DIY Security Systems Posts

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Alarm Grid is back with another video recap! This time, we have six (6) new videos to share. We spent a lot of time this week focusing on the 2GIG GC3e, but we also covered some other security equipment as well. We hope you enjoy this latest batch of videos. Let's check them out!

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Properly Opening Up a 2GIG GC3e

I show you how to open up the 2GIG GC3e Security Panel. Before opening the system, you must loosen the set screw at the bottom. If the panel is wall-mounted, you can press the panel against the wall and lift upward. Otherwise, lay the panel face-down, and pop off the back plate using your finger or a screwdriver. Opening up the GC3e Panel is often done to access the system's terminal block and backup battery.


Powering On the 2GIG GC3e

I show you how to power on the 2GIG GC3e Alarm System. The system uses a 14VDC, 1.7A transformer for primary power. If primary power is lost, then a backup battery will keep the system running. When powering on the 2GIG GC3e, we recommend connecting the backup battery first, followed by the transformer. Alarm wiring is not included with the 2GIG GC3e, so you must supply your own. We recommend using a Honeywell LT-Cable for this purpose.


Deleting a Defective Z-Wave Device from the GC3 or GC3e

I show you how to delete a defective Z-Wave device from a 2GIG GC3 or 2GIG GC3e. Some reasons why a Z-Wave device might be displayed as failed include the device being powered down or out of wireless range. Deleting a defective Z-Wave device is usually a good option if the device is lost or destroyed so that a traditional exclusion process cannot be performed. Any failed Z-Wave device will have an error icon next to it in the Smart Home Devices Menu.


Setting Up a Cellular Communicator for a 2GIG GC3e

I show you how to add a cellular communicator to a 2GIG GC3e Security System. Doing this will allow you to activate the 2GIG GC3e System for monitoring service. And if the monitoring plan includes access to Alarm.com, then you will also be able to control the system remotely through that platform. The 2GIG GC3e has a side slot for you to easily install a cellular radio. Remember to power down the system completely before installing the cellular communicator.


Powering the TG-1 Express Using the On-Board Terminals

I show you how you can power the Telguard TG-1 Express using its on-board power terminals. The Telguard TG-1 Express is used to take over the phone dialer for a panel so that it can communicate across a cellular network. Normally, the TG-1 uses a single RJ31X connection for power and communication with the panel. But if the existing power wires from the RJ31X cable are cut, then you can instead make the auxiliary power connections at the TG-1 on-board terminals.


Properly Closing the Qolsys IQ Panel 2

I show you how to properly close the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Security System. To properly close the system, you want to align the top tabs first. Then you should lock the bottom two (2) tabs into place. Lastly, make sure the top four (4) tabs remain closed, and click them into place if they are not. The panel will make a strange noise every half-hour if it is not closed properly. The main reason to open the IQ2 is to replace its backup battery every few years.

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It's time for another video recap! There are eight (8) new videos this week, all featuring yours truly. We spent a lot of time working on the 2GIG GC2e again. We also covered the process for backdooring the Honeywell LYNX Touch Panels, and we touched on the IQ2+. Let's check out the videos!

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Pairing a Z-Wave Device with the 2GIG GC2e

I show you how to pair a Z-Wave device with a 2GIG GC2e Security System. The 2GIG GC2e serves as a Z-Wave Plus controller, which allows you to pair smart home automation devices with the system. Devices can be controlled locally at the panel, as well as remotely from Alarm.com if the system is monitored. There are many types of Z-Wave devices you can use with the GC2e, including lights, door locks, smart thermostats, and more!


Programming a Wireless Zone On a 2GIG GC2e

I show you how to program a wireless zone for a 2GIG GC2e Alarm System. Every sensor used with the 2GIG GC2e will take up at least one zone. The GC2e System has sixty (60) wireless zones available. You can pair sensors from the Honeywell 5800 Series, the 2GIG 345 MHz Series, and the 2GIG eSeries Lineup. We recommend auto-enrolling any new sensor to prevent entering an incorrect Serial Number. Auto-enrolling will also confirm successful communication.


