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After much anticipation, the DSC PG9WLSHW8 PowerG Wired to Wireless Converter is finally available! End users now how a reliable option for taking existing hardwired security and life-safety sensors and interfacing them with a security system that supports PowerG Wireless Sensors.


Wired to wireless converter modules for wireless security systems are nothing new. Hardwired sensors connect with wired to wireless converter modules. The converter then sends wireless signal to the panel on behalf of the connected wired sensors. The wired sensors can then be programmed to wireless zones on the system. As far as the system is concerned, the wired sensors at the converter module are no different than wireless sensors.

How the DSC PG9WLSHW8 differs from prior wired to wireless converters is that it transmits wireless signals across the PowerG wireless protocol. PowerG uses Frequency Hopping Spread Spectrum (FHSS) technology to prevent RF jamming, with the communication signals constantly switching between frequencies from 912 MHz to 918 MHz. In addition to using FHSS technology, PowerG Sensors also take advantage of military grade 128-bit AES encryption for enhanced wireless security. This makes these sensors some of the most secure wireless devices in the industry. Any hardwired sensor connected with the DSC PG9WLSHW8 will utilize this same level of security and protection.

But PowerG Sensors offer more than just top-grade security. They also offer incredible wireless range. Depending on the system being used, a PowerG Sensor is able to communicate from up to two (2) kilometers (km) away in an open air environment. This capability also applies to the DSC PG9WLSHW8. With perfect, direct line-of-sight, you can have the converter module up to 2km away from certain compatible panels and expect the signals to go through reliably. That is perfect for large buildings, including hospitals, warehouses, schools, and more. You would be very hard-pressed to find another wireless sensor lineup with the same communication range capabilities as PowerG.

There are all sorts of possible applications for the DSC PG9WLSHW8 Wired to Wireless Converter. Arguably the most popular use will be for bringing over hardwired sensors for use with a Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus Security System. All versions of the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus can support PowerG Sensors. And correspondingly, these panels can all support the DSC PG9WLSHW8. Just be aware that the IQ2+ has a smaller antenna than the other PowerG Security Systems, so its wireless range is limited to roughly 2,000 feet in open air. Other compatible systems for the DSC PG9WLSHW8 include the DSC Iotega and the DSC PowerSeires NEO with an added PowerG Wireless Transceiver.

But there is so much else about the DSC PG9WLSHW8 that makes it such an exciting piece of equipment! Namely, the unit has four (4) programmable outputs (PGMs) for connecting relay-triggered devices. The second programmable output (PGM2) is particularly notable, as you can connect up to (18) 2-wire smoke detector units at this location. Alternatively, you can also use 4-wire smoke detectors and wired CO detectors are regular zone inputs for the unit. The PGMs are also useful for connecting wired sirens, as the unit provides a supervised bell output of 12V @ 700mA. And installers will really appreciate the fact that the module allows for end-of-line resistor (EOLR) value learning from 1k to 10k ohm resistors. Both single-end-of-line (SEOL) and double-end-of-line (DEOL) resistor wiring is supported.

One final and very important note about the DSC PG9WLSHW8 is that stock for the item is currently severely limited due to the ongoing pandemic. It's possible that if you order the PG9WLSHW8, you might be put on a waiting list for the item, as our manufacturers try and keep up with constant demand for products. If you do end up buying the DSC PG9WLSHW8 while it is back-ordered (BO), then our team will contact you at our earliest convenience to let you know about the situation. If you do decide to cancel the order due to it being back-ordered, then your debit or credit card will be refunded for the entire cost of the order.

If you have any questions about the DSC PG9WLSHW8 or about alarm monitoring in general, then please reach out to us! The best way to contact us is by emailing support@alarmgrid.com. This is also a great email to use if you want to find out if the DSC PG9WLSHW8 or any other product sold by Alarm Grid is currently in-stock or back-ordered. Our team checks email from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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Just weeks after their last update, Alarm.com is already touting a new mobile app version for both Android and iOS. This time, it's Version 4.14. It will offer some new features and stability fixes. Users should upgrade as soon as possible once available. The update should be released soon.


The main upgrade featured in Alarm.com Mobile App Version 4.14 involves the Alarm.com Doorbell Cameras. Specifically, these are the SkyBell ADC-VDB101 and SkyBell ADC-VDB102 Round Doorbell, as well as the SkyBell ADC-VDB105 and SkyBell ADC-VDB106 Slimline Doorbell. Mobile App Update 4.14 adds new actions to the Doorbell Call Menu within the app. This will allow users to more quickly respond to visitors.

