inch touchscreen display, support for up to 128 panel zones, the ability to interface with Honeywell SiX Series Sensors that use military-grade 128-bit AES encryption, built-in Z-Wave capability for smart home devices, and full compatibility with Apple HomeKit, the robust and powerful automation platform for iOS users.


Both the Honeywell LYRICUPGRADE-A and the Honeywell LYRICUPGRADE-V come with a brand-new Honeywell Lyric Alarm System with plug-in transformer, an LTE communicator, and a fully prepared Honeywell LT-Cable for conveniently providing system power. Whether you choose the LYRICUPGRADE-A with AT&T LTE or the LYRICUPGRADE-V with Verizon LTE will not make much of a difference. This decision will have no impact on your monthly monitoring costs, and we have found both cellular networks to work great when adequate signal coverage is obtained. Just go with the network that provides the most reliable and consistent coverage in your area. If you aren't sure, coverage maps are widely available. Remember that this decision has nothing to do with your personal phone. You can have an AT&T Phone and get a Verizon Communicator for your system, or vice-versa.

Also keep in mind that you will need a cellular monitoring plan to take advantage of all the cellular communication capabilities of your new Honeywell Lyric LTE Security System Kit. Examples of compatible monitoring plans include the Gold and Platinum Plans from Alarm Grid. We advise checking out our monitoring page for more information about signing-up. And if you have any questions, you can always email us at support@alarmgrid.com for extra assistance. We check our email during our usual business hours of 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you and helping you get started with your new Lyric System!

Update: These kits no longer include the 24-hour battery. They once again include the standard Lyric 4-hour battery. We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Comments


Posted By

Alarm Grid has discovered a recent manufacturing mistake that has affected some Honeywell 5822T Garage Tilt Sensor units. The issue has resulted in the internal tilt detector for the affected units being positioned upside-down. We apologize to anyone who may have received an affected unit.


Inside every Honeywell 5822T is a pair of cylindrical metal pieces. These metal pieces represent the sensor's internal tilt detector that is used to determine whether the garage door that is being monitored is opened or closed. Because of a recent manufacturing error, the internal tilt detector for these sensors was positioned upside-down.

The following picture shows the tilt detection sensor in the proper position. Note how it is positioned facing the upper portion of the sensor.


And now here is a picture of a Honeywell 5822T where the tilt detector has been positioned improperly. Note how the metal cylindrical pieces are positioned facing the sensor's bottom.

At this time, we are not entirely sure of the date ranges for the affected sensors. So far, we have only seen incorrectly manufactured Honeywell 5822T units with a date code of D227, which represents August 14, 2020. We have also seen newer Honeywell 5822T units with a date code of D255, which represents September 11, 2020 that do not have this issue. Based on that info, it's likely that Resideo has already corrected the mistake in manufacturing, and we are only just now discovering the issue due to reports from customers.

Below is a picture of the date code for one of the improperly manufactured 5822T units. Note that D represents the year 2020, while 227 represents the 227th day of the year, or August 14th, with 2020 being a leap year.


The good news is that the improperly manufactured units are still usable. When using the 5822T as a garage tilt sensor (Loop 3), you just need to mount the unit upside-down so that the internal tilt detector is facing the proper direction. Normally, these devices are mounted at the top of the garage door with the arrow pointing upward. If you find that you have an affected unit, just mount the sensor in the same location with the arrow pointing downward. If you are only using the Honeywell 5822T as a wireless transmitter (Loop 1), then you can position it in any direction, as that function is unaffected by the manufacturing error.

The picture below shows the arrow on the outside of the Honeywell 5822T. The sensor is typically installed with the arrow facing upward, but an affected unit can be used for regular operation by being installed with the arrow facing downward.

If you have any questions about the Honeywell 5822T, please reach out to us by emailing support@alarmgrid.com. This is also a great email to use if you are interested in starting monitoring service with Alarm Grid. We check our email from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

Tags: , , , , , ,

Comments


Posted By

A great way to build out your Honeywell Lyric is with Honeywell 5800 Sensors. These are simple, 345 MHz wireless sensors that you can easily enroll with the system for security, life-safety, and environmental monitoring. They are perfect for expanding your system and making it more robust.

