DIY Security Systems Posts

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While many alarm panels have been outfitted with LTE cellular communicators to accommodate the 3G and CDMA Sunset, one system that is being left behind is the Honeywell L5100. Luckily, we have two (2) great panel upgrade options if you want to continue receiving cellular alarm monitoring.


Without getting too in-depth, the 3G and CDMA Sunset will leave the Honeywell L5100 with no functional cellular communicator option. This is because any Honeywell GSMVLP5-4G units that are currently activated for monitoring service will stop working once the associated AT&T 4G Network is shut down. If you are still using a Honeywell L5100 with a GSMVLP5-4G for cellular monitoring, then it is crucial that you upgrade to a new system as soon as possible. This is the only way that you can continue receiving cellular monitoring service. Remember, cellular connectivity represents the most reliable communication path available for an alarm system. We strongly urge you to not wait until the end of the 3G/CDMA Sunset.

Unless you have some specific knowledge of security systems, then you may have trouble determining which alarm panel you should get to replace your Honeywell L5100. That is where we are able to help. We have two (2) recommended systems if you are needing to upgrade. Both of these system options will allow you to continue using the majority of your existing sensors, and they will provide some great new features that you can take advantage of. We will briefly discuss both of these options so that you can make an informed decision.


Honeywell Lyric


If you want to stick within the Honeywell banner, then the Lyric is a great option. It has two (2) excellent LTE cellular communicator options in the Honeywell LYRICLTE-A AT&T LTE Communicator and the Honeywell LYRICLTE-V Verizon LTE Communicator, and it can readily support all of the one-way Honeywell 5800 Sensors used with the L5100. This system is preferred by users who want to continue using Total Connect 2.0, as well as any Honeywell IP Cameras. The makes the Lyric the go-to option if you are currently using security cameras with your L5100. The Lyric is also preferred if you are a regular iOS user, and you want to integrate your security system with your Apple HomeKit Network.


Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus 345 MHz

For L5100 users who don't necessarily feel married to Total Connect 2.0, and who also don't really care about HomeKit compatibility, jumping ship to a different manufacturer is an option. The Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus 345 MHz is hard to ignore. It can also support your existing one-way Honeywell 5800 Wireless Sensors right out of the box. You will need to make the switch from Total Connect 2.0 to Alarm.com, but this transition is fairly seamless if you don't have cameras set up. And while the IQ2+ might not have HomeKit, it does offer its own unique benefits like Z-Wave Plus functionality, automatic Bluetooth disarming, and partitioning support. You won't find any of those features on the Lyric. Just remember to choose the 345 MHz IQ2+ in the silver and white box to continue using your old Honeywell 5800 Sensors.


We're Here to Help!

There isn't a truly one-size-fits-all solution for existing Honeywell L5100 users. For some, the Lyric is the best option. But other users can get more mileage out of the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus 345 MHz. Although we gave you some general guidelines and considerations above, you may still want some more advice on which move to make. Our security system planners are happy to help you determine which system is right for you.

Upgrading early is the best way to ensure that you do not experience any interruptions in your monitoring service. If you are a Honeywell L5100 user looking to plan for the future, feel free to email our team at support@alarmgrid.com. We will check your email during our usual business hours of 9am to 8pm ET and respond back at our earliest opportunity. We look forward to helping you plan out the long-term security solution for your home or business!

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Alarm Grid is back with another video recap! We've got some great new videos to help you get the very most out of your security system. As always, we hope that you find the new videos to be informative and helpful. Let's check out the newest tutorial videos from the Alarm Grid team!

Install Honeywell LTE-XA or LTE-XV On VISTA-15P, VISTA-20P, VISTA-21iP

I show you how to add a Honeywell LTE-XA or Honeywell LTE-XV to a Honeywell VISTA P-Series Alarm Panel. The LTE-XA and LTE-XV are cellular communicators used by VISTA Alarm Panels to communicate with the AlarmNet servers. Adding a communicator to a VISTA System is necessary for getting it monitored and set up with the Total Connect 2.0 platform for controlling the system remotely. The communicator will use a 4-wire connection that is made at the panel's ECP bus.


Troubleshooting No Signal issue on Resideo LTE-XA or LTE-XV

In a follow up to the previous video, I show you the general troubleshooting steps to perform when there is no signal on a Honeywell LTE-XA or LTE-XV. As these are cellular modules, an adequate cell signal is required for them to work properly. You might get a lack of cell signal due to the communicator being used too far from a cell tower, a SIM card that needs to be re-seated, or due to a SIM card that is not yet activated.


Checking the ECP and RIS Address On a Tuxedo

I show you how to check the ECP Address and the RIS Address on a Honeywell Home Tuxedo Keypad. Both the ECP Address and the RIS Address are found in the same menu. The Enhanced Console Protocol (ECP) Address tells the panel where to find the Tuxedo as a keypad controller. Setting the ECP is sometimes referred to as addressing the keypad. The Remote Interactive Service (RIS) Address tells Total Connect 2.0 and AlarmNet where to find the Tuxedo as an automation controller.


Enrolling the DSC PG9914 Motion Sensor to a Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus

I show you how to pair the DSC PG9914 Motion Sensor with a Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus Security System. The DSC PG9914 is a PowerG Sensor, and it can be used with any version of the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus. The sensor offers a coverage area of up to 39 feet, pet immunity of up to 85 pounds, a wireless communication range of up to 2,000 feet away from the IQ Panel 2 Plus, and 128-bit AES encryption.


Upgrading a Honeywell Lyric to Use LTE

I show you how to upgrade the Honeywell Lyric Controller to support an LTE communicator. In order to do this, you will need a compatible LTE cellular communicator. The compatible modules include the Honeywell LYRICLTE-A AT&T LTE Communicator and the Honeywell LYRICLTE-V Verizon LTE Communicator. You will need to get a monitoring plan that includes cellular connectivity, such as an Alarm Grid Gold or Platinum Level Plan. This is necessary for activating the communicator for monitoring service.

