Home Security Blog

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It's time for our weekly video recap, this time covering releases from Monday and Tuesday of last week. We only have four (4) new videos for now, but we promise there are many more on the way. This week's releases all feature myself, and they cover the Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS. Let's begin!

Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS: Add a Z-Wave Device

I show you how to add a Z-Wave device to a Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS. The PROA7PLUS has a built-in module called the PROWIFIZW that provides the system with both WIFI and Z-Wave control. Paired Z-Wave devices can be controlled from the panel, and remotely from Total Connect 2.0 if the system is monitored with a plan that includes automation services. You can also use TC2 to create smart scenes for your Z-Wave devices so that they activate automatically based on a schedule or with system events.

Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS: Remove a Z-Wave Device

I show you how to remove a Z-Wave device from a Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS. Removing a device clears out its Z-Wave network data so that it can be paired with a new network. That is why you typically remove, or clear, a Z-Wave device before you attempt the pairing process when adding it to the network. This is done even if a Z-Wave device is brand-new, as many Z-Wave devices have residual network data leftover from factory testing.


Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS: Adding a Z-Wave Lock

I show you how to pair a Z-Wave door lock with a Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS. Like all other Z-Wave devices, a Z-Wave lock is paired with the PROA7PLUS by putting the system into its Z-Wave pairing mode and then activating the inclusion/exclusion function on the lock. For best results, it is advised that you clear the lock from the network before attempting to pair it. Most Z-Wave locks have a button that is used for inclusion/exclusion, or they require you to enter in a specific pairing command code using a push-button or touchscreen keypad.

Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS: Resolve WIFI Connection Issues

I explain some of the reasons why a Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS may be experiencing WIFI connection issues. One reason is that the password for the WIFI network may have been entered incorrectly. Another reason is that you are using a Ubiquiti Access Point (AP) with the PROA7PLUS, and you have the Auto-Optimize feature turned ON for the Ubiquiti device. Lastly, there could be something wrong with the PROWIFIZW module inside the PROA7PLUS, and it may need to be replaced.

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Qolsys recently released a service bulletin describing an issue with certain IQ Hardwire 16-F units. This issue affects both the small enclosure and large enclosure versions. Under certain circumstances, affected units can signal a false tamper/tamper restore message for connected zones.

Qolsys TSB #210708, which was released on July 8, 2021, describes this issue, and the corrective action Qolsys is taking to remedy the problem. They do not provide a lot of information regarding what "conditions" bring about this behavior. We have asked for more detail, and if more information is forthcoming, we will provide updates here in our blog.

Rest assured that only a certain number of these devices are affected, and we will provide users with the necessary information to determine if they have one of these units. Qolsys IQ Hardwire 16-F units that were manufactured outside of the window in question are not affected and should not exhibit this behavior.

How to determine if your Qolsys IQ Hardwire 16-F small enclosure (SKU: QS7133-840) is affected:

On the unit itself, or on the box that the unit came in, check the Revision Sticker. This will appear as a bar code on the sticker and will be marked with SN: and DL: If the 4th character of the SN, moving from left to right, is a "C" then the Qolsys IQ Hardwire 16-F small enclosure should be returned/replaced.

How to determine if your Qolsys IQ Hardwire 16-F large enclosure (SKU: QS7134-840) is affected:

On the Qolsys IQ Hardwire 16-F large enclosure, the way you determine the revision is the same, but the revision information is different. On these units the revision to be on the lookout for is "B" rather than "C". This sticker should also appear on the unit itself as well as on the box that the unit comes in. Since these devices come from the factory with an enclosure, the sticker may be on the enclosure rather than the printed circuit board. When reading the sticker, the 4th character when viewing the SN from left to right is "B" on affected units. See the example below:

Qolsys has pulled back available affected stock to correct this issue. Units that may have been affected, but have since been pulled back into manufacturing and reworked or replaced, will sport a sticker that says "TEST OK".


If you purchase a Qolsys IQ Hardwire 16-F that falls within the Revision range discussed above, but the item has a "TEST OK" sticker affixed somewhere on the packaging or the unit itself, then you do not have to worry about this issue. If you purchased a Qolsys IQ Hardwire 16-F prior to the date that this notice was released, and your device falls within the revision range discussed above, then you should contact your distributor to discuss replacing the unit. Per Qolsys, you should do this even if you haven't observed the behavior described in this Technical Service Bulletin.

