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Anyone who has a Honeywell Security System knows that using and managing codes is very important for getting the most out of the system. This handy guide will show you everything you need to know about Honeywell System Codes, including how they are are used and how they are created.

Basic Information about System Codes

Note that the default Installer and Master Codes for almost any Honeywell System are 4112 and 1234 respectively. Let's start by reviewing basic concepts and information about system codes.

What is a system code?

A system code on a Honeywell Panel is a numeric password that is used to gain access to certain menus of the system and to perform various functions. The main reason that alarm systems have codes is to make sure that the person who is using the system is supposed to have access. Only the end user and any other individuals they have authorized to use their security system should know any of the system codes.

Depending on the type of code, a master user can restrict access to only specific parts of the system for other users. This makes some system codes more powerful than others. For Honeywell Systems, most codes are four-digits in length and use the digits 0-9. This allows for up to 10,000 possible combinations for any given code!

How should I choose a system code?

Any code you use on a Honeywell System should be a code that is easy for the user to remember, but difficult for others to guess. Remember, the purpose of a code is to prevent access to unauthorized users. If an unauthorized user, like an intruder, is able to provide a valid system code, it could result in a serious security breach. Likewise, if an authorized user forgets a code, it can be inconvenient or even impossible to get back in.

Most Honeywell Systems operate using delay periods. In other words, upon entering the premises, a valid code must be provided within a very limited time period to disarm the system. If a valid code is not provided within this specified time, then an alarm will occur. This will give an end user who knows a valid code enough time to disarm the system. But it will not give an intruder nearly enough time to brute force their way into the system by guessing codes.

What types of codes are used on Honeywell Systems?

There are many types of codes used with Honeywell Panels. The most common are outlined below:

  • Master Code: Each system has one Master Code. This is the main code a user will normally use for arming and disarming. It can perform all security functions, add and delete users, change the current Master Code and perform many additional system functions. This code cannot be deleted from the system entirely. Only the main user and operator of the security system should know the Master Code.
  • User Codes: Most Honeywell Systems can have multiple user codes set up. These codes can arm and disarm the system just like the Master Code. However, they cannot perform other system functions. A user code should be provided to a user who needs regular access to the building, but should not be able to adjust important settings and configurations for the alarm system.
  • Installer Code: Each system has one Installer Code. This is the main code that is used for making programming changes to the system. It is needed for adding, deleting and configuring sensors, adjusting entry and exit delay periods and more. Basically any major system setting will require the use of the Installer Code. An important note is that the Installer Code can only disarm the system if it was used to arm the system in the first place. This means that keeping the Installer Code at its default is not a security risk, as long as the code isn't used to arm the system. This code cannot be deleted from the system.
  • Guest Code: Also called a "babysitter code", a guest code is a restricted-access code that can be established on most Honeywell Systems. The important thing to remember about this code is that it can only disarm the system if it was the code used to arm in the first place. This code is best provided to users who need temporary access to the system, such as a house guest, a babysitter or a maintenance person. The main user can arm their system with the guest code so that they can access the premises. But if nobody else should be using the system, then the Master Code or a regular user code can be used to arm so that the guest code cannot gain access.
  • Duress Code: The duress code is a special code that is used to send a secret signal to a central monitoring station, letting them know that help is needed immediately. When this code is entered, it will appear to disarm the system like normal. But in reality, a distress signal will be sent out to the central monitoring station to request immediate help. This code is very rarely used, as its only purpose it to protect the user in hostage situations. Otherwise, this code should never be used. However, it is still important to remember this code, as it can save lives when used properly.
  • Arm Only: On select panels only. This code can arm the system, but it cannot disarm.
  • Partition Master: Only for systems with multiple partitions. This code is the same as a Master Code, but its authority only applies to a specific partition. This type of code is optional on a system, but it can be useful if multiple partitions have been established.

What are default codes?

When a Honeywell System is used for the first time, its Master Code and its Installer Code will be set to default values. For most Honeywell Panels, the default Master Code is 1234, and the default Installer Code is 4112. It is normally recommended that you change the Master Code for security purposes. However, the Installer Code can be left at its default so that the user can get back into programming. Keeping the Installer Code at the default does not present any type of security risk.