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Sometimes we like to speculate about security system sensors and equipment that, for whatever reason, has yet to be announced for built by manufacturers. Today, we're going to discuss some sensor ideas that we wish existed in reality, but for now only remain ideas inside of our own heads.


Keep in mind that while these ideas may seem very plausible and realistic, they are still nothing more than ideas at this point. None of these ideas have been announced or mentioned by manufacturers, and it's likely that these concepts may never become a reality. This is just for fun, and we're merely floating around ideas. Don't get your hopes up and expect these sensors to be available on our website any time soon. And if you happen to be a manufacturer reading this, then take notes, as we think these products could be big hits.


PowerG Heat Sensor


The PowerG lineup is known for its excellent diversity, as it offers sensors of nearly all types. But one sensor that is noticeably absent from this lineup is a standalone heat sensor. We regularly get requests from Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus users who want a fire detection sensor for use in an area where a conventional smoke detector would be prone to false alarms. Such areas can include kitchens, garages, bathrooms, and attics.

We're pretty surprised that Johnson Controls hasn't produced a standalone heat sensor option for their PowerG lineup yet. It could be as simple as making it so that you can disable smoke detection on a dual-function smoke & heat sensor. This is already possible with the Honeywell SiXSMOKE, so we're sure this could be done for the DSC PG9936 as well. On that note, we would also love to see a PowerG equivalent to the Honeywell SiXCOMBO and finally give PowerG System users a truly complete life-safety sensor option with built-in smoke, heat, and carbon monoxide detection.


Honeywell SiX Series Recessed Contact

This is another one we're a little surprised isn't already a thing. While Resideo has been somewhat choosy about which sensor types to make available for the Honeywell SiX Series Lineup, most of the omissions are understandable. But the absence of a recessed door and window contact is a bit of a head-scratcher. Resideo has produced many wireless and wired recessed contacts in the past, so we're not quite sure why they would forget to make an encrypted option for the massively popular Lyric Controller. One theory we have its that they are afraid the wireless signal range would be too lackluster.

While quite not as popular as surface-mount contacts due to the hole-drilling that is required, recessed contacts are appreciated by many users who want an aesthetically pleasing install. It's not like Resideo doesn't already know this. We have seen them offer a wide selection recessed contacts in the past. The company previously went out of their way to make the Honeywell SiXMINICT after the standard Honeywell SiXCT was deemed by many to be too bulky. For now, Lyric users remain stuck using non-encrypted devices like the Honeywell 5818MNL if they want to add recessed door and window contacts to their systems.


Qolsys Dual-Tech Motion Sensor

We've gotten the impression in recent times that Qolsys isn't really making their 319.5 MHz S-Line Sensors a top priority, as they instead seem to be focusing on producing the best security panels possible. The most popular sensors for all versions of the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus are the PowerG Sensors, which are sold under the DSC banner. And it's very telling that the upcoming Qolsys IQ Hub is expected to only support PowerG Sensors and forgo legacy frequencies entirely. But that doesn't mean that Qolsys 319.5 MHz Sensors don't have their merits, and we think that a Qolsys Dual-Tech Motion Sensor would be quite useful.

A dual-tech motion sensor uses both passive infrared (PIR) and microwave detection technology to sense movement. This is opposed to a standard motion sensor that just uses PIR. The advantage to a dual-tech motion is that both its PIR sensor and its microwave sensor must be triggered before the sensor will activate. This can be crucial for false alarm prevention. Dual-tech motions are also known to offer pet immunity, which is often a major selling point for those with dogs and cats. We have seen dual-tech motion sensors made for many different security systems, and users typically have a decent selection to choose from.

But you're a bit out of luck if you need a 319.5 MHz wireless dual-tech motion, as Qolsys never seemed to make one. That's a bit of a letdown, especially considering that the 319.5 MHz version is the most popular model of the IQ Panel 2 Plus. At least the DSC PG9984P remains an option for that system, as well as any other system that can support PowerG.


More Fall Detection Sensors

Nortek Control changed the game for medical alert sensors when they introduced the 2GIG F1-345 Personal Safety Pendant with fall detection technology. Qolsys soon followed suit with their own Qolsys IQ Fall Pendant. Both of these sensors have built-in accelerometers for detecting the rapid change in movement that occurs during a slip and fall accident. They also retained the capability of a traditional medical alert button, as a user can press and hold the button to alert the system during an emergency. We thought that emergency fall sensors would become the next big thing.

But oddly enough, the development of new fall detection sensors seems to have stalled. We have yet to Resideo try their hand at a fall sensor with an accelerometer. The same is true for a potential release for the PowerG lineup from DSC. We're not quite sure what the hold up is, as the offerings from 2GIG and Qolsys have proven to be quite successful. Some members of our team have also proposed the idea of having these sensors send a second alert to the system if a prolonged period of no movement occurs following a detected fall, as such a scenario may indicate that the individual has seriously hurt themselves. There has also been talk of using rechargeable batteries for these devices, in order for the sensor to work for a longer time period before a battery replacement is needed.


Right now, these sensors are just ideas. But the best idea of all is to sign-up for alarm monitoring! Alarm Grid offers monitoring plans for all needs and budgets. We recommend checking our monitoring page for more information. If you are interested in getting started, please email us at support@alarmgrid.com. We check our email from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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Alarm Grid is excited to announce that we are making several new features available for monitored customers with access to Alarm.com for central station service. These include an In-App Panic, Alarm Cancel/Verify buttons, Subscriber ON/OFF Testing, and Zone Syncing with the central station.


The new features will be available to any Alarm Grid monitored customer with central station service whose monitoring plan includes access to the Alarm.com platform. In order to use most of these features, you will need to download the Alarm.com Mobile App, which is available for free from the Google Play Store and the Apple App Store. This app is great for operating your Alarm.com Security System from virtually anywhere.