If you are an Alarm Grid customer, and you purchased an affected unit from Alarm Grid, you can contact us at support@alarmgrid.com. We are here Monday - Friday from 9am to 8pm ET. If you prefer to speak to us by phone, you can reach us at 888-818-7728. It is our pleasure to assist you with any and all of your alarm needs. Stay safe!

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We have learned from Alarm.com that some new features will soon be made available for the Alarm.com ADC-SWM150 Smart Water Valve and Meter. The new device features will be accessible on the latest version of the Alarm.com Mobile App for Android and iOS, Alarm.com Mobile App Version 4.19.2.


According to Alarm.com, iOS users "can select specific days to view their water usage and scroll back in the history to see how their usage has changed over time." The Alarm.com Mobile App will allow them to select specific days within the past thirty (30) days and view their water usage for the selected day(s). Users will also be able to review their usage history across the past 30 days. This is great for monitoring your water usage to make sure that you aren't being wasteful or letting your water conservation practices slip.

As for Android users, the new features seem to be a bit more limited, but the Android version of the app will still allow you to access an all-new "water usage graph" to check water usage across the last seven (7) days. All water-related activity will be found within the Alarm.com Mobile App Water Card, which is easily accessible from your Android or iOS device.

Keep in mind that the new Alarm.com ADC-SWM150 features may not be available just yet. They are being included with Alarm.com Mobile App Version 4.19.2. According to Alarm.com, the new ADC-SWM150 updates will be made available "in the coming weeks", so just keep your eyes open for these updates, and look forward to them coming soon! We know it's a bit early to get excited and eager, but we want you to hit the ground running once these features are available. Stay alert for the new Alarm.com Updates, and be ready once they are here!

If you aren't familiar with the Alarm.com ADC-SWM150, it is a Z-Wave Plus smart water valve that you can use to control the water supply for a location. It is great for turning the water OFF to prevent damage in the event of a serious flood or leak. Many users use these devices in conjunction with flood sensors, and they create smart scenes so that the water valve is CLOSED and the water is SHUT OFF automatically upon a flood sensor detecting a leak and alerting the security system. The unique aspect of the ADC-SWM150 is that it also includes a meter for monitoring and tracking your water usage over time. The ADC-SWM150 is fitted to water pipes of up to 1.25" (31.75mm) in size. It is typically installed by a plumber.

In addition, Alarm Grid recently began offering the Qolsys IQ Water Valve Kits that include both a water valve and a flood sensor. Unlike the ADC-SWM150, the Qolsys IQ Water Valve devices are a bit more DIY-friendly, as they are actually designed to be self-installed by end users, with no need to hire a plumber. However, a Qolsys IQ Water Valve Kit does not include any water meter for tracking water usage, like the one you receive with the ADC-SWM150. For users who decide upon the Qolsys IQ Water Valve Kits, they are available in two (2) distinct variants, those being the Qolsys IQWV908-KIT-PG (PowerG), and the Qolsys IQWV908-KIT-SL (319.5 MHz S-Line)

The Alarm.com ADC-SWM150 and the Qolsys IQ Water Valve Kits are available now on the Alarm Grid website. Do you have any thoughts or questions on these products? Leave a comment down below, and get the discussion flowing along - these are water valves after all! Our team is always interested in what you have to say about the newest security products and services. And of course, remember to keep checking the Alarm Grid Blog for more news and updates coming soon!

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We have a quick and easy tip for those using Z-Wave locks with Honeywell and Resideo ProSeries Panels like the Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS. You can have your panel user code pushed down to your Z-Wave lock, and you can also have your system automatically disarm when you enter that code into the lock.

Setting this feature up will offer some great convenience in your life. You can imagine walking up to your home, entering your panel code into your Z-Wave lock, the door unlocking, and then your system disarming, without you needing to interact with the panel at all, and then going about your day. We'll show you how to make it happen.

You can set this feature up for any panel code that you have programmed on your ProSeries System. Begin from the main screen, and choose the three (3) horizontal bars button at the bottom, followed by Settings, then User Management. Enter your Master Code (default 1234, but usually changed) or your Installer Code (default 4112) to get in. Then select the user with the code you want to use at the lock. Scroll down to Z-Wave Lock Control, and you can choose one of the following three (3) options:

  • None - Turns the feature off
  • Sync User Code to Lock - The code will be pushed to the lock so that you can unlock using the code.
  • Sync User Code to Lock & Disarm - The "money" option! The code will be pushed to the lock so that you can unlock using the code, AND the ProSeries System will disarm when you enter the code and unlock the lock!