Honeywell lyric controller encrypted wireless security system

When you want to pair a Honeywell 5800 Sensor with the Lyric, the process is very straightforward. Put the Lyric in its auto-enrollment mode by choosing Security > Tools > enter Installer Code (default 4112) > Program > Zones > Add New > Serial Number. Make sure the RF Type on the right-hand side is set to 5800. Then activate the sensor either by faulting it or triggering its cover tamper switch. The Lyric should beep to confirm that it received a signal transmission. Then activate the sensor a second time to have the Lyric display the Serial Number. The third activation will confirm the Serial Number and return you to the screen where you can configure the zone settings.


Programming the zone settings for the sensor is actually quite simple. Depending on how you enrolled the sensor, you may need to adjust the Loop Number. This is almost always the case if you enrolled the sensor by activating its tamper switch. Refer to the instruction manual for the 5800 Sensor to determine which Loop Number to use.

The two (2) Zone Descriptors and the Device Type serve as the name for the sensor. You should choose a name that will help you identify the sensor, e.g. "Front Bedroom Motion Sensor", "South Hallway Door", etc. The Response Type determines how the system responds when the sensor is faulted. See our list of Lyric Response Types for more info.

Alarm Report should be set to Yes if you want the system to report out through AlarmNet to a Central Station if the zone causes an alarm on the system. That is an essential component of alarm monitoring services. Chime is optional, and it has the panel emit any one of several available sounds when the zone is faulted. Supervision tells the panel to look for an RF check-in signal from the sensor periodically to ensure that it is online. Click Save in the bottom-right after you finish adjusting the settings.


Keep in mind that only uni-directional (one-way) sensors from the Honeywell 5800 Series can be used with the Lyric. This leaves out bi-directional devices like the Honeywell 5800WAVE Siren, the Honeywell 5828 Keypad, and the Honeywell 5800RL Relay Module, so make sure you do not buy those for the Lyric. But you still have a lot of excellent sensors and security devices to choose from.

Below is a list of the Honeywell 5800 Sensors that you can use with the Honeywell Lyric:

Sensor Name
Notes
Honeywell 5800MINI
Honeywell 5800mini interior wireless door and window sensor
Door/Window sensor. Uses Loop 1.
Honeywell 5800PIR-RES
Honeywell 5800pir res wireless pet immune motion detector close up
PIR motion sensor. Uses Loop 1.
Coverage Area: 35' x 40'
Honeywell 5816
Honeywell 5816 wireless door window sensor
Door and window sensor.
Loop 1 = Terminal Block for NC Contact
Loop 2 = Reed Switch
Honeywell 5811
Honeywell 5811 wireless wafer thin door and window sensor
Door and window sensor. Uses Loop 1.
Honeywell 5800C2W
Honeywell 5800c2w hardwire to wireless system 9 zone conversion module
9-zone wired to wireless converter. Allows hardwired sensors to communicate with the Lyric as wireless devices. All zones use Loop 1 and a unique Serial Number ID.
Honeywell 5800CO
Honeywell 5800co wireless carbon monoxide detector
Carbon monoxide sensor.
Loop 1 = CO Detection
Loop 2 = End of Sensor Life (separate programming only required on TURBO and other V-Plex panels)
Honeywell 5800COMBO
Honeywell 5800combo smoke heat and co detector
Combination, smoke, heat, CO, and low-temperature sensor. Uses up to five (5) zones on the Lyric Panel. Has two (2) Serial Numbers for enrollment purposes.
Loop 1, SN 1 = Smoke/Heat Detection
Loop 2, SN 1 = Smoke/Heat Maintenance
Loop 3, SN 1 = Low Temperature Detection
Loop 1, SN 2 = CO Detection
Loop 2, SN 2 = End of Sensor Life (separate programming required only on TURBO and other V-Plex panels)
Honeywell 5800FLOOD
Honeywell 5800flood wireless flood and temperature sensor
Flood and temperature sensor.
Loop 1 = Low Temperature Detection
Loop 2 = High Temperature Detection
Loop 3 = Flood Detection
Honeywell 5800MICRA
Honeywell 5800micra wireless recessed window contact
Recessed window sensor. Uses Loop 1.
Honeywell 5800PIR
Honeywell 5800pir exterior of wireless motion detector
PIR motion sensor.
Loop 1 = Low Sensitivity Motion.
Loop 2 = High Sensitivity Motion.
Loop 3 = Low Temperature Detection
Coverage Area: 35' x 40'
Honeywell 5800PIR-COM
Honeywell 5800pir com exterior of wireless long range motion det
Commercial PIR motion sensor.
Loop 1 = Low Sensitivity Motion
Loop 2 = High Sensitivity Motion
Loop 3 = Low Temperature Detection
Coverage Area: 60' x 80'
Honeywell 5800PIR-OD
Honeywell 5800pir od wireless outdoor motion detector exterior
Outdoor PIR motion sensor. Uses Loop 1.
Honeywell 5800PIR-OD2
Outdoor PIR motion sensor. Uses Loop 1.
Honeywell 5800RP
Honeywell 5800rp wireless repeater
Wireless repeater for Honeywell 5800 Sensors. Does not require enrollment, but can be assigned a single zone for RF supervision, low-battery, AC loss, and RF jam detection. This is done using Serial Number 1 with Loop 1, with DIP Switch 2 set in the OFF position. Can also use up to four (4) separate zones for supervision when DIP Switch 2 is set to ON. This is required for UL installations.
Honeywell 5800RPS
Honeywell 5800rps wireless recessed door and window plunger sens
Recessed door/window sensor. Uses Loop 1.
Honeywell 5800SS1
Honeywell 5800ss1 exterior of wireless shock sensor
Shock sensor. Uses Loop 1.
Honeywell 5802MN
Honeywell 5802 wireless panic button
Medical alert button. Uses Loop 1.
Honeywell 5802MN2
Honeywell 5802mn2 wireless dual button medical alert
Medical alert button. Uses Loop 1.
Honeywell 5802WXT
Honeywell 5802wxt wireless panic button
Panic button. Uses Loop 1.
Honeywell 5802WXT-2
Honeywell 5802wxt 2 wireless dual button medical alert
Panic button. Uses Loop 1.
Honeywell 5806W3
Honeywell 5806w3 wireless smoke detector
Smoke detector. Uses Loop 1.
Honeywell 5808W3
Honeywell 5808w3 wireless smoke and heat detector
Smoke and heat detector.
Loop 1 = Smoke & Heat Detection
Loop 3 = Low Temperature Detection
Honeywell 5809
Honeywell 5809 wireless heat detector
Fixed temperature and rate-of-rise heat detector. Uses Loop 1. Alarm occurs when the temperature exceeds 135 degrees Fahrenheit, or when the temperature rises more than 15 degrees Fahrenheit per minute.
Honeywell 5809FXT
Honeywell 5809 wireless heat detector
Fixed temperature heat detector. Uses Loop 1. Alarm occurs when the temperature exceeds 135 degrees Fahrenheit.
Honeywell 5809SS
Honeywell 5809ss wireless fixed temperature slash ror heat detec
Fixed temperature and rate-of-rise heat detector. Uses Loop 1. Alarm occurs at 135 degrees Fahrenheit or when the temperature rises more than 15 degrees Fahrenheit per minute.
Honeywell 5814
Honeywell 5814 wireless small door sensor and window sensor