Through the Doorbell Call Menu, users will be able to adjust their lighting devices, control their garage doors, and even arm their systems. Previously, the Doorbell Call Menu only allowed users to disarm their systems and operate Z-Wave door locks. We expect that this increased functionality will prove to be very useful for end users who have video doorbells set up for use with the Alarm.com.

And like always, a new update should provide general stability improvements and a more consistent end user experience overall. That is why we recommend updating to the latest version as soon as it is available. Alarm.com tends to have somewhat of a delay between announcing new app updates and actually releasing them. Don't be surprised if Version 4.14 isn't released for several days from now.

If you have any questions about Alarm.com, or if you are interested in starting Alarm.com monitoring service, please reach out to us! We would be happy to help you get started with your own Alarm.com Security System for your home or business. The best way to contact us is to email support@alarmgrid.com. We check our email from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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Alarm Grid is back with another video recap, this time covering videos from July 21st thru July 24th. The highlights this week include a classic video from Jorge, as well as the start of a new video series where I teach you how to set up the DSC PowerSeries NEO. Let's check out the videos!

Connecting a Honeywell Tuxedo Touch to WIFI

Jorge shows you how to connect a Honeywell Tuxedo Touch to a local WIFI network. The Tuxedo Touch uses an internet connection for sending and receiving Z-Wave signals from Total Connect 2.0. It is important to understand that the Tuxedo Touch is not actually an AlarmNet Communicator for facilitating monitoring service. Its internet connection is merely for automation purposes and displaying the current weather forecast. Without a reliable internet connection, the current status of Z-Wave devices on TC2 cannot be updated.


Powering the DSC PowerSeries NEO Security System

I show you how to provide power to a DSC PowerSeries NEO Security System Primary power comes from a 16.5VAC, 40VA transformer. Since AC power is being used, polarity does not matter when connecting wires to the module. We recommend using 18-AWG, 2-Conductor wire for this job. But if you have existing wire lying around, then that should work fine, as long as maximum wire run limits are observed. The PowerSeries NEO also receives backup power from a connected battery.


Add Wired Keypad to DSC PowerSeries NEO Security System

I show you how to add a wired alphanumeric keypad to a DSC PowerSeries NEO Alarm System. The first keypad you add to your NEO Panel should be a wired alphanumeric model for programming purposes. In particular, we recommend using the DSC HS2LCDRF9 N for this purpose. That model includes a built-in PowerG Transceiver so that you can begin adding wireless PowerG Sensors with your system. The initial keypad allows for one-touch enrollment, while additional keypads must be added through the initial keypad.



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Many users consider adding keypads to their alarm systems so that they can control their systems from multiple on-site locations. And for wired panels, at least one keypad is required for on-site operation. Today, we will briefly cover some of the alarm keypads that you might encounter.

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First, it is important to understand that a keypad is NOT an actual alarm system. It is merely an input and output device for an alarm system. A user will input commands through the alarm keypad. The system will also provide information about security panel status through the keypad. Nearly all keypads will provide basic functionality, such as arming and disarming and bypassing zones. Some more advanced keypads may offer additional capabilities, such as system programming and performing home automation functions.

If you have a wired system, then you will absolutely need at least one keypad. This is because the panel will need some means for on-site operation. When adding your first keypad to a wired system, it is usually recommended that you get an alphanumeric keypad with a built-in wireless receiver. Alphanumeric means that the keypad will display full language text, which is important for successfully programming the system. Having a built-in wireless receiver will allow you to start pairing wireless sensors with the system, which will give you more flexible installation options. Examples of alphanumeric keypads with integrated wireless receivers include the Honeywell 6160RF for Honeywell VISTA Systems and the DSC HS2LCDRF9 N for DSC PowerSeries NEO Systems. For additional keypads, you should just use standard keypad models, without integrated wireless receiver modules.

But for a wireless system, adding a keypad is almost always optional. This is because a wireless panel is consider "all-in-one", and you can control the system directly from the panel itself. Some wireless panels like the Honeywell Lyric and the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus have built-in touchscreen controllers for this purpose. Other wireless panels like the Honeywell LYNX Plus L3000 have a less fancy, but still perfectly functional, numeric touchpad for this task. Most wireless system users don't bother adding an external system keypad.