Programming a Key Fob for a 2GIG GC2e

I show you how to program a key fob for a 2GIG GC2e Alarm Panel. A key fob is a small, handheld device that you can use to arm and disarm your system. You can very easily carry around a key fob in your pocket or purse, and they are great for putting on key rings. Popular key fob options for the 2GIG GC2e System include the 2GIG KEY2-345, the 2GIG KEY2e-345, and the Honeywell 5834-4.


Adding & Changing User Codes On a 2GIG GC2e

I show you how to add and change user codes on a 2GIG GC3 Security Panel. The GC2e has (64) user code slots available. You need a valid user code to successfully disarm the system. It is recommended that everyone who uses the system regularly has their own user code so that you can keep track of who uses the system. You can also apply a schedule to a code so that it only works at certain times.


Using the Backdoor to Enter Programming On a Honeywell L5200 or L5210

I show you how to use the backdoor method on a Honeywell L5200 or L5210. The backdoor method involves rebooting the panel and then performing a special sequence of commands as the system reloads. By completing this process, you can get into programming if you were previously locked out. Please note that the backdooring process will not work if the system is currently in an armed state. You will need to disarm the system before you can backdoor.


Getting Back Into Programming On an L7000 If You're Locked Out

I show you how to get into programming on a Honeywell L7000 if you're locked out by using the backdoor method. There are two (2) main reasons why you would become locked out of programming. The first is that the option "NO" was selected at the prompt asking if the installer should be allowed to re-enter programming. Always choose "YES" when exiting programming. The other possibility is that you do not know the Installer Code for the system. Do not change the Installer Code from its default of 4112 to avoid being locked out.


Secure Arming On the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus

I demonstrate the Secure Arming feature on the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus. When Secure Arming is enabled, you must enter a valid user code or the Master Code when arming the system. Normally, the system can be armed without providing a code. Additionally, you must also provide a code if you go to cancel an arming session during the Exit Delay countdown if this feature is enabled. Many parents with small children enable the feature to prevent the system from being armed accidentally.


IQ Panel 2 Exit Delay Increased After Opening Door

I explain why the Exit Delay timer on the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus will automatically increase after opening a door. This is due to a false alarm prevention feature called Auto Exit Time Extension. This feature is activated if two (2) Entry/Exit faults are detected during the Exit Delay countdown. When you fault the first E/E Zone after arming, the system assumes that you have left the building. Then when another E/E fault is detected, the system assumes that you have returned. It then gives you an added 60 seconds to exit the building. If you quickly re-entered the premises because you forgot something, this prevents you from having to disarm and then re-arm the system.

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We're here with another video recap! There are eight (8) new videos for you to check out this week. Once again, I took the role of appearing in all the videos. We hope to have some familiar faces returning soon! But for now, let's take a look at what our video team has been up to.

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Deleting a Wireless Zone from a Simon XT

I show you how to delete a wireless zone from a Simon XT Security System. The Simon XT uses 319.5 MHz wireless sensors, and it has forty (40) zone slots available. By accessing the Sensors Menu of Programming, you can delete any wireless zone that has been set up with the system. You can then enroll a new sensor in that open zone slot if needed. Keep in mind that the zone must be rebuilt from scratch if you decide to re-add the sensor back to the system.


Deleting a Wireless Zone from a Simon XTi or Simon XTi-5

I show you how to delete a wireless zone from a Simon XTi or Simon XTi-5. The Simon XTi and Simon XTi-5 are essentially the same as the Simon XT, except for the fact that these two panels have built-in touchscreen keypad. Both the Simon XTi and Simon XTi-5 have forty (40) available wireless zones, and they both use 319.5 MHz wireless sensors. If you delete a zone from the Simon XTi or Simon XTi-5, then you can reuse the zone with a new sensor.


Disabling Exit Sounds on a Qolsys IQ Panel 2 or IQ Panel 2 Plus

I show you how to disable Exit Delay sounds on the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus. The IQ2 makes Exit Delay sounds for false alarm prevention. The idea is that if you accidentally Arm Away the system, then the Exit Delay sounds will alert you to the situation so that you know to either leave the building or cancel the arming session. But if you find Exit Delay sounds to be bothersome or annoying, there are a couple of different options for muting these sounds.