Now that we have covered some basic information for system codes, let's look into some specific panels to learn how codes are used.

Honeywell Lyric Controller

Honeywell lyric controller encrypted wireless security system

For the Lyric, codes are managed through the Users Menu. To access this menu, start from the main screen of the system. Choose Security > Tools > Master Code > Users. This menu will allow you to change any system code, with the exception of the Installer code.

Up to 48 unique codes can be added with the system. The code in slot 01 is the Installer Code. The code in slot 02 is the Master Code. The code in slot 47 is the Guest Code. The code in slot 48 is the duress code. All of the other 44 system codes are optional user codes.

Add New Codes

Press the "Add New" button. You can the provide a name for the code, enter in a valid four-digit code, and set whether or not the code can be used to control any Z-Wave door locks. The user number will be automatically assigned. Remember to press the "Save" button in the lower-right corner when you have finished.

Edit Existing Codes

Click on the code you want to edit to highlight it. Then press the Edit button in the lower-left corner of the screen. You can then edit the Name, the 4-digit numeric code and the Z-Wave lock settings for the code. Make sure to press "Save" when finished.

Delete Codes

Click on the code you want to delete to highlight it. Then press the Delete button in the lower-right corner of the screen. Press "Yes" when asked if you are sure. The code will be deleted.

Changing the Installer Code

The default Installer Code for the Honeywell Lyric Alarm System is 4112. We recommend keeping this code at the default to prevent the user from being locked out of programming. However, this code can be changed through programming if desired. You will need the current Installer Code to do this. You cannot do this using the Master Code.

Start from the main screen of the system. Choose Security > Tools > Installer Code (default is 4112) > Program > Installer Code. You can then change the Installer Code for the system. Press the "Done" button in the lower-right corner when finished.

Honeywell LYNX Touch Panels

Honeywell l5210 lynx touch wireless security system with 4 1 sla

Managing user codes for a Honeywell LYNX Touch System is very similar to the process for the Honeywell Lyric Controller. Most codes can be managed through the User Codes menu. To access this menu, start from the main screen, and choose Security > More > Tools > Master Code > Users. This menu will allow you to edit any system code, except for the Installer Code.

Please note that the number of user codes that can be added depends on the type of LYNX Touch Panel that is being used. On each system, the Installer Code will be user 01, the Master Code will be user 02, the Guest Code will be the second-to-last available code, and the Duress Code will be the last.

For reference, the L7000 will support up to 48 codes, the L5210 and L5200 will support up to 32, and the L5100 and L5000 will support up to 16.

Add New Codes

Click the "Add New" button at the bottom of the screen. The following menu will let you change the Name, the four-digit code and the Z-Wave lock settings for the code. The user number for the new code will be automatically assigned. Press "Save" in the lower-right corner to finish.

Edit Codes

Click on the code you want to edit to highlight it. Then press the Edit button in the lower-left corner. From there, you can change the name, the four-digit code, and the Z-Wave lock settings. Press "Save" in the lower-right corner when finished.

Delete Codes

Click on the code you want to delete to highlight it. Then press the Delete button in the lower-right corner. The panel will ask you if you are sure. Choose "Yes". The code will be deleted.

Changing the Installer Code

All of the LYNX Touch Panels use 4112 as their default Installer Code. This code is normally left at its default to prevent the user from being locked out of programming later. But it can be changed using the current Installer Code for the system if desired. Remember, keeping the Installer Code at the default does not present any type of security risk.

To change the code, start from the main screen of the system. Choose Security > More > Tools > Installer Code (default is 4112) > Program > Installer Code. You will then be able to change the Installer Code. Please note that when exiting programming, always choose "Yes" when asked you want to allow the installer to get back into programming. Choosing "No" will lock the user out of programming, and the user will need to use the backdoor method to get back in.

Backdoor Method for Accessing Programming

If you ever get locked out of programming, either due to choosing "No" when asked if you want to allow the Installer to get back into programming, or because you lost an Installer Code that wasn't set to the default of 4112, you can use the backdoor method to get back in.