Just choose the option that you want for that code (you know which one we recommend), and then press the black Save button in the upper-right corner. You will need to provide the system's Master Code to confirm the change, and then you're all set! We can't state enough how cool this feature is, so take advantage of it!


But before you go and make your life more convenient, why not make your life more EXCITING by leaving a comment on the Alarm Grid Blog? Let us know what you think of the feature. Have you tried it out before? Are you going to test it now. Do you need to buy a Z-Wave lock first? How about the Yale YRD226? We think that's a handsome lock, and it will look great in your residence. We promise! Anyway, stay tuned for more great content like this on the Alarm Grid Blog, coming soon!

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We have a quick tip today for users setting up Notifications on Total Connect 2.0, specifically regarding Notification Triggers for IP cameras. The HD cameras offer a much more diverse selection of Notification Triggers than legacy cameras, which have "Video Events" as their only option.

If you are not familiar with Total Connect 2.0 Text and Email Notifications, then the term "Notification Triggers" is used to identify the action(s) that cause text and/or email alerts to be sent to designated users. In the case of security cameras, you will likely want to be notified if your camera records a video clip. That way, you will know to check out the clip and make sure that everything is alright.

However, the selection of Notification Triggers is much wider if you are working with an HD camera versus and older legacy camera. For an HD camera, you can choose specific types of video captures for notifications, while leaving other types of video captures off the trigger list so that you aren't necessarily notified for every type of camera recording. For instance, you might want to be notified if your camera records a clip for an alarm event or due to detecting motion, but not if your camera begins recording due to sound-based detection.

Note the available selections in the list below. You can pick and choose which of these notifications you want to use with your Total Connect 2.0 HD camera, and which ones you do not. If you choose all eight (8), then it will essentially serve as the greyed out "Video Events" option, which is the only viable option when using legacy cameras.


But as you will notice for legacy cameras, only "Video Events" can be selected as the Notification Trigger. This is pretty much a cover-all option that includes all the individually selectable options that you would have for an HD camera. In other words, if you want to set up Notifications for any legacy cameras, then you will have to make it so that any and all camera activity will trigger a notification. For that reason, it is extra important that you adjust the sensitivity levels for your legacy cameras so that you aren't bombarded by alerts!


For reference, the only HD cameras used with Total Connect 2.0 are the Honeywell IPCAM-WIC1, the Honeywell IPCAM-WIC2, and the discontinued Honeywell IPCAM-WOC1. All other IP cameras used with TC2 are legacy devices. There is hope and speculation that Resideo (formerly Honeywell) will unveil some new HD cameras at upcoming ISC West 2021, but that is a story for another time.

This doesn't mean that if you mix and match legacy and HD cameras on a single TC2 account that you are restricted to "Video Events" for your Notification Triggers. You can create separate sets of notifications as needed so that you have fully customized alerts for your HD cameras, plus the "Video Events" Notifications set up for your legacy cameras.

Don't forget that Total Connect 2.0 allows you to have up to eight (8) HD cameras per account, plus a maximum of six (6) legacy cameras. You may want to refer to this helpful FAQ for more information on Total Connect 2.0 Clip Limits. We know that it can be a bit confusing regarding all the separate rules for HD vs legacy cameras on Total Connect 2.0, so definitely refer to that guide if you need a refresher!

Also, make sure to read our complete guide to setting up Total Connect 2.0 Notifications. That will show you exactly how to create TC2 Notifications the way you want so that you and those around you are properly alerted to events and activity on your security system, which includes any security cameras you have set up. Don't forget to leave a comment down below with your thoughts on Total Connect 2.0 Notifications and Alerts. We're very interested to hear what you have to say. And remember to stay tuned to the Alarm Grid Blog for more security content, news, and tips coming soon!

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Alarm Grid is happy to announce that the Honeywell Home PROSIXRPTR Wireless Repeater is now available for purchase. The wireless repeater works with Honeywell Home and Resideo PROSIX Sensors and Honeywell SiX Sensors used with the ProSeries Security Panels, including the PROA7PLUS.