That being said, you can still choose to add a keypad to a wireless system if you want. The benefit to adding a keypad is that you will have an additional physical device for controlling your system while you are on-site. This can be very useful if you have multiple entrances for coming and going, such as a front door, back door, and garage door. You might also consider putting a keypad in an easily accessible location, such as by the bed in your master bedroom so that you can conveniently operate your security system from that location as well.

Many systems will provide you with multiple keypad options to choose from. Depending on your needs, you may be selecting between a numeric touchpad keypad and a touchscreen keypad. A numeric touchpad keypad is operated by pressing various buttons on the device to enter specific codes and command sequences. These keypads are relatively basic, but they can be convenient for performing simple system functions. On the other hand, a touchscreen keypad will provide a colorful touchscreen display with intuitive menu icons. This can be more cheerful and inviting for someone who isn't used to operating an alarm system. The downside with a touchscreen keypad is that they are often much more expensive than numeric touchpad keypads. And it's also important to understand that your selection of keypad choices may be limited based on the panel you are using.

But before you navigate our site to start purchasing new keypads for your system, you should really consider if you actually need one. The most common alternative to a secondary system keypad is an interactive service platform that can be accessed through your phone or a web browser. If your system is monitored, then there's a good chance that you already have access to one of these platforms. Most Alarm Grid monitored customers have access to either Total Connect 2.0 or Alarm.com, depending on the system they are using. Both platforms can be conveniently accessed remotely to offer the same functionality that you would get from a physical on-site keypad. So instead of going to your secondary system keypad, you might just pull up your phone to access Total Connect 2.0 or Alarm.com and control your system from there! Check out our monitoring plans to see which ones offer access to these exciting platforms.

Another option is to get a key fob for your system. A key fob is a small handheld device that enrolls with a security system wirelessly to perform various inputs and commands. You can easily carry a key fob around in your pocket or purse, or you can put it on a key ring for easy access. Then, with a press of a button, you can arm or disarm, trigger an automation device, or activate an alarm on your system. Key fobs are often more limited than fixed-location keypads, but they can be very convenient for performing quick commands. Just make sure to not lose your key fob. The devices are quite small, and they can easily become misplaced or lost. The same usually cannot be said for a keypad mounted on your wall!

If you are interested in learning more about alarm system keypads, or if you want to find out which keypads are compatible with your system, then we are happy to help! We offer a wide selection of keypads for use with many types of security systems. The best way to contact us is to email support@alarmgrid.com. If you are trying to determine system compatibility, then you may want to include a picture of your panel so that we know what brand and model you are working with. Remember that our hours for checking email run from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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We have heard reports lately of RF supervision troubles on 2GIG GC2e and 2GIG GC3e Systems, particularly for zones set up with encrypted 2GIG eSeries Sensors. Upon further testing, we have learned that eSeries Zones configured with incorrect Equipment Codes can cause supervision trouble.

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Equipment Codes are somewhat of a unique quirk for 2GIG Security Systems. This numeric code identifies the model number of the wireless sensor that is being used. It should not be confused with the sensor's Serial Number, which is unique for each individual sensor. You set the Equipment Code when programming a new zone. Alarm Grid has helpful guides available for programming a GC2e zone and programming a GC3e zone.

The following table contains the current list of eSeries Equipment Codes:

Product Name Equipment Code
2GIG eSeries Smoke Detector (USA) 2058
2GIG eSeries CO Detector (USA) 2860
2GIG eSeries Tilt Sensor 2061
2GIG eSeries Flood Sensor 2065
2GIG eSeries Shock Sensor 2066
2GIG eSeries Repeater 2067
2GIG eSeries Translator 2068
2GIG eSeries Water Sensor 2070
2GIG eSeries Thin Door/Window Contact 2862
2GIG eSeries Recessed Door Contact 2863
2GIG eSeries Glass Break Detector 2864
2GIG eSeries Pet-Immune PIR Motion Sensor 2869
2GIG eSeries Takeover Module 2873
2GIG eSeries 4-Button Keyfob Remote 2866

Before the rise of 2GIG eSeries Encrypted Sensors, the Equipment Code setting on a 2GIG System was largely seen as a formality. The general practice was to find the corresponding sensor if available, but generally not worry about it very much if you couldn't match it exactly. Some third-party sensors do not have their own Equipment Codes, and an "equivalent" is usually selected instead. For example, the Honeywell 5800MINI and the VERSA-2GIG can both just use the Equipment Code for "Existing Door/Window Contact", rather than finding an exact match.

