Training Posts

Posted By

Hi DIYers! We've heard many reports that end users were having a tough time auto-enrolling their DSC PowerG Wireless Sensors with their Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus Systems. After doing some of our own research, we've found that it is possible. In this quick and easy post, we will show you how.

PowerG Sensors are somewhat unique because they don't learn-in with an IQ Panel 2 Plus by removing a tamper cover or by faulting the sensor. Each PowerG device actually has an enrollment button that is used for enrollment. But even then, this button isn't just simply pressed and held. It has to be activated in a very specific manner for the sensor to learn in.

First, you must locate the enrollment button on the PowerG Sensor. The location of this button can vary greatly between different pieces of equipment. For a key fob or panic button, the enrollment button is usually one of the primary inputs. But another sensor may have its enrollment button on its main board or beneath the battery cover. We recommend referring to the sensor's Installation manual for more information on where this button is located.

The picture below shows the enrollment button on a DSC PG9944 Outdoor Motion Sensor. Notice how it is underneath the back cover next to the batteries.


Please keep in mind that the location of this button will vary between different sensors. Once you have located the button, put the IQ Panel 2 Plus System into its auto-enrollment mode like you would for any other sensor. You can access this mode by pressing the small grey bar at the top of the screen and choosing Settings > Advanced Settings > Installer Code (default 1111) > Installation > Devices > Security Sensors > Auto Learn Sensor.

From there, press and hold the enrollment button on the sensor. An LED light on the sensor should appear and then disappear. Keep holding down the button, and do not let it go. After a brief moment, the LED light should appear a second time. Release the button while the light is still illuminated in this second cycle. If performed successfully, the sensor should transmit a signal to the IQ Panel 2 Plus. The system should recognize the signal and learn-in the sensor. You can then proceed to adjust the programming settings for the zone.

We feel this helpful tip should make it easier for end users to enroll their PowerG Sensors without additional assistance. Remember, this is only for Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus Systems that have a PowerG daughtercard installed and operating properly. If you're a monitored customer with additional questions, please reach out to us by emailing support@alarmgrid.com, or call us at (888) 818-7728 during our normal business hours of 9am to 8pm EST M-F. We look forward to helping you!

Tags: , , , , , ,

Comments


Posted By

Hi DIYers! We're hitting you with a video recap, this time covering January 28th thru February 7th. It has been a couple of weeks since we have last done this, so we have many new videos this time. Your boys Joe, Jorge and Jarrett are all back and ready to help you learn to use your system!

Using the Qolsys IQ Siren with a 2GIG Alarm System

Jorge shows users how to use the Qolsys IQ Siren with a 2GIG GC3 Alarm System. This Z-Wave siren produces sounds of up to 105 dB, and it features a built-in strobe light to provide a visual indication of an alarm. It also has an integrated backup battery so that it will work even when the power is out. This is an easy-to-use siren that is great for boosting the volume of a 2GIG Security System, as well as many other alarm control panels that work with Z-Wave.


Disabling Auto-Stay on a Honeywell LYNX Touch

Chipper Alarm Grid Team Member Jarrett demonstrates how to disable the auto-stay arming feature when using a Honeywell LYNX Touch Alarm System. Auto-Stay Arming has the system automatically revert to Arm Stay Mode when Arming Away if no entry/exit zone is activated during the exit delay countdown. If you want to put your LYNX Touch System into Arm Away Mode, you must either disable this feature or open and close an entry/exit sensor during the exit delay countdown.


Why Can't I Use Z-Wave Security Sensors With My Alarm System?

Jorge talks about how Z-Wave security sensors cannot be used with security systems supported by Alarm Grid. Z-Wave technology is great for use with smart home automation, and we have many systems that support Z-Wave lights, locks and thermostats. However, the Z-Wave communication protocol still isn't considered to be reliable and consistent enough to support security applications. For that reason, most alarm system manufacturers specifically design their security panels so that they cannot use or support Z-Wave security devices.


Changing the Master Code Using the Installer Code on a Honeywell Lyric

Jarrett walks users through the process of changing the Master Code by using the Installer Code on a Honeywell Lyric Alarm System. From the Installer Tools Menu, there is an option for resetting the Master Code back to its default of 1234. The user can then use the default Master Code to access the Users Menu and change the Master Code to a different four-digit code of their choosing. The Installer Tools Menu should be easy to access with the system disarmed since most users keep their Installer Code at the default of 4112.