Cover Tamper Causes the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 to Make Strange Noises

I explain why the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 will make an usual noise every thirty (30) minutes. The reason why this happens is because the panel is not positioned on its back mounting plate properly. It can be a bit tricky to get the panel on the back plate properly, but once you do, the sound should stop occurring. If you absolutely cannot get the panel positioned on the back plate, then you do have the option of disabling tamper cover notifications in programming.


Manually Extending the Exit Delay Time On IQ2

I show you how to manually extend the Exit Delay countdown time on the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 for a single arming session. When you Arm Away on the IQ2, the Exit Delay timer will go into effect. You must then leave the building or cancel the arming session within the exit delay time limit. If you press the green +60 button, then the Exit Delay will be extended by sixty (60) seconds. You can only do this once per arming session. Pressing the button again will do nothing.


Permanently Extending the Exit Delay Time On IQ2

I show you how to permanently extend the Exit Delay countdown time on the Qolsys IQ Panel 2. By permanently extending the Exit Delay, you will have a longer amount of time to vacate the building every time you Arm. The system will use either the Normal Exit Delay setting or the Long Exit Delay setting depending on what zones you have programmed with the system. If you have at least one zone with Sensor Group 12 - Entry/Exit Long Delay, then the system will use the Long Exit Delay setting.


Installing a Honeywell 7847i on a VISTA P-Series Alarm Panel

I show you how to install a Honeywell 7847i on a VISTA P-Series Security System. The Honeywell 7847i is an IP communicator that allows a compatible panel to connect with the Resideo AlarmNet Servers for monitoring service. If you want to use Total Connect 2.0 with your system, then you must be running Firmware Version 9.12 or higher on a VISTA-15P or VISTA-20P. You can determine the firmware by checking the PROM Chip. No version of the VISTA-10P will work with Total Connect 2.0.


Installing a Honeywell 7847i On a VISTA TURBO Panel

I show you how to install a Honeywell 7847i on a Honeywell VISTA TURBO Panel, such as a Honeywell VISTA-128BPT or a Honeywell VISTA-250BPT. The most common reason why someone will choose to use an IP-only communicator is because they want monitoring costs to be as low as possible. IP monitoring is less expensive than cellular monitoring because no cellular service fees are incurred. But keep in mind that an internet outage will take your panel offline if you rely strictly on IP communication for your system.

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It's Monday again, and it's time for another Alarm Grid video recap! We have six (6) new videos for you. Five (5) feature the DSC PowerSeries NEO, while the last one covers the Honeywell LTE-IA and LTE-IV Communicators for VISTA Systems. All videos feature yours truly. Let's check them out!

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Adding a DSC HS2TCHP Touchscreen Keypad to a DSC PowerSeries NEO

I show you how to add a DSC HS2TCHP Touchscreen Keypad to a DSC PowerSeries NEO Security System. Adding a touchscreen keypad like the DSC HS2TCHP to a system can be more inviting and easier for end users to understand than a traditional numeric keypad. The DSC HS2TCHP connects with the same on-board panel terminals as any other keypad for the system. Remember to power down your NEO Panel completely before adding a keypad or making any other hardware changes.


Adding Hardwired Zone to DSC PowerSeries NEO Security System

I show you how to add a wired sensor to a DSC PowerSeries NEO Security System. As a hardwired alarm panel, the DSC PowerSeries NEO can used wired sensors with no extra add-ons being required. All wired zones on the NEO will use end of line 5.6k ohm resistors, which are color coded green-blue-red-gold. This includes wired zones that are not actively being used with the system. New wired sensors will be connected with the panel, and the appropriate Zone Definition will be set at the corresponding zone.


Program a Wireless Zone to a DSC PowerSeries NEO

I show you how to add a wireless sensor to a DSC PowerSeries NEO Security System. The NEO cannot support wireless sensors right out of the box. Instead, a wireless transceiver must be added to the system. The NEO supports PowerG Transceivers that will allow you to use PowerG Wireless Sensors with the system. The advantage to using wireless sensors is that they are much easier to install than wired sensors. This is because you will not need to run wires for wireless sensors.