If you aren't familiar with wireless repeaters, these devices effectively double the range of compatible wireless sensors. This works by taking the wireless signal sent out from a wireless sensor and sending it out a second time, thereby effectively repeating the signal and doubling the sensor's range, assuming that the repeater module is placed strategically. The PROSIXRPTR is the first wireless repeater released from Resideo since the Honeywell 5800RP Wireless Repeater which is used to repeat the wireless signals of Honeywell 5800 Sensors. The new PROSIXRPTR is also the first-ever encrypted wireless repeater released by Resideo. Up to two (2) PROSIXRPTR devices can be used with a ProSeries System, with each repeater being placed in a different direction from a centralized ProSeries Panel.

There's a lot to take in with the PROSIXRPTR, so we'll do our best to cover everything here. The first thing we want to note is that the PROSIXRPTR is not a "plug-and-play" device, as you may be accustomed to with most wireless repeaters. In other words, the PROSIXRPTR will not begin repeating wireless signals until it is enrolled with a ProSeries Panel. These panels include the aforementioned PROA7PLUS, the Resideo PROA7PLUSC, the Resideo PROA7C, and the Honeywell Home PROA7. Any ProSeries Alarm System in need of a PROSIXRPTR Wireless Repeater must be on at least Firmware Version 3.591.92.0, which you can read about in greater detail here. The reason why the PROSIXRPTR needs to be enrolled with the alarm panel is because it is interacting with encrypted signals, and it needs to know sensitive network information to do its job successfully. Although you can have two (2) different PROSIXRPTR modules paired with a single ProSeries Panel, the two units will not communicate or "talk with" each other in anyway, and you cannot use a "series" setup to "triple" the range by having a sensor signal bounce off of one PROSIXRPTR to another PROSIXRPTR on its way to the panel. The PROSIX or SiX wireless signal will only be recognized by a single PROSIXRPTR, it will get repeated once, and will then end up at the ProSeries alarm panel.

There are other limitations affecting the PROSIXRPTR Repeater that should be discussed. While the unit can repeat SiX Sensors used with a ProSeries Alarm Panel on a high enough firmware version, the PROSIXRPTR cannot repeat the signals for SiX Series Sensors used on a Honeywell Lyric Security System. Remember, the PROSIXRPTR must enroll with the panel it is being used with. The unit has no way of integrating with the Lyric, and it cannot repeat wireless SiX Series signals used with that system. Unfortunately, Resideo never released a repeater for the Lyric and SiX Sensors, so that is just a limitation that Lyric users will have to live with, at least for now. The PROSIXRPTR also cannot repeat the signals of any legacy sensors that are being used with the Honeywell Home PROTAKEOVER Module. There are various legacy wireless repeaters available, so please reach out to us at support@alarmgrid.com during our usual 9am to 8pm ET M-F business hours if you need help figuring out which one to get for your alarm system.

One other thing we want to note with the PROSIXRPTR is that while it comes with its own transformer and backup battery, it does not come with any cabling for connecting the transformer. Make sure you have some around when you go to set it up. The unit supports a wire run of up to fifty (50) feet (~15.2 meters) when using 18 AWG cabling, and the maximum distance goes down if thinner cabling is used, so make sure to observe the permitted wire runs. Alarm Grid offers alarm wiring on its website if you need some. We even offer 10 ft., 15 ft., and 25 ft., pre-cut lengths of 22 gauge, 4-conductor wire. Or, you should be able to find some at your local hardware store. You can also use a Honeywell LT-Cable if you don't want to prepare your own wiring.

The PROSIXRPTR can be purchased on our website now! Please email us if you have any questions. Also, don't forget to leave a comment down below to share your thoughts on this new unit. We would love to hear what you have to say. And of course, keep paying close attention to the Alarm Grid Blog if you want to hear the latest security news, tips, and product releases. We'll be back soon, so stay posted!

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Alarm Grid is closing early today Monday, July 5th, at 2pm ET. We will be returning at 9am ET tomorrow, July 6th. If you need to reach us, please contact our support email support@alarmgrid.com. We will do our best to give you a prompt reply as soon as we can upon our return tomorrow.

Remember, if you need to put your system on test mode with our central station partner Criticom Monitoring Services (CMS), you should call our number (888) 818-7728, and choose option [9]. If you are an Alarm Grid monitored customer in Canada, and you need to put your account on test mode with Rapid Response, you should call (800) 932-3822. Again, we will be back tomorrow with our regular business hours.