By making these features available, we are hoping to improve accessibility and make it easier to control your system and communicate with the central station using the Alarm.com Mobile App. These features will be complementary as part of your Alarm Grid monitoring plan, and they will not result in any changes to your current monthly bill. Our team plans to automatically enable the features for all of Alarm.com customers with central station service.

We have been working very closely with our central station partner Criticom Monitoring Services (CMS) in recent weeks to get the features ready for our customers. As always, CMS has been excellent to work with, and we are confident that we will be able to make a seamless transition for the rollout. We expect to have the features implemented and ready for use sometime during the first week of October.


Let's now take a look at the new Alarm.com features and how you can use them to get the very most out of your security system.


In-App Panic Function

The Alarm.com In-App Panic Function will allow you to send a distress signal to the central station in the event of an emergency. By opening up the Alarm.com Mobile App, you will be able to trigger a Panic and let the central station know that you need help right away. The type of Panic(s) functions that are available will depend on the alarm panel you are using. These can include Audible Police, Silent Police, Fire, and Auxiliary Panics.

When using this feature, Panic Functions are classified as either Silent or Audible. This is based on the panel you are using. An Audible Panic will also be sent to the alarm panel so that a warning message can be displayed on the screen and any programmed sounders and sirens can be activated. Conversely, Silent Panic will result in no message being displayed on the panel, and the system will not produce any sounds.

The table below shows the different types of Panic functions and whether they are Silent or Audible for various Alarm.com Systems. Note how some panels will support both Silent and Audible options for a Police Panic. You will be able to choose the type of Panic to trigger within the Alarm.com App. Remember that Panic availability is determined by the panel you are using and is independent of panel programming. Alarm.com Panels without any true Panic button capabilities will only have a Silent Police Panic available.

Alarm Panel
Police Panic
Fire Panic
Auxiliary Panic
Interlogix Simon XT, XTi, XTi-5
Silent Silent Silent
Interlogix Concord
Silent Silent Silent
Interlogix NetworX
Silent Silent Silent
2GIG GC2 & 2GIG GC2e (FW 1.17.0.1+) Silent & Audible Silent Silent
2GIG GC3 & 2GIG GC3e
Silent Silent Silent
Qolsys IQ Panel & DSC Touch (FW 1.6.3+) Silent & Audible Audible Audible
Qolsys IQ Panel 2 & Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus
Silent & Audible Audible Audible
DSC Impassa
Silent Silent Silent
DSC PowerSeries NEO (Not in UL-Mode) Silent Silent Silent
DSC Iotega
Silent Silent Silent
DSC PowerSeries (Using SEM) Silent Silent Silent
Honeywell VISTA (Using SEM)
Silent Silent Silent

To use an Alarm.com In-App Panic, open the Alarm.com App, and expand the Panic option found within the Security System card. This option will have orange text and an exclamation mark (!) inside of a triangle icon. You can then press and hold the desired Panic function button for three (3) full seconds to trigger the Panic. Once triggered, you will have a three (3) second countdown during which you can cancel the Panic signal. After this time has elapsed, the notification will be sent to the central station right away so that help can arrive as soon as possible. Keep in mind that help will be sent to the location of the security system when the In-App Panic function is used.

Cancel & Verify Alarm Buttons

The Alarm.com Cancel Alarm and Verify Alarm buttons are designed to promote a more streamlined process when communicating with the central station during an alarm event. Not only can the Cancel/Verify feature help ensure a quicker response during an emergency, it can also help prevent false alarms and unnecessary dispatch in situations where no help is needed. The feature is optional, and a central station operator will still respond to an alarm normally if no input is made. But it can be very helpful when used properly.

In order for the buttons to be appear, two (2) conditions must be met. The first condition is that a programmed zone on the system has indicated an alarm condition. The second condition is that Alarm.com has received the alarm signal from the panel. Once both events have occurred, the green Cancel Alarm and the red Verify Alarm buttons will both appear at the top of the Alarm.com Mobile App. The buttons will only appear if the user is logged into an Alarm.com profile with Master-Level authority. You will know to check the app because of the text, email, and/or push notification you received about the alarm, based on your notification settings.

You have two (2) minutes to activate either the Cancel Alarm or Verify Alarm function after the buttons have appeared. The two minute timer comes from an estimate of how long it normally takes a central station operator to receive an incoming alarm, process it, and request emergency dispatch to the location. Remember that this is only an estimate. In some cases, a fast-acting central station operator might be able to perform pre-dispatch phone calls and request help before this time period has expired.

Activating the Cancel Alarm or Verify Alarm function is very simple. Just press and hold the corresponding button for thee (3) full seconds. The green Cancel Alarm button is on the left, and it informs the central station that the alarm occurred by accident and to not send any help. The red Verify Alarm button is on the right, and it tells that central station that the alarm is legitimate and to request dispatch immediately. Make sure you are very careful when using this feature to avoid making the wrong input.

Keep in mind that the central station and/or the local authorities might still call you to check in, even after receiving a Cancel or Verify message. The feature is simply used to quickly and efficiently transmit a signal to the central station to let the operator know what action they should take. It is also important to note that if multiple users from different logins try to make a selection, then only the first selection to go through successfully will be seen. Any other user who attempts to make a selection will get a message stating that another Master user has already responded.

Note: Alarm Grid's Central Station Partner Criticom Monitoring Services (CMS) will not process Alarm.com In-App Cancel Commands for Fire and Medical Alarms. CMS will follow the usual operating procedure for the account, even if an In-App Cancel Command is sent for a Fire or Medical Alarm Event.


Subscriber ON/OFF Test

The Subscriber ON/OFF Test feature allows a user to conveniently place their system on Test Mode with the central station through the Alarm.com Mobile App. When the system is in Test Mode, a central station operator will know to not request emergency dispatch to the location in the event of any incoming alarms. By using the Subscriber ON/OFF Test feature, your system will be placed on Test Mode for a set duration of time (1, 2, 4, or 8 Hours). Once you are finished, you can manually end the test or just wait for the timer to expire.