Enrolling a PowerG Sensor to a DSC PowerSeries NEO

I show you how to add a PowerG Sensor to a DSC PowerSeries NEO Security System. This will require that a PowerG Transceiver is added to the system, such as a DSC HS2LCDRF9 N Keypad or a DSC HSMHOST9 Standalone Transceiver. PowerG Sensors are widely seen as some of the best wireless sensors in the security industry. This is because these sensors offer a wireless signal range of up to 2km in an open air environment, and they utilize military grade 128-bit AES encryption for exceptional security.


Delete a Zone From a DSC PowerSeries NEO

I show you how to delete a zone from a DSC PowerSeries NEO. This process differs depending on whether the zone is wireless or hardwired. For a wireless zone, you are clearing the sensor from the system so that it is no longer recognized. For a wired zone, you are merely changing the Zone Definition for the associated wired zone to [000] for Null Zone. Deleting a zone from a DSC PowerSeries NEO will open up the zone so that it can be used with a different sensor.


Installing a Honeywell LTE-IA or LTE-IV Communicator to a VISTA-21iP System

I show you how to add a Honeywell LTE-IA or a Honeywell LTE-IV to a Honeywell VISTA-21iP Security System. The LTE-IA and the LTE-IV are dual-path communicators that use both IP connectivity (wired ethernet) and LTE cellular connectivity. When adding one of these communicators to a VISTA-21iP, you must first disable the internal IP communicator for the system. This is done by re-positioning the white jumper to the bottom two (2) prongs. Make sure to power down the panel before re-positioning the jumper and installing the communicator!

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We have heard reports lately of RF supervision troubles on 2GIG GC2e and 2GIG GC3e Systems, particularly for zones set up with encrypted 2GIG eSeries Sensors. Upon further testing, we have learned that eSeries Zones configured with incorrect Equipment Codes can cause supervision trouble.

2gig pir1e wireless encrypted pir motion detector

Equipment Codes are somewhat of a unique quirk for 2GIG Security Systems. This numeric code identifies the model number of the wireless sensor that is being used. It should not be confused with the sensor's Serial Number, which is unique for each individual sensor. You set the Equipment Code when programming a new zone. Alarm Grid has helpful guides available for programming a GC2e zone and programming a GC3e zone.

The following table contains the current list of eSeries Equipment Codes:

Product Name Equipment Code
2GIG eSeries Smoke Detector (USA) 2058
2GIG eSeries CO Detector (USA) 2860
2GIG eSeries Tilt Sensor 2061
2GIG eSeries Flood Sensor 2065
2GIG eSeries Shock Sensor 2066
2GIG eSeries Repeater 2067
2GIG eSeries Translator 2068
2GIG eSeries Water Sensor 2070
2GIG eSeries Thin Door/Window Contact 2862
2GIG eSeries Recessed Door Contact 2863
2GIG eSeries Glass Break Detector 2864
2GIG eSeries Pet-Immune PIR Motion Sensor 2869
2GIG eSeries Takeover Module 2873
2GIG eSeries 4-Button Keyfob Remote 2866

Before the rise of 2GIG eSeries Encrypted Sensors, the Equipment Code setting on a 2GIG System was largely seen as a formality. The general practice was to find the corresponding sensor if available, but generally not worry about it very much if you couldn't match it exactly. Some third-party sensors do not have their own Equipment Codes, and an "equivalent" is usually selected instead. For example, the Honeywell 5800MINI and the VERSA-2GIG can both just use the Equipment Code for "Existing Door/Window Contact", rather than finding an exact match.

But for the 2GIG eSeries Sensors, the Equipment Code selection is actually very important. Failing to set the exact corresponding equipment code can result in the system displaying an RF supervision loss trouble condition for the associated zone. This trouble is typically used to identify that the system has lost communication with the sensor, due to either the sensor powering down from a dead or missing battery, or the sensor being taken out of wireless range. But it seems that the GC2e and GC3e cannot properly supervise a 2GIG eSeries Sensor with an improper Equipment Code. More information can be found in this FAQ.