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Welcome back from 4th of July! We have had a busy past couple of weeks at Alarm Grid since our last video recap. This time, we have seven (7) new videos to show you, including five (5) with Jorge and two with myself. We cover the PROA7PLUS, 2GIG Edge Cameras, and 2GIG GC2 Firmware Updates!

2GIG Edge: Alarm.com Cameras that Support Live Streaming

Jorge explains which Alarm.com Security Cameras can be streamed directly to a 2GIG Edge Alarm Panel. Most of the newer Alarm.com Cameras can be used in this way. In order for this to work, a camera must be paired with the same Alarm.com account used with the 2GIG Edge, and it must be enabled for panel streaming from the Alarm.com website or mobile app. Cameras can be streamed from the Smart Home Menu on the 2GIG Edge.

2GIG Edge: Alarm.com Cameras that Support 2-Way Audio via Live-Streaming

Jorge teaches users about two-way audio playback when live-streaming security cameras on the 2GIG Edge. While nearly all Alarm.com Cameras can be used for video streaming on the 2GIG Edge, only a smaller selection of cameras can be used for live audio streaming. Really, it's mostly the indoor residential cameras that do audio streaming. Most of the Alarm.com Commercial Cameras that support Power over Ethernet (PoE) and all Alarm.com Outdoor Cameras do not support two-way audio, as they typically do not have built-in microphones.


2GIG Easy Updater Tool: Updating

Jorge explains how to update the 2GIG UPDV Easy Updater Tool that is used to update the firmware on a 2GIG Go!Control GC2 Security System. The Easy Updater Tool contains the firmware update for the GC2 System. If the firmware on the Updater Tool is outdated, then you must update the Updater Tool by following the process outlined in this video. The current downloaded firmware on the Updater Tool will be displayed across the device screen when power is applied. This will let you know if you need to updater the Updater Tool.


2GIG GC2: Updating Using the Easy Updater Tool

Jorge teaches you how to use the 2GIG UPDV Easy Updater Tool to update the firmware on a 2GIG Go!Control GC2 Alarm Panel. After you have updated the firmware on the Updater Tool itself, you can then use the device to update the firmware on the GC2 Panel. Updating to the latest firmware version will ensure that you can use all of the released features for the system and that all of the latest hardware is supported. The LTE communicators for activating with Alarm.com and alarm monitoring will require a certain firmware version.


Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS: Delete a Zone

Jorge shows you how to delete a zone on a Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS or other ProSeries Alarm System. When you delete a zone, the associated sensor will no longer be programmed with the system. You would need to re-enroll it in order to continue using it. For the encrypted PROSIX Sensors and SiX Sensors, after deleting the sensor, you will then be able to enroll it with a new ProSeries Panel, provided that the sensor received the deletion signal from the panel. When deleting PROSIX and SiX Sensors, be sure the sensor is powered on and within range of the ProSeries Panel at the time of deletion.


Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS: Add a User Code

I show you how to add a new user code to a Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS Alarm System or other ProSeries Panel. All of the ProSeries Systems support up to (96) total user codes, so you should have no trouble giving everyone in your household or office their very own code to use when controlling the system. After you have added a user code, you can then go back into user settings to configure automatic Bluetooth disarming and Z-Wave lock functionality for the user.


Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS: Clear a Tamper Error

I show you how to clear a tamper error on a Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS or other ProSeries Security Controller. A tamper error occurs when the red tamper button on the back of the ProSeries Controller isn't held down properly. This is usually because the system has been taken off its backplate, or it isn't mounted on its backplate properly. Once you get the panel back on the backplate, you can then acknowledge the tamper condition by entering the system's Master Code when prompted.

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The leading keypad option for the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus is unquestionably the Qolsys IQ Remote. This innovative touchscreen keypad mimics the screen of an IQ2 or IQ2+, and it allows for security and automation control from a second on-site location. But sadly, it lacks a replaceable battery!

To be clear, the Qolsys IQ Remote does have a backup battery. When AC power for the IQ Remote is lost (either due to the transformer being unplugged or an electrical outage), the backup battery will keep it running for several hours. But like any rechargeable battery, the one inside the Qolsys IQ Remote has a limited useful life. And once that useful life is up, the battery cannot be replaced with a new one. This means that the IQ Remote Keypad will need to be plugged in at all times in order to be used. If AC power becomes lost for any reason once this happens, then the IQ Remote will immediately power down. Also, the keypad will then always show a low-battery warning that can never be cleared. While not completely debilitating, it is an unfortunate aspect of the Qolsys IQ Remote device.