This false alarm prevention method serves as an alternative to calling the central station directly or using the MyAlarms.com feature to put your system on Test Mode. It is very important to always put your system on Test Mode prior to performing any action that may trigger any signal on your system that may normally result in an emergency dispatch . This includes testing any life-safety sensor, such as a smoke detector or carbon monoxide sensor, or testing the panic function on a key fob.

When you activate Test Mode using the Alarm.com App, a signal will be logged to the central station that will inform operators that the system is on Test. If an alarm occurs on your system, then an operator will still see the alarm. But they will also see the notification stating that your system is in Test Mode, and they will know not to contact you or request dispatch. Once the time period you have specified expires, or the mode is exited manually, then the Test Mode notification will disappear, and the central station operators will know to respond to any incoming system alarms in the usual manner.

In order to access this feature, open the Alarm.com Mobile App, and login to your account. Click the Menu Icon (three horizontal bars), and then select Monitoring Settings. Choose the option System Test Mode. You will be able to choose a Test Mode duration of 1, 2, 4, or 8 Hours. Your selection will be indicated with a checkmark. You can then press the blue Start Test Mode button to begin. A grey Stop Test Mode button will then appear if you want to exit Test Mode before the duration expires.


Zone Sync Function

Okay, this last feature is more for us than it is for you. But we still wanted to let you know about the Zone Sync function, as it changes the way that we will set up your Alarm.com Security System with the central monitoring station. Basically, it allows the Alarm.com servers to handle the process of transferring the zone description and other information from the security system to the central station during account creation and/or whenever the system's zones are updated. This information includes zone numbers and names that you have provided for zones on your Alarm.com account.

Traditionally, the process of transferring information from a security system to the Alarm.com servers had to be completed manually by a monitoring company. And really, that is still the case. The only difference now is that we can have Alarm.com automatically update the central station with the zones and their respective names, rather than having to type or write them out ourselves. An end user is still encouraged to contact us whenever they update any of the zones on their system so that a Zone Sync can be performed and we can be sure the new or edited zones get the proper dispatch instructions. We advise using the email mentioned at the end of this post for this purpose.


Get Started With Alarm.com

As we mentioned earlier, we plan to enable these features for all our Alarm.com customers with central station service sometime during the first week of October. These features will be enabled automatically, and no action is needed on your part if you are monitored with Alarm Grid for access to Alarm.com. You do have the option to opt out of any of these features if you want, but there is very little reason to do so. Remember, these new features are all complementary, and they will not increase your existing monthly bill.

If you are not yet monitored, and you are looking to start service with Alarm.com, then we are happy to help you get started. Your new service will include access to these new features. Any new customer wanting to start service, as well as any existing customer wanting to opt out of one or more of these features, should email us at support@alarmgrid.com. We will check your email during our regular business hours of 9am to 8pm ET M-F and reply back as soon as we can. We look forward to hearing from you and helping you use Alarm.com!

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It was a relatively calm week for our video team, but we still managed to put up a few new videos. Most of these are usual tutorial videos, but we did make one extra movie for fun at the end of the week. We hope you enjoy these videos. Let's check out the recap for September 18th thru 25th.

Programming a SiXFOB to the Lyric Controller

This video was actually uploaded super late last week, and it missed the last recap, so we decided to put it into this one! I show you how to program a Honeywell SiXFOB Key Fob with a Honeywell Lyric Alarm System. The Honeywell SiXFOB is a 4-button key fob that is great for arming, disarming, and triggering emergency panics. As a member of the Honeywell SiX Series, the Honeywell SiXFOB is designed exclusively for use with the Lyric System, and it uses 128-bit AES encryption for enhanced wireless security.


Remove All Devices Button On IQ Panel 2

I show you the Remove All Devices button in the Z-Wave Menu for the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus. This button serves as a reset for the system's internal Z-Wave Plus controller, and it clears all of the programmed Z-Wave devices from the system. Any Z-Wave device you want to continue using with the IQ Panel 2 will need to be re-added to the system. It will be necessary to clear these devices from the network before adding them back in, as they will still have residual Z-Wave data from when they were paired with the system originally.


Honeywell Home Tuxedo Is Not a Standalone Alarm Panel

I explain how the Honeywell Home Tuxedo Keypad is not a standalone alarm panel. Many users mistakenly believe that the touchscreen keypad is the actual alarm system. But in reality, the Tuxedo is just a keypad controller for a Honeywell VISTA System. The actual panel is usually found in a beige metal cabinet. This metal enclosure is often tucked away in a basement, attic, garage, or storage closet. Do not confuse the Honeywell Home Tuxedo with an actual Honeywell VISTA Security System.


Using Console Mode on a Honeywell Home Tuxedo

I show you how to use Console Mode on a Honeywell Home Tuxedo Keypad. Console Mode allows the Tuxedo to be used in the same way as an Alphanumeric Keypad, such as a Honeywell 6160. Putting the Tuxedo into Console Mode is necessary when programming the system. This includes adding, editing, and deleting system zones and making other various changes to the system settings. Remember that the Tuxedo will automatically reboot as soon as you exit system programming.


Connect Tuxedo Keypad to WIFI

I show you how to connect a Honeywell Home Tuxedo Keypad to a local WIFI network. The reason why the Tuxedo connects to WIFI is to send and receive automation commands from Total Connect 2.0. This internet connection also allows the Tuxedo to receive firmware updates from AlarmNet and display a weather forecast on the main screen. The Tuxedo Keypad can connect with both 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz WIFI networks. Wired ethernet connectivity cannot be used with the Tuxedo.


Mike's Birthday Punches

Okay, this isn't a security system video, but we needed to fit Jarrett into some video for the week. Jarrett punches me 28 times, in honor of my 28th birthday. Jarrett sure packed some heat into his punches, but I took it pretty decently if I do say so myself. I then made sure to remind the viewers to contact support@alarmgrid.com for monitoring information. I'll need to remember to pay Jarrett back on his birthday a few months from now!