Using the Smart Areas Feature on the 2GIG GC3

Jorge demonstrates the Smart Areas feature on a 2GIG GC3 Alarm System. This feature allows the system to support partitioning. In this case, the partitions are referred to as "Smart Areas". The system will support four distinct Smart Areas after the feature has been enabled from within system programming. After enabling the feature, a Smart Areas menu option will appear on the main system screen. Please note that your GC3 System must be running firmware version 3.2 or higher to support the feature.


Streaming Alarm.com Cameras to the Qolsys IQ Panel 2

Joe shows users how they can stream Alarm.com Security Cameras directly to their Qolsys IQ Panel 2 System. This feature is only compatible with certain ADC Camera models. You will need to enable the feature within Alarm.com for this to work. In addition to streaming video, some camera models will also allow your to stream live audio on the panel as well. Please note that your IQ Panel 2 System will need to be running firmware version 2.2.1 or higher to support this feature.


How to Safely Remove an iControl from an Existing System

Joe walks users through the proper procedure for removing an iControl module from a Honeywell VISTA Panel. There have been many users who have removed iControl modules from their systems, only to find out later that their keypads do not function properly. This can be prevented by following the correct steps when removing an iControl device. The proper procedure involves powering down the VISTA System before removing and reconnecting the keypad cable to the ECP bus afterwards.


Is Monitoring Required to Use Home Automation with the Interlogix Simon XTi-XTi-5

Jorge talks about how alarm monitoring service is required to use smart home automation with an Interlogix Simon XTi or Simon XTi-5 Alarm System. The reason that these systems require alarm monitoring for home automation is because the Alarm.com Cellular Communicator is actually also the Z-Wave controller. The cellular communicator must be installed and activated with Alarm.com for Z-Wave functionality to work on the system. A user can then control their Z-Wave devices from the panel or through the Alarm.com website or mobile app.


Finding the Serial Number on a Honeywell 5800PIR-RES

Jorge mentions the possible ways to find the Serial Number on a Honeywell 5800PIR-RES Motion Sensor. The easiest option is to check a sticker on the back of the sensor that lists the Serial Number. If the sticker has been removed, you can also auto-enroll it to the panel. The Serial Number will be displayed on the screen after you have learned it in. This can also be useful for confirming that the Serial Number on the sticker is correct.


Honeywell Panels Compatible With the SEM

Jorge explains which of the Honeywell Panels will work with an Alarm.com System Enhancement Module (SEM). An SEM is a cellular communicator that allows a Honeywell System to work with the Alarm.com service. This is rather unique because Honeywell Systems would normally work with Total Connect 2.0 instead. The SEM devices will work with any of the lower VISTA P-Series Panels, as well as their First Alert equivalents. These modules also include built-in Z-Wave controllers for smart home functionality.


Updating the Firmware on a Vista-P Alarm System

Joe covers the process for updating the firmware on a Honeywell VISTA Series System. This is done by replacing the PROM chip. The PROM chip can be identified as a small black chip on the system board. Upgrading to a new one can be necessary for unlocking certain features. You should always make sure to power down the system entirely whenever you are replacing the PROM chip. Alarm Grid sells VISTA-15P PROM Chips, VISTA-20P PROM Chips and VISTA-21iP PROM Chips.


Bonus: Alarm Grid Intro Video

Okay, so this isn't really a video to help you use a security system. But it is a nifty introduction montage that our video team put together. Many of the Alarm Grid techs and employees are featured, including Jorge, Jarrett, Joe, Dylan and Bryce. I even make a brief appearance! We're very proud to have helped many people get the most out of their security systems. If you're a monitored customers and you ever need further help, please reach out to us by emailing support@alarmgrid.com. Also make sure to like us on YouTube, and subscribe for further updates!

Tags: , , ,

Comments


Posted By

Hi DIYers! Today, we're taking a look at why one-go-all-go smoke detectors can help ensure that everyone in the building is alerted during a fire. Simply put, a one-go-all-go smoke detector will cause all of the other compatible smoke detectors on the system to activate at the same time.

Dsc fsb 210bt 2 wire addressable photoelectric smoke and heat de

Having all the smokes in your home activate at the same time can be crucial for ensuring that everyone is alerted in the event of a fire. This is especially true for larger homes that need several smoke detectors for complete coverage. Most alarm systems can have some type of interconnected one-go-all-go smoke detector network. However, implementing this feature properly can be difficult, and it requires additional equipment and wiring. Another important thing to remember is that the one-go-all-go feature is best achieved by using the same detector model across the network.

For those with wired alarm control panels, there is often a way to achieve a one-go-all-go setup using hardwired smokes. This is possible with both 2-wire smokes and 4-wire smokes, but both require the proper equipment. Many wired panels offer a way to conveniently reset the zone used for 2-wire smokes after a fire alarm has been cleared. This is necessary for getting the smoke detectors to stop sounding and to reset the detector so that it can trip again, if necessary.