When we spoke with Qolsys about this issue, they assured us that the IQ Remote battery is "very long lasting", and a user shouldn't encounter this issue for at least ten (10) years from the initial manufacture date, assuming that the battery is cared for properly. Additionally, the company has stated that they have not received any excessive reports of IQ Remote battery failures since its release more than five (5) years ago. But it's fair to expect that Qolsys might be hearing about this issue more frequently in about five year's time when a large number of Qolsys IQ Remote batteries begin failing! At least most IQ Remote Keypads are not carried or transported around, and most users just leave them mounted in a single location. If a user gets a backup generator for the device, then the issue might not cause serious problems.

Still, this is definitely a disappointing limitation of the Qolsys IQ Remote Keypad. We hope that Qolsys will see this message and consider updating the IQ Remote to support an end-user replaceable battery. A well-constructed device can certainly be used for more than 10 years, but it needs a replaceable battery option so that it can truly go the maximum distance. Also, for anyone considering the IQ Remote for use with an IQ Panel 2 or IQ Panel 2 Plus, we still think it's a great keypad option, and we still recommend using it. Just be aware that after ten (10) years or so, the battery will probably stop holding a charge and will begin not working as intended. The keypad will need to be plugged in and receiving power at all times once this happens, or else it will power down immediately. Our hope is that Qolsys redesigns the IQ Remote Keypad to put an end to this issue. Then a user can buy a new battery once the original reaches its end-of-life, install the new one, and keep using this great keypad!

For now, we would love to hear what you have to say about the Qolsys IQ Remote lacking a replaceable battery. Does this issue influence your decision in buying this keypad? Or do you think that it's not a major concern? Please let us know your thoughts in a comment down below. We're sure that many users who buy this keypad, and also those who have bought it in the past, may be surprised to learn that the device's backup battery cannot be replaced. And if we ever learn of Qolsys updating the IQ Remote to fix this issue, or releasing a successor keypad with a replaceable battery, then we will be sure to let you know in the Alarm Grid Blog so that you can make an informed buying decision. Please stay tuned for more security news and updates coming real soon!

And before we forget, we wish everyone in the United States a Happy Independence Day (4th of July) over this upcoming weekend! We are open today, Friday, July 2nd, and we will also be open for business as usual on Monday, July 5th. We look forward to serving you!

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If you are looking for an affordable and effective way to monitor your home and see what's going on while you are away, then image sensors might be worth exploring. When used in conjunction with security systems, image sensors offer great function and convenience, all for a low price.


The simplest way to describe an image sensor is as a motion detection sensor combined with a still-picture camera. Unlike security cameras that capture full-motion video footage, most image sensors will only produce non-moving images. These are some of the most interesting and unique devices that you can use with a home alarm system. While image sensors certainly aren't for everyone, many end-users take full advantage of these peripherals and what they have to offer. Overall, image sensors can go a long way towards rounding out your security system and helping you get the most out of it.

Perhaps the best way to use image sensors is as alarm verification devices. If you live in a jurisdiction where verified response is required, then using image sensors is often the only option you can use to verify an intrusion, short of upgrading to full video monitoring service. Depending on the image sensor and system you are using, you may be able to achieve a setup where captured image sensor pictures are sent to the central station for immediate review. A trained operator can review the images and use them as sufficient proof of a crime in progress and use that as grounds for requesting emergency dispatch. You should check your local alarm codes and ask your monitoring company if verified response is enforced in your area. .Alarm Grid monitored customers can email us at support@alarmgrid,com. We respond to emails during our regular business hours of 9 am to 8 pm ET M-F.

You might be wondering why image sensors aren't more popular than they already are. While image sensors sound excellent in theory, and they often meet those high expectations in practice as well, they are somewhat quirky devices that can present a unique set of challenges. That's also not to mention that some image sensors have notable limitations and restrictions in how they can be used. This shouldn't scare you away from using them, but you should understand that you may have to overcome some obstacles to achieve the setup you want. And also understand that some systems cannot support image sensors in any fashion.