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As you may know, the fall season began earlier this week. This means that cooler temperatures are on the way. If you want to prepare your home or business, then you will certainly want to consider getting some low-temperature freeze sensors. Nearly every system has good options available!

Freeze sensors alert your system when the temperature in the building drops to a dangerously low level, usually due to the HVAC system being broken. Having one of these sensors in your home or business is crucial for monitoring the building while you are away. The consequences of having below-freezing temperatures in your home or business can be dire. The pipes can freeze, and major damage can occur. Installing a freeze sensor is small price to pay to prevent this from happening.

Most freeze sensors are designed to alert a system before freezing temperatures occur. Usually, a freeze sensor will activate at or around 40°F to alert the system. This a little bit higher than 32°F, which is when water begins to freeze. This function is intentional, as the user will hopefully be alerted to the situation with enough time to take action. Many users will set up notifications on an interactive service platform used with their alarm systems so that they are notified via text and/or email when a freeze sensor activates while they are off-site. This is possible in both Total Connect 2.0 and Alarm.com.

The main thing to consider when choosing a freeze sensor is whether or not it will work with your security system. If you know which sensor lineups are compatible with your system, then you likely already have a good idea which sensors will work. But we'll list out some of the more popular options to get you started. A very versatile 345 MHz freeze sensor that will work with the Honeywell Lyric, the Honeywell LYNX Touch Panels, and any 2GIG Panel is the Honeywell 5821. This sensor can also be used for flood detection if a probe is added.


If you have a PowerG-compatible system, such as any version of the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus, then you might consider the DSC PG9905 Temperature Sensor. Many users prefer PowerG Sensors like the the PG9905 due to their superior wireless range and 128-bit AES encryption. If you have an original, non-Plus IQ Panel 2, then the 319.5 MHz Qolsys IQ Temp-S is a good choice. The Qolsys IQ Temp-S will utilize rolling code encryption when paired with the IQ Panel 2. Users of the 2GIG GC3e and 2GIG GC2e also have a good encrypted freeze sensor option in the 2GIG FT6e-345. There's also the non-encrypted 2GIG FT6-345 for users of the older 2GIG GC3 and 2GIG GC2 Systems.

Alarm Grid wants to help you keep your home or business comfortable this winter, as well as for many more winters to come. If you need help choosing a freeze sensor, then please don't hesitate to reach out to us. We are also happy to discuss monitoring services that you might use to receive alerts regarding a freeze sensor that activates while you are away from your home or office, The best way to reach us is to email support@alarmgrid.com. We check our email during our usual business hours of 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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Alarm Grid is here with another video recap! This time, we have nine (9) new videos to check out. Jarrett again stepped up this week and did a couple of videos. Our team is thrilled to have him back in the Alarm Grid studio. Let's take a look at the latest tutorial videos from Alarm Grid.

Assigning User Codes to Partitions On the IQ Panel 2 Plus

I show you how to assign user codes to different partitions on the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus. When you have partitions enabled on the IQ2+, you will need to assign partitions to every programmed user code. A user code will only be able to control a partition that it has been assigned. The system's Master Code, also known as the Admin Code, has access to every partition on the system. There are up to four (4) partitions available on the IQ2+.


Getting Into Z-Wave Programming on a Honeywell Home Tuxedo

I show you how to access Z-Wave programming on a Honeywell Home Tuxedo Keypad. In addition to serving as a touchscreen keypad for a Honeywell VISTA System, the Tuxedo is also used as a Z-Wave Plus controller. In order to add, remove, and edit any of the Z-Wave devices used with the Tuxedo, you must access the Z-Wave Programming Menu. This menu is easy to access so that you can begin quickly setting up your home automation network.


Opening the Honeywell SiXCOMBO

I show you how to open up the Honeywell SiXCOMBO Combination Smoke, Heat, and CO Detector. You will normally need to open up the SiXCOMBO to change the batteries and to access the inside sticker with important device information. The SiXCOMBO uses four (4) lithium CR123A batteries, also known as camera batteries, and it has an average battery life of five (5) years. The inner sticker includes information like the device's Serial Number, manufacture date, and more.


The Resideo Tuxedo is Not an Alarm Communicator

I explain how the Resideo Tuxedo is not an AlarmNet Communicator for a security system. Although the Tuxedo connects to a local WIFI network, it does not do so for the purpose of providing IP connectivity for the panel. The Tuxedo merely connects to the internet to relay automation commands from Total Connect 2.0 and for receiving firmware updates. The user must still add a compatible communicator to their VISTA System to set up alarm monitoring.


Using More Than One SkyBell With Total Connect 2.0

Jarrett explains how Total Connect 2.0 allows you to pair up to five (5) SkyBell Video Doorbell devices per account. The account does not need to include true video monitoring service for the SkyBell devices to work. If you want to use more than 5 SkyBell Video Doorbells with Total Connect 2.0, then it is necessary to sign-up for a second account. You can link the multiple accounts so that you can access them using the same login information.


Setting up Total Connect 2.0 Notifications

I explain how to setup text and email notifications in Total Connect 2.0. Text and email notifications help ensure that you are notified regarding any activity on your Honeywell Security System. This is very important for self-monitored users who do not have central station service, as they must receive these notifications and take proper action during emergencies. To set up notifications, you must create user profiles, assign phone numbers and/or email addresses to those profiles, then build notification groups and include the user profiles, and finally assign which notifications go to each group.


Changing the Battery in a Honeywell 5834-4

Jarrett shows you how to change the battery inside of a Honeywell 5834-4 Key Fob. The Honeywell 5834-4 uses a single lithium CR2032 coin battery for power. Expected battery life is roughly three (3) to five (5) years with typical usage. A Phillips screwdriver is needed to remove the back cover for the Honeywell 5834-4 and access the battery compartment. Make sure to observe proper polarity when inserting the new battery. The positive side for the CR2032 battery should be visible, once the battery has been inserted.