First, reboot the panel by going to Security > More > Tools > Master Code > Test > Reboot. Alternatively, if you don't know the Master Code, you can power the system down by unplugging the transformer and disconnecting the backup battery. Then power it back on by plugging the transformer in. Once the white screen on the reboot appears, immediately press and hold the Home Button (the picture of the house) on the front of the panel. Release the button once the green bar with "Ready to Arm" appears across the top. Then choose Security, followed by Arm Stay. In the number pad that appears, press Clear, followed by 00. Choose "Program" to enter the Programming Menu.

Once you are inside, you can then set the Installer Code for the system to reenter programming later. You can also restore the system to factory default settings through "Default Config" to restore the system to its factory default settings. This will reset the Master Code to its default of 1234. Please note, this will also delete all programming settings for the system.

Honeywell VISTA P-Series

Honeywell vista 21ip internet alarm control panel open

The VISTA P-Series Panels use hardwired keypads for virtually all system operations and overall access. This includes adding, editing and deleting codes. Since codes do not require deep level programming, alphanumeric keypads and fixed English keypads can be used for this purpose. The VISTA 21iP and VISTA 20P can support up to 48 system codes. The VISTA 15P can support up to 32 system codes. The VISTA 10P can support up to 16 system codes. Remember, two of these slots will go to the Installer Code (slot 01) and the Master Code (slot 02).

For these systems, each Code Type is associated with a particular Authority Level. This Authority Level is assigned when assigning attributes. Please note that since the Installer Code and Master Code are hardcoded to slots 01 and 02 respectively, they are not associated with any particular Authority Level. The table below outlines the the Authority Levels that can be assigned to system codes.

Code Type
Authority Level
Notes
User 0 Can arm and disarm the system.
Arm Only 1 Can only arm the system.
Guest 2 Can disarm if it was the code used to arm.
Duress 3 Sends secret distress signal to station.
Partition Master 4 Partitioned systems only. One per partition.

Also note the various attributes for VISTA System codes:

Attribute
Attribute Number
Assigned Value and Notes
Authority Level 1 See previous table.
Access Group 2 0-8. An entry of [0] means no group.
Active Partitions 3 Enter the partition numbers, then [#].
RF Zone Number 4 2-digit key fob number.
Open/Close Paging 5 0 for No. 1 for Yes.

Add New Codes

Enter the following command on the keypad:

[Master Code] + [8] + [2-digit User Number] + [desired 4-digit code]

The panel will beep to confirm the new code has been added. However, a long tone indicates that the process was unsuccessful, likely because the code was already taken.

Edit Codes

This is basically the same as adding a new code, only you will be working with a code that has already been programmed.

[Master Code] + [8] + [2-digit User Number] + [desired 4-digit code]

The panel will beep to confirm that the code has been changed. But if a long tone is produced, it indicates that the process was unsuccessful. This could be because the code was already taken.

Deleting Codes

Note that you cannot delete the Installer Code or the Master Code. Enter the following command:

[Master Code] + [8] + [2-digit User Number] + [#] + [0]

Assigning Attributes

Enter the following command:

[Master Code] + [8] + [2-digit User Number] + [#] + [Attribute Number] + [Attribute Value]

Backdoor Into Programming

If you don't have your Installer Code or if you have locked yourself out of programming., you can get back into programming using the backdoor method. To do this, power down the panel by unplugging the transformer and disconnecting the backup battery. Press and hold the the [*] and [#] buttons on the keypad simultaneously. With these buttons held down, power the system back on by plugging the transformer back in. The message "20" or "Installer Code 20" should appear on the keypad to indicate that programming has been accessed. Then press [*] + [20] + [4112] to set the Installer Code back to 4112. Then press [*] + [99] to exit programming. Never use [*] + [98] to exit programming, as this will lock you out!

Honeywell LYNX Plus L3000

Honeywell l3000 wireless alarm control panelThe Honeywell LYNX Plus L3000 is relatively outdated by today's standards, but it is still used in some cases. The panel can only support up to 8 different codes. Much like the other panels, slot 01 goes to the Installer Code, and slot 02 goes to the Master Code. These codes cannot be deleted from the panel. Also, slot 07 goes to the Guest Code, and slot 08 goes to the Duress Code. Only codes 03 thru 06 can be assigned to regular user codes.