Door and window sensor. Uses Loop 1.
Honeywell 5815
Honeywell 5815 white wireless aesthetic door sensor and window s
Door and window sensor.
Loop 1 = Terminal Block for NC Contact
Loop 2 = Reed Switch
Honeywell 5816MN
Honeywell 5816mn wireless mini door sensor and window sensor
Door and window sensor.
Loop 1 = Terminal Block for NC Contact
Loop 2 = Reed Switches
Honeywell 5816OD
Honeywell 5816od wireless outdoor door and window sensor top
Outdoor door and window sensor.
Loop 1 = Terminal Block for NC Contact
Loop 2 = Reed Switch
Honeywell 5817
Honeywell 5817 wireless three zone sensor
Three (3) zone door and window sensor & transmitter.
Loop 1 = NC or NO (DIP Switch Selectable) unsupervised. It does not use an End of Line Resistor (EOLR)
Loop 2, 3 = NC Only. Both are unsupervised with no EOLR used
Honeywell 5817CBXT
Honeywell 5817cb wireless commercial sensor
Three (3) zone commercial transmitter.
Loop 1 = Two (2) Terminals; Primary Loop supervised by 470k Ohm (yellow, purple, yellow, gold) EOLR. Resistor must ALWAYS be installed, even if Loop 1 is not programmed. If Loop 1 is used as a burglary zone, then Loop 4 must be programmed as a separate zone for Cover Tamper protection.
Loop 2 = NC Reed Switch
Loop 3 = Two (2) Terminals; NC Loop unsupervised, no EOLR required
Honeywell 5817XT
Honeywell 5817xt three zone universal transmitter
Three (3) zone door and window sensor & transmitter.
Loop 1 = NC or NO (DIP Switch Selectable) unsupervised with no EOLR required
Loop 2, 3 = Two (2) Terminal Blocks, NC Only
Honeywell 5818MNL
Honeywell 5818mnl wireless recessed door sensor and window senso
Recessed door and window sensor. Uses Loop 1. Not suitable for use in metal doors
Honeywell 5819
Honeywell 5819 wireless shock processor and sensor
Three (3) zone shock processor.
Loop 1 = NC for Inertia Style External Shock Sensor. This input provides a suitable fast loop response of from 1ms to 20ms, based on dip switch setting
Loop 2 = Reed Switch
Loop 3 = NC for Wired Contact, unsupervised with no EOLR required
Honeywell 5819S
Honeywell 5819s wireless shock sensor and transmitter
Shock sensor and contact sensor.
Loop 1 = Built-in Inertia Style Shock Sensor
Loop 2 = Reed Switch
Loop 3 = NC for Wired Contact
Honeywell 5819WHS
Honeywell 5819whs wireless transmitter with integrated shock sen
Three (3) zone shock processor.
Loop 1 = NC, Built-in Inertia Style Shock Sensor
Loop 2 = Reed Switch
Loop 3 = NC for Wired Contact
Honeywell 5820L
Honeywell 5820l super slim wireless door and window sensor
Slimline door and window sensor. Uses Loop 1.
Honeywell 5822T
Honeywell 5822t wireless garage tilt sensor
Garage tilt sensor.
Loop 1 = NC for Wired Contact, unsupervised, no EOLR used
Loop 3 = Tilt Switch
Honeywell 5834-2
Honeywell 5834 2 wireless 2 button security key fob
Two (2) button key fob. Dual-button inputs allowed. Uses three (3) loops total, for a possible three (3) inputs. Can only be used with the Lyric in Low-Security Mode (Green LED)
Honeywell 5834-4
Honeywell 5834 4 wireless 4 button security key fob for honeywell security systems
Four (4) button key fob. Dual-button inputs allowed. Uses two (2) Serial Numbers, which both use Loops 1, 2, 3, 4. Up to eight (8) inputs possible. Can only be used with the Lyric in Low-Security Mode (Green LED)
Honeywell 5834-4EN
Honeywell 5834 4en wireless enhanced 4 button security key fob
Four (4) button key fob. Dual-button inputs allowed. Uses two (2) Serial Numbers, which both use Loops 1, 2, 3, 4. Up to eight (8) inputs possible. Can only be used with the Lyric in Low-Security Mode (Green LED)
Honeywell 5853
Honeywell 5853 wireless glass break detector exterior
Glass break sensor. Uses Loop 1.
Honeywell 5869
Honeywell 5869 wireless commercial panic switch
Commercial panic switch. Uses Loop 1. Latches when tripped, key (provided) needed to reset it after it is tripped
Honeywell 5878
Honeywell 5878 wireless remote alarm keypad
Six (6) button key fob. Uses two (2) Serial Numbers, which both use Loops 1, 2, 3, 4. Up to eight (8) inputs possible.
Honeywell 5898
Honeywell 5898 wireless dual tec motion detector
Dual-tec motion sensor.
Loop 1 = Low Sensitivity Motion Sensor. Pet immunity is available for this loop. 50lb or 100lb pet immunity, selectable via DIP Switch 1
Loop 2 = High Sensitivity Motion Sensor.
Loop 3 = Temperature Sensor (High or Low, DIP Switch Selectable)
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Comments