Using the Resideo Tuxedo Without an Alarm Panel

I explain how you can technically use the Resideo Tuxedo without an alarm panel. This is not commonly done, as the Tuxedo is primarily a keypad for a Honeywell VISTA System. But you do have the option of providing power to the Tuxedo and using it as a standalone automation controller for Z-Wave smart home devices. Some examples of Z-Wave devices that you can pair with the Tuxedo include smart lights, door locks, programmable thermostats, and more.


Install Honeywell LTE-XA or LTE- XV On a VISTA TURBO

I show you how to install a Honeywell LTE-XA AT&T LTE Communicator or a Honeywell LTE-XV Verizon LTE Communicator on a Honeywell VISTA TURBO Series Panel, such as a Honeywell VISTA-128BPT or a Honeywell VISTA-250BPT. The added communicator will allow the panel to communicate with the AlarmNet servers across a cellular network. This will allow the system to be monitored. The user will need a monitoring plan that includes cellular communication, such as an Alarm Grid Gold or Platinum Plan.

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As security professionals, we often encounter myths regarding security systems. There is a lot of untrue information out there, so we figured it would be a good idea to debunk a few security system myths to help end users understand the facts. Here are three false security system myths.


Myth #1 - Only Professionals Can Install a Security System

There was once a time when security systems were hardwired, and it was virtually impossible for a DIY user to install one. But with the rise of wireless alarm panels, many security systems can be installed using nothing more than a screwdriver. An end user can install their own system, program their own sensors, and get their system activated for monitoring service. Most wireless alarm panels even support desk mounts that allow a user to install a system without drilling holes in the walls. This can help a user save a lot of money by not having to hire a professional installer.

Myth #2 - Wireless Security Systems Are Not Secure

When wireless security systems first hit the market, many were easily defeated by third party devices. An intruder could block the signals from wireless sensors and prevent them from reaching the panel. They could also send false signals to the panel to make it appear as though a break-in was occurring, when really nothing was happening. But most modern wireless panels support encryption to prevent this from happening. This makes foul play all but impossible. There are many encrypted sensor options to choose from, including the Honeywell SiX Series Sensors for the Honeywell Lyric, the PowerG Sensors for the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus, and the eSeries Sensors for the 2GIG GC3e.

Honeywell sixminict wireless door slash window contact for lyric

Myth #3 - Security Systems Only Perform Security Functions

When shopping for a security system, many buyers only consider the security aspects. The reality is that a modern security system does so much more than just keep you and those around you safe. Nearly every security system on the market today also offers smart home automation capabilities. You can pair a variety of smart home devices with your system, including smart lights, door locks, programmable thermostats, and more. You can then control these devices from the panel and have them activate automatically with programmed smart scenes. And if your system is monitored, then you can control the devices from anywhere using a web browser or a mobile app on your phone.


Security systems today are more powerful and easier to use than ever before. Now is a great time to get started with a new security system for your home or business. Check out this post to learn more about the monitoring plans offered by Alarm Grid. If you're interested in getting started, then please email us at support@alarmgrid.com for more information. Our team checks email from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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We have another video recap lined up for you! This time there are three (3) new videos to check out. And this happens to be a very special video recap, because our fan-favorite technician makes his much-anticipated return! Let's take a look at the new Alarm Grid videos for September 11th.

Making All Partitions Sound on the Qolsys IQ Panel 2

The man. The legend. Jarrett is back, and he's going to talk about how you make all partitions sound on the Qolsys IQ Panel 2. When you enable partitions on the IQ Panel 2, only sensors on partition 1 will trigger sounds, by default. If you want the system to produce sounds for other sensors, then you must enable the Global Intrusion Sounds and Sirens feature for the system. This will require accessing programming with the Installer Code (default 1111).


Arm Stay and Arm Instant

Jarrett is excited to explain the difference between Arm Stay Mode and Arm Instant Mode. When you Arm Instant, the system ignores Entry Delay periods. This means that if you fault an Entry/Exit Zone while the system is Armed Instant, then the system will go into immediate alarm, instead of giving you a chance to disarm during the Entry Delay countdown. In Armed Stay, you get the Entry Delay when you fault an Entry/Exit Zone. Both Arm Stay and Arm Instant will automatically bypass interior zone types.


Program SiXSMOKE to Lyric Controller

I show you how to program a Honeywell SiXSMOKE to the Honeywell Lyric Alarm System. The Honeywell SiXSMOKE is an encrypted smoke and heat detector built exclusively for use with the Lyric. The smoke detector portion is photoelectric, which means that there is a small light inside the sensor. Smoke entering the chamber will cause the light to refract, which tells the sensor to report to the system. The heat detector uses both fixed temperature detection and rate-of-rise detection. The sensor has an 85 dB sounder.

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A great way to build out your Honeywell Lyric is with Honeywell 5800 Sensors. These are simple, 345 MHz wireless sensors that you can easily enroll with the system for security, life-safety, and environmental monitoring. They are perfect for expanding your system and making it more robust.

Honeywell lyric controller encrypted wireless security system

When you want to pair a Honeywell 5800 Sensor with the Lyric, the process is very straightforward. Put the Lyric in its auto-enrollment mode by choosing Security > Tools > enter Installer Code (default 4112) > Program > Zones > Add New > Serial Number. Make sure the RF Type on the right-hand side is set to 5800. Then activate the sensor either by faulting it or triggering its cover tamper switch. The Lyric should beep to confirm that it received a signal transmission. Then activate the sensor a second time to have the Lyric display the Serial Number. The third activation will confirm the Serial Number and return you to the screen where you can configure the zone settings.