Adding a Code

Enter the following command:

[Master Code] + [8] + [Code Number] + [Desired Code]

The panel will beep to confirm success. Remember that [03] thru [08] can be entered for the Code Number.

Deleting a Code

Only codes [03] thru [08] can be deleted. Codes 01 and 02 are for the Installer Code and the Master Code respectively, and they cannot be deleted from the system. Enter the following command:

[Master Code] + [8] + [Code Number]

The panel will beep to confirm that the code has been deleted.

Editing a Code

Codes cannot be truly edited. Instead, a code must be deleted, and then re-added with a new entry. Start by deleting the code:

[Master Code] + [8] + [Code Number]

Then add the new code:

[Master Code] + [8] + [Code Number] + [Desired Code]

The panel will beep to confirm the code has been added.

Change the Master Code

This process is the mostly same as adding a new code. Note that the Master Code is assigned slot 02. Enter the following command:

[Master Code] + [8] + [02] + [Desired Master Code] + [Desired Master Code Again]

The panel will beep three times after a Master Code change.

Conclusion

We hope that this guide has been informative for you in learning all about codes of Honeywell Systems. In future, we hope to expand this guide to include the commercial polling loop VISTA Systems as well. If you have any questions, please reach out to us at support@alarmgrid.com, or call us at (888) 818-7728 from 9am to 8pm EST M-F.

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With Total connect 2.0's December update, Honeywell continues to take both end-user and dealer feedback seriously to improve the platform. In this release, there are improvements in loading speed, multiple changes to the way panel and Total Connect users are handled, as well as the reintroduction of the Night Stay Arming option in both Lyric and Lynx panels, and the addition of Custom Arming in the Lyric panels.

Here's the splash screen for the December update. It outlines all the updates and improvements included with this release. This screen will come up when you first log in to the website after the update, but you can always access it from the About Screen in TC2 by following the "What's New in this app" link. This is also where you can provide feedback directly to Honeywell regarding the page.
What's New Splash Screen

The user administration section is now more streamlined, allowing you to view current or all location's users, as well as add users to any or all locations, for multi-location accounts, from a single screen. The process of adding a user is now menu driven, making it much simpler

New Menu Driven User EditingAdd User Prompts

In the security screen, on Lyric and Lynx Touch panels, you now have the option to Arm Night Stay, if there are any interior zones on your system programmed with Night Stay enabled. On Lyric panels, you also have the option to choose Arm custom. When you do, you'll be presented with a screen showing all available zones. Any zones you select with a check mark will automatically be bypassed, with the rest being armed. Security Screen with Night Stay and Arm Custom
You can choose whether or not you want the system to provide you with an Entry Delay, once armed. The panel will always provide an Exit Delay. Keep in mind that even though you may be bypassing all motion detectors, the panel considers this an "Away" arming, and will sound the Exit Delay beeps, if enabled. The panel does know the difference between arming via Total Connect 2.0, and arming via the keypad, so Auto Stay arming logic will not apply in this situation, as it would if you custom armed through the Lyric panel itself.
Arm Custom

Notification edits are now much easier to perform, and can be done directly from the Notification List page. You can still toggle a notification on or off quickly and easily, but you can also add a new notification Group from a drop down menu, and you can click on the name of the Notification Event to access an Edit screen, where you can change the name of the notification, shown as the subject of the notification message when it's received, add additional groups, then set those groups to also receive this notification, and so on. The Save option will only be available if information is changed on this screen.Edit Notification

I'm glad to see Honeywell is taking input from both dealers and end-users seriously, and I look forward to seeing more improvements in the future. What do you think about the new features and improvements to Total Connect 2.0? What other changes would you like to see? Let us know in the comments section!

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There are two ways of viewing video from a Honeywell Total Connect 2.0 Camera.

Honeywell has released its own wireless, WIFI enabled, ip cameras. They are called IPCAMs and come in a variety of models for different applications. Honeywell currently offers three models of their IPCAMS. The IPCAM-WL is an indoor, low light camera. The IPCAM-PT2 is a pan-tilt camera that can be manipulated remotely through Total Connect 2.0, a WIFI enabled Lynx Touch or Lyric panel. The IPCAM-WO is a rugged camera that’s rated for outdoor use. All of the cameras are able to communicate over WIFI. IPCAMs can be used as standalone devices with or without an alarm system; their communication goes straight to the internet. IPCAMs also have an Ethernet jack on the back of the unit to be able to connect to a hardwired network.