For the Honeywell VISTA Panels, all 2-wire smokes must go on zone 1. This zone will automatically reset, and power will be briefly dropped to the smokes after the alarm is cleared. Multiple 2-wire smokes are wired together in parallel, with an end of line resistor (EOLR) for wiring supervision. A good 2-wire smoke detector to use is the System Sensor 2WTA-B, which also includes a built-in sounder.

System sensor 2wta b 2 wire smoke detector with fixed heat and s

Unlike 2-wire smokes, 4-wire smokes have less restriction regarding where they can be wired. In fact, a 4-wire smoke on a Honeywell VISTA System will generally go on any hardwired zone, except for zone 1. Again, the smokes can be configured for a one-go-all-go setup, but this will require additional equipment and wiring. This also allows the smokes to take up fewer systems zones, as they can all use the same zone and programming settings.

One downside to using 4-wire smokes is that they often require additional resources to work properly. In order to get a 4-wire smoke to stop sounding, power to the device must be dropped. But unless the system has a built-in relay, this cannot be done without additional hardware. This can require an external relay, and possibly an additional power supply as well. Proper operation will also require an end-of-line power supervision relay to check whether or not power to the smokes has been interrupted. If you do decide to go the 4-wire route, the System Sensor 4WTA-B is a good option.

System sensor 4wt b 4 wire smoke detector with fixed heat sensor

More recently, certain wireless smoke detectors also offer one-go-all-go functionality. Honeywell really took the initiative here by making their Lyric SiXSMOKE Sensor a one-go-all-go device. This sensor is exclusively compatible with the Honeywell Lyric Alarm System, and provides a very easy way to achieve a robust one-go-all-go setup. One-go-all-go is also compatible with the new Honeywell SiXCOMBO, which also offers heat and CO detection.

Honeywell sixsmoke wireless smoke slash heat detector for lyric

If you have a different wireless system than the Lyric, then there might still be way to attain a one-go-all-go setup. In most cases, this will require using 4-wire smokes with a compatible wireless transmitter. The transmitter will need to be able to support Normally Open (NO) life-safety devices with an end of line resistor. However, this is not possible for every wired-to-wireless converter.

Additionally the standard equipment for any 4-wire smoke is also required. This includes a relay, power supply and resistor. One transmitter that will work for this application is the Honeywell 5817CBXT. This module is part of the Honeywell 5800 Series, and it will work with nearly any alarm system that accepts the 345 MHz wireless frequency. Remember, the transmitter or converter must communicate at a frequency accepted by the alarm control panel.

Honeywell 5817cb wireless commercial sensor

Additionally, Qolsys recently released the Qolsys IQ Hardwire 16-F for 319.5 MHz systems. This is a 16-zone wired to wireless converter that is great for bringing over hardwired sensors to a newer wireless system. Zone 16 on the module is a Normally Open loop specifically designed for 2-wire smokes. The loop will support up to ten 2-wire smoke devices, which are wired in parallel with an end-of-line resistor. This revolutionary module represents the first way to bring 2-wire smokes over to a wireless all-in-one system. The necessary resistors come included with the module.

Qolsys iq hardwire 16 s qs7131 840

Additionally, if you have an existing network of high-voltage smokes, you can integrate them into a wireless system using a takeover module. These are devices that listen for the unique temporal sound of an activated smoke detector. If the existing smoke detector network is one-go-all-go, a single takeover module can accommodate the entire network. Alarm Grid offers takeover modules that operate at the 319.5 MHz (Interlogix/GE and Qolsys), 345 MHz (Honeywell and 2GIG) and 433 MHz (DSC) wireless frequencies. That way, you can conveniently take an exiting high-voltage smoke network and start using it with your new wireless security system!

If you need help choosing smoke detectors for a one-go-all-go setup, please don't hesitate to reach out to us! We can help you determine the perfect fire-protection devices for your security system. You can send an email to support@alarmgrid.com, or you can call us at (888) 818-7728 during our normal business hours of 9am to 8pm EST M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Comments


Posted By

Hi DIYers! Its time for another Alarm Grid video recap. This time, we're covering the videos released from January 15th thru 25th. We have 10 new videos this time from Joe, Jorge and Jarrett. Check out our newest support videos, as we help you learn how to use your security system!