Missing Equipment Codes are more common for third-party sensors not produced by 2GIG. For a 2GIG Sensor, you should almost always have a direct Equipment Code selection available. And the 2GIG eSeries Sensors are still quite new, so 2GIG made sure to put in Equipment Codes specifically for each of these sensors. However, you may be unable to find an Equipment Code for a brand-new eSeries Sensor if your 2GIG System isn't on the latest firmware version. Adding support for new sensors is a major part of most 2GIG Firmware Updates. You can view our GC2e Firmware Page here, and our GC3e Firmware Page here.

If you need any help programming a GC2e or GC3e wireless zone, then make sure to check out the programming FAQs we linked earlier. Alarm Grid monitored customers can also receive additional free support by emailing support@alarmgrid.com. This is also a great email to use if you are interested in signing up for new monitoring service. We check our email from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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It's Monday again, and this is normally when we would be present you with a video recap. But since we're still working on getting our entire video team together, we figured this was a good time to catch up on some videos we missed in previous recaps, as well as present some classic videos.


How Do I Clear a Latched Alarm Using a Tuxedo Touch Keypad?

I show you how to clear a latched alarm on a Honeywell Tuxedo Touch Keypad. This is done by performing a typical disarm and then clearing the faulted zone. The reason why alarms become latched or stuck is because of the alarm memory feature on the Honeywell VISTA Systems. The panel wants to be sure that you are aware that an alarm previously occurred, so it makes you clear the faulted zone, even after disarming at the keypad.


Programming a Zone to a 2GIG GC3e

I show you how to program a wireless sensor to a 2GIG GC3e Security System. This is a very important step when setting up a security system. Every sensor used with the system will require at least one zone on the system. When you program the zone, you will set various options and configurations that will determine how the system responds when the associated sensor is faulted. You will also enroll the Serial Number with the GC3e so that the panel can recognize the sensor.


Honeywell 5808W3: Program Low-Temp to Lyric

Alarm Grid Co-Founder Sterling shows you how to program the low-temperature detection function for a Honeywell 5808W3 Smoke Detector to a Honeywell Lyric Alarm System. The Honeywell 5808W3 is a smoke and heat detector that also offers low-temperature detection, which is commonly referred to as freeze detection. The 5808W3 uses Loop Number 3 for low-temperature detection, and it activates a temperatures below 41°F. This is good for letting the user know before the pipes potentially freeze.


Lyric Security System: Change Master Code

Sterling shows you how to change the Master Code on a Honeywell Lyric Security System. The Master Code is used primarily for arming and disarming the system and accessing the Master Tools Menu. It can be used to adjust or change a limited selection of system settings. However, changing most advanced settings and making zone changes will require the Installer Code. We strongly recommend changing the Master Code from its default of 1234 for security purposes. But we advise leaving the Installer Code at its default of 4112.

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If you have a home or business in Canada, and you are looking to receive central station monitoring service, then Alarm Grid is happy to help! Our company is proud to provide service through Rapid Response Monitoring Services (RRMS). We offer many system options for users in Canada.


Rapid Response has been protecting US and Canadian homes and businesses since 1992. The company consists of more than 550 highly trained experts who are dedicated to providing top-quality monitoring service for end users. Alarm Grid has hand-picked RRMS for the protection of our customers in Canada due to their proven success, expertise, and overall reliability.

There are currently two (2) central station locations operated by RRMS. These monitoring centers are located in Southern California (Rapid West in Corona, CA) and New York State (Rapid East in Syracuse, NY). Both monitoring centers are state-of-the-art, and they operate 24/7 for the protection of end users. We are highly confident in their ability to provide outstanding service at all times.

When an alarm or other important system condition is received by RRMS, a trained expert will immediately take action based on what is listed for the end user's monitoring account. This can include requesting immediate emergency dispatch, contacting the end user to make sure that everything is alright, or following other predetermined instructions. RRMS takes special precautions to prevent delays and ensure that help is sent out as soon as possible.