One thing to consider with image sensors is that they are always two-way communication devices. You might call them bi-directional sensors. With image sensors, it's not as simple as the sensor sending a signal to the alarm panel. The panel also needs to send signals to the image sensor. For example, if an alarm is triggered on the system, then the system needs to be able to tell the image sensor that an alarm has occurred, and the image sensor needs to capture a photo of the scene. Then the image sensor needs to turn around and send the image to the panel so that it can ultimately be distributed to an interactive security notification platform, and potentially the central station, and the end-user. The bi-directional communication is also what makes it possible for an end-user to request image sensor photos in real-time, when supported. Because of this, many alarm panels cannot support image sensors unless a specific image sensor transceiver module is added to facilitate two-way communication. And for some panels, image sensor support isn't even possible, as no compatible image sensors and/or image sensor transceivers exist for the panel.

Now that we have talked about image sensors in general, let's start exploring some of the specific models. To make this a bit more simple, we will try and focus on different options available on a panel-by-panel basis. Just like with regular sensors, image sensor support depends on which panel is being used. We will start by addressing the fact that most of the Honeywell Alarm Panels don't support image sensors, though there is an exception. The Honeywell Lyric, the Honeywell LYNX Panels, and the Honeywell VISTA Panels all lack image sensor support.

Interestingly though, the Honeywell Home and Resideo ProSeries Panels - PROA7PLUS, PROA7PLUSC, PROA7, and PROA7C - all have a fairly unique image sensor option in the Honeywell Home PROINDMV. This is the only image sensor presented in this blog that can be set to capture full-motion video (10 fps) or still motion images (320x240). Captured video and images can be viewed at the panel under Panel Camera History, with the ten (10) newest captures being available for viewing. Captured footage is also sent to Total Connect 2.0 for remote viewing. At the time of this writing, the PROINDMV is the only image sensor available for use with TC2. This also makes it the only image sensor we offer that can be used with an IP-only monitoring plan. We're sure that Resideo is also working on a way to make captured video and photos visible to central station operators, but we haven't heard of such a feature being set up just yet. There is also a downside to the PROINDMV in that you cannot use it to request video and/or images. In other words, no peek-in function is available for the PROINDMV, at least not at this time.

Moving onto the Alarm.com Security Systems, pretty much all of the most popular systems have some image sensor option available. It seems that Alarm.com has really embraced this technology and made it possible for almost all users to start using image sensors. We will start with the PowerG Image Sensors, which are some of the most popular image sensors we offer. As PowerG already operates using two-way communication, PowerG Image Sensors do not require any special modules or add-ons for support. You just need a system that supports regular PowerG Sensors, such as a Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus or a DSC PowerSeries NEO with an added PowerG Transceiver. And even better if you have an IQ2+ you will be able to view captured images from the alarm panel, in addition to viewing them from Alarm.com. One limitation however is that these image sensors will only capture images when they specifically trigger alarms on the system. Alarms caused by other zones will not result in the PowerG Image Sensors producing photos. There are currently two (2) PowerG Image Sensors, those being the DSC PG9934P Indoor Image Sensor and the DSC PG9944 Outdoor Image Sensor.

All of the other image sensors used with Alarm.com Systems require some type of hardware add-on for the panel. Sticking with Qolsys, adding the Qolsys IQ Card-IS to the original IQ Panel 2 will make it possible to enroll the Qolsys QZ81030-840 Image Sensor with the system. Technically, you can also add the IQ Card-IS to a newer Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus, but doing so will require it to "steal" the internal antenna used by the PowerG Daughtercard. This will result in the system having virtually zero useful wireless range with Power Sensors. As a result, anyone with an IQ Panel 2 Plus is strongly discouraged from going the route of the IQ Card-IS and QZ81030-840 combo, and just get PowerG Image Sensors instead. But if you do have an original IQ2, then using a QZ81030-840 with an IQ Card-IS is a great option.

The 2GIG Alarm Panels also support image sensors, but only if an image sensor module add-on has been added to the system. Starting with the 2GIG GC2 and its successor, the 2GIG GC2e, both systems can support the 2GIG IMAGE1 Image Sensor after a 2GIG XCVR2-345 Image Sensor Module has been added and installed. Unfortunately, for 2GIG GC2e users, adding the 2GIG XCVR2-345 will take away the system's ability to support 2GIG eSeries Encrypted Sensors. We have heard rumors in the past that a 2GIG XCVR2e-345 Image Sensor Transceiver Module would be specifically manufactured for the 2GIG GC2e so that the system could support both image sensors and encrypted sensors simultaneously, but it's looking increasingly likely as of late that such a release may never see the light of day. Even then, the 2GIG IMAGE1 is an older device, and it isn't known for producing the most detailed images. Still, for alarm verification purposes, it usually gets the job done. Both the IMAGE1 and the XCVR2-345 are still available on our website.