But for the 2GIG eSeries Sensors, the Equipment Code selection is actually very important. Failing to set the exact corresponding equipment code can result in the system displaying an RF supervision loss trouble condition for the associated zone. This trouble is typically used to identify that the system has lost communication with the sensor, due to either the sensor powering down from a dead or missing battery, or the sensor being taken out of wireless range. But it seems that the GC2e and GC3e cannot properly supervise a 2GIG eSeries Sensor with an improper Equipment Code. More information can be found in this FAQ.

Missing Equipment Codes are more common for third-party sensors not produced by 2GIG. For a 2GIG Sensor, you should almost always have a direct Equipment Code selection available. And the 2GIG eSeries Sensors are still quite new, so 2GIG made sure to put in Equipment Codes specifically for each of these sensors. However, you may be unable to find an Equipment Code for a brand-new eSeries Sensor if your 2GIG System isn't on the latest firmware version. Adding support for new sensors is a major part of most 2GIG Firmware Updates. You can view our GC2e Firmware Page here, and our GC3e Firmware Page here.

If you need any help programming a GC2e or GC3e wireless zone, then make sure to check out the programming FAQs we linked earlier. Alarm Grid monitored customers can also receive additional free support by emailing support@alarmgrid.com. This is also a great email to use if you are interested in signing up for new monitoring service. We check our email from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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A small town in Texas may become the latest location to begin enforcing alarm system permits. Buda, TX, located south of Austin, TX, is considering a new ordinance that would require local residents and business owners to pay for permits to operate monitored security systems in city limits.

Honeywell lyricpk lte a wireless security system w slash at and

The proposed ordinance includes fees for applying for alarm permits, as well as listed penalties for causing false alarms and/or operating a system without a permit. According to the proposal, a residential alarm permit would cost $25, while a commercial alarm permit would cost $50. Government and educational locations would be exempt from these fees. Similar alarm system policies currently exist in nearby San Marcos, TX and Kyle, TX.

The false alarm penalties mandated by the proposed ordinance are rather relaxed. The first three (3) false alarms within a 12-month period would result in warnings, provided that the user has a system permit. The fourth and fifth false alarms for a registered system within a 12-month period would each result in a $50 fine. The sixth and seventh false alarms for a registered system within a 12-month period would each result in a $75 fine. Any eighth alarm and beyond for a registered system within a 12-month period would result in a $100 fine. And any alarm from an unregistered system would result in a $250 fine.

The ordinance also lists some exemptions for fines and fees:

  • The false alarm was an "act of God".
  • The false alarm was the result of the telephone (POTS) company.
  • The false alarm was caused by a power outage of longer than four (4) hours.
  • An alarm dispatch was not the result of a false alarm.
  • The law enforcement response did not occur within thirty (30) minutes of the dispatch request.

Alarm Grid understands the need for certain jurisdictions to mandate and enforce security system permits. Preventing false alarms and preserving the resources of local emergency services is something we take very seriously. But it is also important to consider that these permits and mandates can make it harder for users to protect their homes and businesses. We ultimately hope that Buda, TX does not decide to pass this ordinance, but we will lawfully comply with whatever decision is made.

When you sign-up for monitoring service with Alarm Grid, we always make sure to check for such policies in your the local area where the system will be used. We want all of our customers to use their systems legally and within the guidelines of any mandates set within the confines of their local jurisdictions. We also work to empower our customers and help them understand their systems so that they can prevent false alarms. Alarm Grid customers are also encouraged to check out this guide on false alarm prevention.

For more information about signing-up for monitoring service and false alarm prevention, please email us at support@alarmgrid.com. We check our email from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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The jurisdiction of Sandy Springs, GA will continue imposing monetary fines against monitoring providers for false alarms that occur on the properties they service. The controversial decision to uphold the prior ruling was recently made by the US Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit.

According to the court, false alarm fines imposed by the jurisdiction of Sandy Springs, GA against monitoring providers are justified. The decision to uphold the prior ruling was based on the grounds of preventing false alarms and reducing the waste of city resources. Sandy Springs, GA will continue to maintain its existing ordinance of escalating false alarm fines.

Based upon the current ordinance, the following false alarm fines in Sandy Springs, GA are enforced by the jurisdiction:

  • $25 for the 1st False Alarm
  • $250 for the 2nd and 3rd False Alarms
  • $500 for the 4th and Every Subsequent False Alarm

These fines are to be imposed against monitoring service providers, not actual end users. In addition, the public safety departments for Sandy Springs, GA will not respond to any alarm from a property that has had its fourth (4th) false alarm event within a two (2) year period. This no response period will last for one year after 4th false alarm event in the 2 year period.