Having two (2) independent monitoring centers provides added redundancy for end users receiving central station service through RRMS. If one monitoring center goes offline for any reason, all incoming signals will be re-routed to the other monitoring center to ensure that end users receive the help that they need. This aspect was essential in Alarm Grid choosing to work with RRMS.

Although the RRMS monitoring centers are located in the United States, they will have no trouble reaching out to jurisdictions throughout Canada and providing necessary assistance. Remember, the exact location of a monitoring center is not very important. What is important is that the monitoring center is able to reliably receive incoming signals and take appropriate action when emergencies occur. And RRMS has that aspect nailed.

It is important to remember that Alarm Grid customers who receive central station monitoring service in the United States will continue to receive service through Criticom Monitoring Services (CMS). We are extremely confident in both our primary monitoring partners CMS for customers within the United States, and RRMS for customers in Canada. To learn more about CMS, we recommend checking out this helpful FAQ.

Of course, a good monitoring station is only one step in the process. You also need a capable security system that can reliably send out signals. And Alarm Grid has that aspect down as well. The options for users in Canada are slightly different than those for users in the United States. We'll cover some of the most popular options below, but we recommend checking this blog post for more complete info on what we can offer for users in Canada.

The ultimate option for Alarm Grid Monitoring Service in Canada is arguably the AT&T LTE Version of the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus. The reason why this system works so well is because its built-in AT&T LTE Communicator will roam to the Rogers LTE Network in Canada with no extra charges. And since it also has built-in WIFI, you will get dual-path connectivity right out of the box. Just remember that your will need a monitoring plan that includes cellular service.

Qolsys iq panel 2 verizon 7 security panel w slash z wave ready

If you are looking to save money with internet-only monitoring, then the Honeywell Lyric is a great option. Unlike the Alarm.com Panels, the Lyric System can connect with the Resideo AlarmNet360 Servers through exclusively internet protocol (IP), without having a cellular communication path set up. This can save you money, as IP-only plans are typically less expensive than cellular plans. But remember, an internet outage will leave you unmonitored!

Honeywell lyric controller encrypted wireless security system

Also keep in mind that it is possible to receive alarm monitoring without service through a central station. This is called self-monitoring, and it involves having the end user receive text and/or email alerts when system activity occurs. Using this option it is solely up to the end user to request their own help in an emergency situation. Alarm Grid offers various self-monitoring plans if you do not want to receive central station service through Rapid Response.

If you have any questions about Rapid Response, or if you want to learn more about security panels or alarm monitoring service in general, please reach out to us! The best way to contact our team is to email us at support@alarmgrid.com. We check our email during our usual business hours of 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

Note: If you receive central station service through Rapid Response, make sure to save the phone number (800) 932-3822 in your phone. This the phone number that RRMS will use to call you in the event of an emergency. It is very important that you know that this number is not a telemarketer!

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Alarm Grid has a short but sweet video recap for you! Last week's recap was skipped to spread the cheer about our headquarters reopening, but we're here now! Unfortunately, we only have three (3) videos to share. Also, our usual team wasn't quite ready yet, so I had to make more appearances.

2gig gc3e wireless encrypted alarm panelThis week's videos are centered around the 2GIG GC3e Security System. This is a wireless all-in-one panel with support for encrypted 2GIG eSeries Sensors, as well as non-encrypted 345 MHz sensors. The system has a beautiful 7-inch touchscreen, built-in WIFI, partitioning support, and an integrated Z-Wave Plus controller. We hope these videos help you feel more comfortable in setting up your own 2GIG GC3e System for your home or business!

Pairing a Z-Wave Device to the 2GIG GC3e

I show you how to pair a Z-Wave device with the 2GIG GC3e. The GC3e has a built-in Z-Wave Plus controller, which allows you to pair Z-Wave Plus and classic Z-Wave devices with the system. Common Z-Wave devices include lights, door locks, thermostats, and more. Programmed Z-Wave devices can be controlled from the panel and remotely from Alarm.com if the system is monitored. Most Z-Wave devices are excluded, or cleared, from the network before being added.