Programming the zone settings for the sensor is actually quite simple. Depending on how you enrolled the sensor, you may need to adjust the Loop Number. This is almost always the case if you enrolled the sensor by activating its tamper switch. Refer to the instruction manual for the 5800 Sensor to determine which Loop Number to use.

The two (2) Zone Descriptors and the Device Type serve as the name for the sensor. You should choose a name that will help you identify the sensor, e.g. "Front Bedroom Motion Sensor", "South Hallway Door", etc. The Response Type determines how the system responds when the sensor is faulted. See our list of Lyric Response Types for more info.

Alarm Report should be set to Yes if you want the system to report out through AlarmNet to a Central Station if the zone causes an alarm on the system. That is an essential component of alarm monitoring services. Chime is optional, and it has the panel emit any one of several available sounds when the zone is faulted. Supervision tells the panel to look for an RF check-in signal from the sensor periodically to ensure that it is online. Click Save in the bottom-right after you finish adjusting the settings.


Keep in mind that only uni-directional (one-way) sensors from the Honeywell 5800 Series can be used with the Lyric. This leaves out bi-directional devices like the Honeywell 5800WAVE Siren, the Honeywell 5828 Keypad, and the Honeywell 5800RL Relay Module, so make sure you do not buy those for the Lyric. But you still have a lot of excellent sensors and security devices to choose from.

Below is a list of the Honeywell 5800 Sensors that you can use with the Honeywell Lyric:

Sensor Name
Notes
Honeywell 5800MINI
Honeywell 5800mini interior wireless door and window sensor
Door/Window sensor. Uses Loop 1.
Honeywell 5800PIR-RES
Honeywell 5800pir res wireless pet immune motion detector close up
PIR motion sensor. Uses Loop 1.
Coverage Area: 35' x 40'
Honeywell 5816
Honeywell 5816 wireless door window sensor
Door and window sensor.
Loop 1 = Terminal Block for NC Contact
Loop 2 = Reed Switch
Honeywell 5811
Honeywell 5811 wireless wafer thin door and window sensor
Door and window sensor. Uses Loop 1.
Honeywell 5800C2W
Honeywell 5800c2w hardwire to wireless system 9 zone conversion module
9-zone wired to wireless converter. Allows hardwired sensors to communicate with the Lyric as wireless devices. All zones use Loop 1 and a unique Serial Number ID.
Honeywell 5800CO
Honeywell 5800co wireless carbon monoxide detector
Carbon monoxide sensor.
Loop 1 = CO Detection
Loop 2 = End of Sensor Life (separate programming only required on TURBO and other V-Plex panels)
Honeywell 5800COMBO
Honeywell 5800combo smoke heat and co detector
Combination, smoke, heat, CO, and low-temperature sensor. Uses up to five (5) zones on the Lyric Panel. Has two (2) Serial Numbers for enrollment purposes.
Loop 1, SN 1 = Smoke/Heat Detection
Loop 2, SN 1 = Smoke/Heat Maintenance
Loop 3, SN 1 = Low Temperature Detection
Loop 1, SN 2 = CO Detection
Loop 2, SN 2 = End of Sensor Life (separate programming required only on TURBO and other V-Plex panels)
Honeywell 5800FLOOD
Honeywell 5800flood wireless flood and temperature sensor
Flood and temperature sensor.
Loop 1 = Low Temperature Detection
Loop 2 = High Temperature Detection
Loop 3 = Flood Detection
Honeywell 5800MICRA
Honeywell 5800micra wireless recessed window contact
Recessed window sensor. Uses Loop 1.
Honeywell 5800PIR
Honeywell 5800pir exterior of wireless motion detector
PIR motion sensor.
Loop 1 = Low Sensitivity Motion.
Loop 2 = High Sensitivity Motion.
Loop 3 = Low Temperature Detection
Coverage Area: 35' x 40'
Honeywell 5800PIR-COM
Honeywell 5800pir com exterior of wireless long range motion det
Commercial PIR motion sensor.
Loop 1 = Low Sensitivity Motion
Loop 2 = High Sensitivity Motion
Loop 3 = Low Temperature Detection
Coverage Area: 60' x 80'
Honeywell 5800PIR-OD
Honeywell 5800pir od wireless outdoor motion detector exterior
Outdoor PIR motion sensor. Uses Loop 1.
Honeywell 5800PIR-OD2
Outdoor PIR motion sensor. Uses Loop 1.
Honeywell 5800RP
Honeywell 5800rp wireless repeater
Wireless repeater for Honeywell 5800 Sensors. Does not require enrollment, but can be assigned a single zone for RF supervision, low-battery, AC loss, and RF jam detection. This is done using Serial Number 1 with Loop 1, with DIP Switch 2 set in the OFF position. Can also use up to four (4) separate zones for supervision when DIP Switch 2 is set to ON. This is required for UL installations.
Honeywell 5800RPS
Honeywell 5800rps wireless recessed door and window plunger sens
Recessed door/window sensor. Uses Loop 1.
Honeywell 5800SS1
Honeywell 5800ss1 exterior of wireless shock sensor
Shock sensor. Uses Loop 1.
Honeywell 5802MN
Honeywell 5802 wireless panic button
Medical alert button. Uses Loop 1.
Honeywell 5802MN2
Honeywell 5802mn2 wireless dual button medical alert
Medical alert button. Uses Loop 1.
Honeywell 5802WXT
Honeywell 5802wxt wireless panic button
Panic button. Uses Loop 1.
Honeywell 5802WXT-2
Honeywell 5802wxt 2 wireless dual button medical alert
Panic button. Uses Loop 1.
Honeywell 5806W3
Honeywell 5806w3 wireless smoke detector
Smoke detector. Uses Loop 1.
Honeywell 5808W3
Honeywell 5808w3 wireless smoke and heat detector
Smoke and heat detector.
Loop 1 = Smoke & Heat Detection
Loop 3 = Low Temperature Detection
Honeywell 5809
Honeywell 5809 wireless heat detector
Fixed temperature and rate-of-rise heat detector. Uses Loop 1. Alarm occurs when the temperature exceeds 135 degrees Fahrenheit, or when the temperature rises more than 15 degrees Fahrenheit per minute.
Honeywell 5809FXT
Honeywell 5809 wireless heat detector
Fixed temperature heat detector. Uses Loop 1. Alarm occurs when the temperature exceeds 135 degrees Fahrenheit.
Honeywell 5809SS
Honeywell 5809ss wireless fixed temperature slash ror heat detec
Fixed temperature and rate-of-rise heat detector. Uses Loop 1. Alarm occurs at 135 degrees Fahrenheit or when the temperature rises more than 15 degrees Fahrenheit per minute.
Honeywell 5814
Honeywell 5814 wireless small door sensor and window sensor
Door and window sensor. Uses Loop 1.
Honeywell 5815
Honeywell 5815 white wireless aesthetic door sensor and window s
Door and window sensor.
Loop 1 = Terminal Block for NC Contact
Loop 2 = Reed Switch
Honeywell 5816MN
Honeywell 5816mn wireless mini door sensor and window sensor
Door and window sensor.
Loop 1 = Terminal Block for NC Contact
Loop 2 = Reed Switches
Honeywell 5816OD
Honeywell 5816od wireless outdoor door and window sensor top
Outdoor door and window sensor.
Loop 1 = Terminal Block for NC Contact
Loop 2 = Reed Switch
Honeywell 5817
Honeywell 5817 wireless three zone sensor
Three (3) zone door and window sensor & transmitter.
Loop 1 = NC or NO (DIP Switch Selectable) unsupervised. It does not use an End of Line Resistor (EOLR)
Loop 2, 3 = NC Only. Both are unsupervised with no EOLR used
Honeywell 5817CBXT
Honeywell 5817cb wireless commercial sensor
Three (3) zone commercial transmitter.
Loop 1 = Two (2) Terminals; Primary Loop supervised by 470k Ohm (yellow, purple, yellow, gold) EOLR. Resistor must ALWAYS be installed, even if Loop 1 is not programmed. If Loop 1 is used as a burglary zone, then Loop 4 must be programmed as a separate zone for Cover Tamper protection.
Loop 2 = NC Reed Switch
Loop 3 = Two (2) Terminals; NC Loop unsupervised, no EOLR required
Honeywell 5817XT
Honeywell 5817xt three zone universal transmitter
Three (3) zone door and window sensor & transmitter.
Loop 1 = NC or NO (DIP Switch Selectable) unsupervised with no EOLR required
Loop 2, 3 = Two (2) Terminal Blocks, NC Only
Honeywell 5818MNL
Honeywell 5818mnl wireless recessed door sensor and window senso
Recessed door and window sensor. Uses Loop 1. Not suitable for use in metal doors
Honeywell 5819
Honeywell 5819 wireless shock processor and sensor
Three (3) zone shock processor.
Loop 1 = NC for Inertia Style External Shock Sensor. This input provides a suitable fast loop response of from 1ms to 20ms, based on dip switch setting
Loop 2 = Reed Switch
Loop 3 = NC for Wired Contact, unsupervised with no EOLR required
Honeywell 5819S
Honeywell 5819s wireless shock sensor and transmitter
Shock sensor and contact sensor.
Loop 1 = Built-in Inertia Style Shock Sensor
Loop 2 = Reed Switch
Loop 3 = NC for Wired Contact
Honeywell 5819WHS
Honeywell 5819whs wireless transmitter with integrated shock sen
Three (3) zone shock processor.
Loop 1 = NC, Built-in Inertia Style Shock Sensor
Loop 2 = Reed Switch
Loop 3 = NC for Wired Contact
Honeywell 5820L
Honeywell 5820l super slim wireless door and window sensor
Slimline door and window sensor. Uses Loop 1.
Honeywell 5822T
Honeywell 5822t wireless garage tilt sensor
Garage tilt sensor.
Loop 1 = NC for Wired Contact, unsupervised, no EOLR used
Loop 3 = Tilt Switch
Honeywell 5834-2
Honeywell 5834 2 wireless 2 button security key fob
Two (2) button key fob. Dual-button inputs allowed. Uses three (3) loops total, for a possible three (3) inputs. Can only be used with the Lyric in Low-Security Mode (Green LED)
Honeywell 5834-4
Honeywell 5834 4 wireless 4 button security key fob for honeywell security systems
Four (4) button key fob. Dual-button inputs allowed. Uses two (2) Serial Numbers, which both use Loops 1, 2, 3, 4. Up to eight (8) inputs possible. Can only be used with the Lyric in Low-Security Mode (Green LED)
Honeywell 5834-4EN
Honeywell 5834 4en wireless enhanced 4 button security key fob
Four (4) button key fob. Dual-button inputs allowed. Uses two (2) Serial Numbers, which both use Loops 1, 2, 3, 4. Up to eight (8) inputs possible. Can only be used with the Lyric in Low-Security Mode (Green LED)
Honeywell 5853
Honeywell 5853 wireless glass break detector exterior
Glass break sensor. Uses Loop 1.
Honeywell 5869
Honeywell 5869 wireless commercial panic switch
Commercial panic switch. Uses Loop 1. Latches when tripped, key (provided) needed to reset it after it is tripped
Honeywell 5878
Honeywell 5878 wireless remote alarm keypad
Six (6) button key fob. Uses two (2) Serial Numbers, which both use Loops 1, 2, 3, 4. Up to eight (8) inputs possible.
Honeywell 5898
Honeywell 5898 wireless dual tec motion detector
Dual-tec motion sensor.
Loop 1 = Low Sensitivity Motion Sensor. Pet immunity is available for this loop. 50lb or 100lb pet immunity, selectable via DIP Switch 1
Loop 2 = High Sensitivity Motion Sensor.
Loop 3 = Temperature Sensor (High or Low, DIP Switch Selectable)
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