Moving onto the 2GIG GC3 and 2GIG GC3e, both of these systems support the 2GIG XCVR3-GC3 Image Sensor Module, to allow 2GIG IMAGE2 and 2GIG IMAGE3 Image Sensors to be paired. Don't let the need for the XCVR3-GC3 scare you away. The module is extremely affordable and very easy to install. It just uses a 4-wire connection with the system board, and it hangs out the back of panel. Unlike the issues experienced with the GC2e, adding the 2GIG XCVR3-GC3 to a GC3e will NOT take away the panel's ability to support 2GIG eSeries Encrypted Sensors. Furthermore, the supported image sensor devices for the XCVR3-GC3 are newer, and they are known for producing clearer images than the earlier IMAGE1. The 2GIG IMAGE2 is still relatively basic with its 320x240 QVGA resolution. But the 2GIG IMAGE3 really shines with its 640x480 VGA resolution, thereby making it one of the best image sensors on the market. These image sensors can be set to automatically produce images during alarm events, and a user can even manually request images using the "peek-in" feature on Alarm.com. All things considered, image sensor support for the GC3 and GC3e is surprisingly robust, and in our opinion, quite underrated. These really are some of the best alarm systems available for image sensor support, and we think more GC3 and GC3e users should take advantage of images sensors and what they can bring to one of these systems.

Unfortunately, we have to end this post with the sad story of image sensor support on the 2GIG Edge. While the 2GIG Edge has made a huge splash in the security industry, representing one of the most exciting panel debuts we have seen of late, image sensor support for the system is basically non-existent. To elaborate, the 2GIG Edge supports the same image sensor module add-on as the GC3 and GC3e, that being the 2GIG XCVR3-GC3, and it remains very easy to install, using the same 4-wire connection as before, and just hanging out the back of the panel. Once added, you can pair the 2GIG IMAGE3 Image Sensor with the Edge, but the 2GIG IMAGE2 is unsupported. We're glad that 2GIG chose the "better" of the two image sensors to work with the Edge, but we're still a bit surprised that the IMAGE2 can't interface with the Edge and the XCVR3-GC3 combo. Fortunately, just like with the 2GIG GC3e, adding the 2GIG XCVR3-GC3 to the Edge will not eliminate the system's ability to support 2GIG eSeries Encrypted Sensors.

However, and this is a big deal, the 2GIG Edge with 2GIG XCVR3-GC3 will only see the 2GIG IMAGE3 as a standard motion detection sensor. In other words, the Edge cannot receive any of the captured images from the IMAGE3. And since the Edge can't get the captured images, it therefore cannot forward them to Alarm.com and/or the central station. This makes the 2GIG IMAGE3 nothing more than a fancy motion sensor for the Edge. It's super unfortunate, and one of the saddest things to learn about the 2GIG Edge. There is a ray of hope though. 2GIG has stated that this behavior between the Edge and IMAGE3 is not intentional, and they are working on a firmware fix to provide true image sensor support for the Edge in the future. No ETA for a fix is currently available, but we are hopeful that the 2GIG Edge will one day be able to carry on 2GIG's legacy of having some of the best image sensor support in the industry. For more information, we have a blog on the limitations of the 2GIG Edge in regards to image sensor support, which you can view here. And you can certainly expect Alarm Grid to provide an update once image sensor support for the 2GIG Edge has been fixed and made to work as intended.

We hope that this post has opened up your mind towards adding image sensors to your security system. They really are some useful and handy devices when set up properly. Users in verified response jurisdictions who aren't quite ready to make the jump to video cameras and the more expensive monitoring plans that come with them can often get started with image sensors at very little cost. And with a bit of testing and configuration, yours can truly be great and help you keep your home safe. If you have any thoughts or questions about image sensors, please leave them in a comment down below. We are eager for some fun and enthusiastic discussion about image sensors and what they can offer for home security. And don't forget to keep checking the Alarm Grid Blog, as we will have some more great topics to cover and discuss in the near future.

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