Programming a Key Fob Into a 2GIG GC3e

I show you how to add a key fob to a 2GIG GC3e. A key fob is a small handheld device that you can use to control your security system from a distance. Most key fobs will allow you to conveniently arm and disarm your system and operate programmed relay-triggered devices. Many key fobs also have the ability to set off panic alarms in distress situations. The 2GIG GC3e supports various 345 MHz wireless key fobs.


Adding or Changing User Codes on a 2GIG GC3e

I show you how to add, change, and delete user codes on a 2GIG GC3e. A user code is a sequence of numbers that you enter into a system to verify that you are an authorized user. The 2GIG GC3e supports up to 100 user codes. It is advised that each regular user has their own code. Each new code on the GC3e must be enabled for the use with system after it has been added.

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Alarm Grid has been releasing some useful new FAQs and guides on using and setting up the 2GIG GC2e and 2GIG GC3e Security Systems. We wanted to let you know about this content so that you can start getting the most out of these panels. Both can make a great addition to a home or business!

2gig gc3e wireless encrypted alarm panel

2gig gc2e wireless encrypted alarm panel

Both the 2GIG GC2e and 2GIG GC3e support the Alarm.com interactive service platform. By activating the system on a compatible monitoring plan, you will be able to control your 2GIG Panel remotely through the Alarm.com website and mobile app. This is great for operating your system while you are on the go! You will need a compatible LTE cellular communicator for the system to activate it for monitoring service!

Another exciting feature is that both systems offer built-in Z-Wave Plus functionality, which allows you to build a robust and powerful smart automation network for automatic operation and control for various devices used around your home or business. You can also integrate the exclusive lineup of encrypted 2GIG eSeries Sensors with these systems for enhanced wireless security and protection.

The 2GIG GC3e is a bit more robust than the GC2e, as the GC3e offers additional features like built-in WIFI, Smart Area Partitioning, and a larger touchscreen. You also have the ability to set up more wireless zones on the GC3e, which can come in handy for a larger home or business. But really, both systems can adapt well to nearly any situation.

Here we have some recent FAQs we have written for the 2GIG GC2e:

And here are some on the 2GIG GC3e:

If you want to learn more about the 2GIG GC2e or 2GIG GC3e, or if you have questions about alarm monitoring in general, please email us at support@alrmgrid.com. Our team would love to help you out so that you can make an informed buying decision. We check our email from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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Alarm Grid is now offering bundled versions of the Honeywell Lyric Alarm System that include the panel and a compatible LTE cellular communicator. The LYRICUPGRADE-A will have the LYRICLTE-A AT&T LTE Communicator, and theLYRICUPGRADE-V will feature the LYRICLTE-V Verizon LTE Communicator.

Honeywell lyric controller encrypted wireless security system

If you hang around our website regularly, then you probably already know that Lyric System Kits are nothing new for us. But these are fairly unique in that they offer just the system and communicator, without any new sensors. You might want to get one of these kits if you are upgrading from an older LYNX Touch System that can't receive a firmware update, such as a Honeywell L5100 System. The Lyric can support the vast majority of the Honeywell 5800 Sensors used with the older LYNX Touch Systems.

The reason why we decided to release these new Lyric Upgrade Kits is due to the 3G sunset that will be happening in 2022. Older cellular networks are being shut down, and many users are scrambling to find LTE options for their systems. With one of these new kits, you will be getting a Lyric System that is dual-path ready with both WIFI and LTE cellular connectivity. This is the best way to ensure that your panel stays reliably monitored, keeping any potential downtime to an absolute minimum.

The Lyric System offers some great features, such as a 7-inch touchscreen display, support for encrypted Honeywell SiX Series Sensors, connectivity with Total Connect 2.0, the ability to interface with Apple HomeKit, built-in Z-Wave functionality, a 2MP camera for taking disarm photos, and so much more. It truly is a state-of-the-art security system, and it can make a great addition to your home or business.

If you are interested in learning more about the Honeywell LYRICUPGRADE-A or Honeywell LYRICUPGRADE-V, or if you want to know more about monitoring service in general, please email us at support@alarmgrid.com. We check new email from 9am to 8pm M-F, and we always do our best to respond as quickly as possible. We look forward to hearing from you!

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