Imposing fines for false alarms from security systems is nothing new. However, charging the monitoring company for a false alarm is rather unusual. Last year, the state of Tennessee outlawed fines against security companies for false alarms. The signed bill in Tennessee only allows actual end users to be charged for excessive false alarms, not monitoring providers.

At Alarm Grid, false alarm prevention is something we take very seriously. We strive to provide our customers with all the tools and resources they need to prevent false alarms. Some of the practices designed to prevent false alarms include setting appropriate Entry and Exit Delay periods, using panel Arm-Confirm features, and enabling Alarm Report Delay if needed. Alarm Grid also supports various security panels that meet the standards mandated by CO-01 of the Security Industry Association (SIA) for false alarm prevention.

However, charging monitoring providers fees for false alarms only makes it more difficult for companies like us to do business. We do our part to empower customers and help them fully understand their system so that they can prevent false alarms on their own. From there, it's up to the end user to implement these advised best practices so that false alarms can be avoided. Ultimately, rulings like this can punish Alarm Grid for mistakes that are not our own.

Alarm Grid believes that preventing false alarms and unnecessary emergency dispatch is the shared responsibility of both the monitoring provider and the end user. The last thing we want is to waste the time and resources of local police departments. Our technicians are trained to set up systems so that false alarms are kept to an absolute minimum. And we are more than happy to provide assistance to any monitored customer in false alarm prevention.

Preventing false alarms entirely is the best solution for everyone involved. It prevents local authorities from wasting time and resources. And it prevents Alarm Grid and end users from receiving unwanted fines and penalties. We understand that mistakes are occasionally made. But it is our goal to minimize any false alarms. As a home and/or business owner using an alarm system, that should be your goal as well. It takes a committed effort from all parties.

But strict false alarm policies like those enforced by Sandy Springs, GA do not help in the matter. The vast majority of end users are not looking to cause false alarms or intentionally create inconvenience for their local authorities. Almost every false alarm or unnecessary dispatch is an innocent mistake that can be prevented with more careful planning and better attention to detail. Punishing alarm providers like us is an ineffective solution to the issue.

If you have central station monitoring service through Alarm Grid, then we invite you to reach out to us for false alarm prevention tips to prevent unwanted fines and wasted resources. You can also view this guide on false alarm prevention. We have many tips to share, so please reach out to us by emailing support@alarmgrid.com. We check our email from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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It's Monday again, and this is normally when we would be present you with a video recap. But since we're still working on getting our entire video team together, we figured this was a good time to catch up on some videos we missed in previous recaps, as well as present some classic videos.


How Do I Clear a Latched Alarm Using a Tuxedo Touch Keypad?

I show you how to clear a latched alarm on a Honeywell Tuxedo Touch Keypad. This is done by performing a typical disarm and then clearing the faulted zone. The reason why alarms become latched or stuck is because of the alarm memory feature on the Honeywell VISTA Systems. The panel wants to be sure that you are aware that an alarm previously occurred, so it makes you clear the faulted zone, even after disarming at the keypad.


Programming a Zone to a 2GIG GC3e

I show you how to program a wireless sensor to a 2GIG GC3e Security System. This is a very important step when setting up a security system. Every sensor used with the system will require at least one zone on the system. When you program the zone, you will set various options and configurations that will determine how the system responds when the associated sensor is faulted. You will also enroll the Serial Number with the GC3e so that the panel can recognize the sensor.


Honeywell 5808W3: Program Low-Temp to Lyric

Alarm Grid Co-Founder Sterling shows you how to program the low-temperature detection function for a Honeywell 5808W3 Smoke Detector to a Honeywell Lyric Alarm System. The Honeywell 5808W3 is a smoke and heat detector that also offers low-temperature detection, which is commonly referred to as freeze detection. The 5808W3 uses Loop Number 3 for low-temperature detection, and it activates a temperatures below 41°F. This is good for letting the user know before the pipes potentially freeze.


Lyric Security System: Change Master Code

Sterling shows you how to change the Master Code on a Honeywell Lyric Security System. The Master Code is used primarily for arming and disarming the system and accessing the Master Tools Menu. It can be used to adjust or change a limited selection of system settings. However, changing most advanced settings and making zone changes will require the Installer Code. We strongly recommend changing the Master Code from its default of 1234 for security purposes. But we advise leaving the Installer Code at its default of 4112.