There are three ways to connect IPCAMs to an IP network. The easiest method to connect is to use the WPS function. First, WPS needs to be enabled at the router supplying the WIFI network. Typically this can be done by pressing a dedicated button on the outside of the unit or by enabling WPS through the router’s web enabled GUI. After enabling WPS at the router press the WPS button on the back of the camera. The camera will automatically connect and configure itself to the WIFI network. For customers whose router doesn’t support WPS, Honeywell has released a device called the WAP that connects IPCAMs to the WIFI network using WPS. This device connects to the local router with a patch cord and has its own WPS button. With the WAP connected via Ethernet to the router, enabling WPS through the WAP and to the IPCAM allows the IPCAM to connect to the WIFI network. Lastly, in the event that WIFI isn’t going to be used, the cameras can simply be plugged into an Ethernet network with a patch cable.

IPCAMs are able to be viewed live at a Lyric panel or Lynx Touch panel that has a WIFI module installed, as long as the panel and IPCAMs are on the same WIFI network. The L5210 is able to view 2 cameras simultaneously where the L7000 and Lyric can view up to 4 cameras. IPCAMs live streams can also be viewed through the Total Connect 2.0 app. In addition to being able to view live streams, users can also configure IPCAMs to automatically record 10 second clips when a motion event occurs within their view. Up to 500 clips save to the cloud and can be watched, exported, downloaded and deleted through Total Connect 2.0. Users can also select email addresses to have motion events sent to as soon as a video event is captured.

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While the Honeywell L5000 and L5100 are very different security systems, they look almost identical. Luckily, Honeywell left a few distinguishing marks that makes it very simple to be able to tell the difference. 

The fastest way to identify the two systems is by simply looking at the buttons below the screen. If they have words written on them, then you have an L5000. If they are only icons, then you have something newer. It's also worth noting that the area surrounding the screen is going to be tan on a Honeywell L5000. This is the same color that can be found on early revisions of the l5100. But if you see a tan colored area surrounding the screen, you can be certain that the panel is either an L5000 or an L5100.

While the L5000 is crippled in some ways, the L5100 was not flash upgradeable (not like the new panels) which means that when Honeywell would update the system with new functionality, the newer versions would be able to do things that the older ones could not. For example, a later revision L5100 was able to open a garage door opening while the older was not. As a result of the non-upgradeability of the panel left many users in the lurch as they were not able to access many of the functions they were hoping would be added to the L5100.

If you are concerned about which L5100 panel you have the identification is very easy.

If you can be certain that you do not have an L5000, knowing which approximate revision you have of the L5100 is as easy as looking at that plate I mentioned earlier. If the area surrounding the screen is tan, then you have an early L5100. If it is as white as the driven snow and there are 4 buttons below the screen (4... because 2 buttons signifies a different system), then you have a newer L5100 and it can be used to open and close your garage door.

The L5200 is the newest arrival in the Honeywell line. Having been just released, this security system is the most state-of-the-art ever created. 

While an L5100 has four buttons right below the screen, the L5200 features only two small rubber buttons. The rest of the features have been integrated into the touchscreen. The chances of the system you're trying to identify being an L5200 are pretty slim since it just came out. That said, it's worth having a look at. The L5200 will be the same size as the L5100, and it's hardware performs much of the same functions.

All of that said, the l5200 is not the only new system with two buttons. If your system has two buttons, you may also have the L7000, which isn't very much different from the L5200 in its functionality, but it is the bigger and better of the two panels.

Again, the fastest way to identify these units is by their buttons. If the Honeywell security system sitting on your wall has only two buttons, these are the only two systems they could be. If the buttons are made of rubber, and the system looks just like the L5100, then it is most likely an L5200. If the screen is much bigger, and the buttons are made of plastic, then the system is an L7000.

The big advantage of these panels over the older ones is their customizability. For example, a user can now edit the chimes that sound when a door is opened.

Moreover a user can easily upgrade the panel to the newest revision.

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