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We recently checked out a post from Alarms.org highlighting crime reporting statistics from the FBI in 2015. We know this data is a bit old, but it offers some interesting insights on how crime rates are trending in the United States. Property crime is dropping, but there is still danger.

Honeywell lyric controller encrypted wireless security system

Between 2011 and 2015, property crime in the United States dropped by 14.4%. The decline has been even further since 2006, as US property crime has dropped by 25.7% between then and 2015. Burglary rates have also declined from 701 reported burglaries in 2011 to 542 reported burglaries in 2015. It's also worth noting that every recorded US region in the study (Northeast, Midwest, South, West) experienced a decline in reported burglaries.

But despite these favorable statistics, burglaries are still an unfortunate reality for thousands of people every single year. Approximately 2.5 million reported burglaries occurred in 2015. This equates to roughly one burglary every 13 seconds. Of reported burglaries in 2015, only about 13% of the cases were solved. Meanwhile, the other 87% were left unsolved, typically due to the lack of a witness or identifying evidence. Overall, property crimes in 2015 resulted in approximately $14.3 billion in damages.

As for when burglaries occur, you may be surprised to learn that they are 6% more likely to occur during the day (between 6am and 6pm) than at night. This is makes sense, as burglars tend to feel more confident in breaking into homes when nobody is present. And since most people work during the day, logically, burglaries often occur during these times. It's also not too surprising to learn that most burglaries occur in the summer when it isn't cold outside.

The best way to prevent a burglary is to own a security system. A home without a security system is about 300% more likely to be burglarized than an unmonitored home. And it shouldn't come as a surprise that 72.4% of burglaries in the United States occur when nobody is inside the home. You will certainly want an alarm system in place to keep your home monitored and protected while you are away.

If you are interested in getting a security system and monitoring service for your home, then please reach out to Alarm Grid for more information. We offer effective and affordable monitoring plans for all budgets. The easiest way to contact us is to email support@alarmgrid.com. You should respect a timely response during our usual business hours of 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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Alarm Grid monitored customers who receive central station service can now follow a new process for setting up an account with MyAlarms.com. This process is more streamlined, and it makes it much easier and more convenient to get started. Now is a great time to build a MyAlarms.com account!


If you are not familiar with MyAlarms.com, it is a service platform available for those receiving central station service through Criticom Monitoring Services (CMS). Criticom is the official central station partner of Alarm Grid. All of our customers who receive central station monitoring service for homes and/or businesses in the United States are protected by CMS.

By using MyAlarms.com, you can access your personal account to put your system on test mode, view your account information, and access your signal history, all without having to call CMS. This is extremely convenient, and it helps CMS to keep their lines free for real emergencies that require immediate attention. We very strongly recommend using this complementary service if you receive central station service through Criticom.

To get started with MyAlarms.com, the first thing to do is visit the MyAlarms.com website and click on the "Create New User" button at the bottom. Next, you will need to provide both your CS#, which is your unique number associated with your CMS account, as well as your false alarm passcode. Remember that your false alarm passcode is the secret verbal code you use to tell a central station operator that everything is alright in the event that they call you.

If you need to obtain your CS#, then you should call Alarm Grid at (888) 818-7728 and choose option [9] to be automatically re-routed to CMS. From there, CMS will ask you for both your monitored address and the false alarm passcode on your account. They will then be able to provide you with your CS#. We recommend keeping your CS# and storing it in a safe location. Remember, you can call Alarm Grid and choose option [9] to be re-routed to CMS at any time. It does not need to be during our normal business hours. CMS is 24/7/365.

After providing your CS# and your false alarm password, you will then need to build your user account. This will include choosing a user name for logging in, as well as providing your first name, last name, and email address. Once you click the "Create" button after that, your user account will be successfully created. You will then receive a confirmation email at the email address you provided. Click on the verification link, and use the temporary password to log in. You will then be ask to set a permanent password for your MyAlarms.com account.

Once you have built your MyAlarms.com account, you can use your username and password to perform all of the aforementioned activities. This should be your go-to spot for all things related to your CMS account. Most notably, this is the easiest and best way to put your system on test mode when testing your system. Alarm Grid recommends testing your. system once a month. So make sure to take advantage of this awesome resource!

If you have any questions about MyAlarms.com, or if you are interested in signing-up for Alarm Grid monitoring service, please email us at support@alarmgrid.com. Our team is happy to help you get started! We check our email during our regular business hours of 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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