Adding a Siren to My LYNX Touch Panel Using The 5800RL

Joe shows users how to add a hardwired siren to a Honeywell LYNX Touch System by using the Alarm Grid LYNX-EXT Kit. This kit is built around the Honeywell 5800RL Wireless Relay, which allows the hardwired siren to communicate with the panel wirelessly. The kit includes everything a user needs, except for the actual siren and any necessary wiring. The kit is compatible with the LYNX Touch Systems, as well as the Honeywell VISTA Series Panels.


Using the SiX Programming Feature on a Honeywell Lyric

Jorge demonstrates the SiX Programming Feature used with a Honeywell Lyric Security System. This feature allows users to quickly and conveniently batch enroll Honeywell SiX Series Sensors with the Honeywell Lyric. All the user has to do is put the Lyric System into its SiX Programming Mode and power on the sensor to auto-enroll it. From there, the sensor's settings can be configured. If the sensor is new, then you can power it on by releasing the battery tab.


Making a Honeywell Panel Work With Alarm.com

Jorge talks about how some Honeywell Alarm Control Panels can be set up to work with the Alarm.com Platform. The only only Honeywell Panels that can do this are the Honeywell VISTA Series Panel. This is accomplished by adding an Alarm.com System Enhancement Module to the VISTA Panel. This module also doubles as a cellular communicator for the system. A good SEM for a VISTA System is the ADC-SEM110-VT-VZ. This communicator works with the Verizon LTE Network.


Disabling Auto-Stay Arming on a 2GIG GC3

Jarret goes through the process of disabling the Auto-Stay Arming feature on a 2GIG GC3 System. With Auto-Stay Arming enabled, the system will revert Arm Stay Mode when Arming Away if no entry exit zone is activated during the exit delay period. If a user wants to set their GC3 System to Arm Away Mode, they must either activate an entry/exit zone during the exit delay period or disable this option from within system programming.


Disabling Auto-Stay Arming on a 2GIG GC2

Jorge demonstrates how to disable Auto-Stay Arming on a 2GIG GC2 System. There are many cases where a user needs to set their system to Arm Away Mode to test their interior sensors. But a user might experience confusion when their system goes to Arm Stay Mode instead. The reason this is happening is because Auto-Stay Arming is enabled within system programming, and they are not faulting an entry/exit zone during the exit delay period.


Adding a Siren to My Lynx Touch Panel Using the Lynx-WEXT

Joe shows users how to add a hardwired siren to a LYNX Touch using the Alarm Grid LYNX-WEXT Kit. Unlike the LYNX-EXT Kit, which uses a wireless power relay, the LYNX-WEXT Kit provides a hardwired relay that connects with the panel through a physical connection. When an alarm occurs, the relay will direct power to the siren to have it activate. The relay will then cut siren power once the alarm is cleared to get it to stop sounding.


Disabling Auto-Stay Arming on a Honeywell Vista

Jorge demonstrates how a user can disable Auto-Stay Arming on a Honeywell VISTA Security System. This option is found from within panel programming. A user will need to enter programming using the system's Installer Code and provide the appropriate programming field. The default Installer Code is 4112. Once the Auto-Stay Arming option has been disabled, a user will be able to set the system to Arm Away Mode without having to activate an entry/exit zone.


Disabling Auto-Stay Arming on a Honeywell Lyric

Jarrett shows users how to disable Auto-Stay Arming on a Honeywell Lyric Controller. The purpose of the Auto-Stay Arming feature is to prevent false alarms when a user sets their system to Arm Away. If a user arms their system Away, but they don't activate an entry/exit zone, then it can be logically assumed that the user is still inside the building. In that case, it is very likely that user will activate an interior sensor and cause a false alarm. Auto-Stay Arming prevents this from occurring.


Creating an Automation in Apple HomeKit

Jorge shows the process for creating an Automation in Apple HomeKit. This is very important for Honeywell Lyric Security System users who want to have HomeKit Scenes activate when they perform certain functions on their panel. For example, a user might want to have a specific HomeKit device activate whenever they Arm their security system. The only way to do this is to create an action-based Automation in HomeKit and set the Lyric as the trigger.


Disabling Auto-Stay Arming on a Qolsys IQ Panel 2

Jarret walks users through the process of disabling Auto-Stay Arming on a Qolsys IQ Panel 2. Normally, a user would want to keep Auto-Stay Arming enabled so that a user does not accidentally cause a false alarm by setting their system to Arm Away when they meant to choose Arm Stay. But disabling Auto-Stay Arming can be very useful when testing, as the user will not have to open and close an entry/exit zone whenever they go to Arm Away.

Tags: , ,

Comments


Posted By

Hi DIYers! We know that many users take on the task of setting up their own hardwired security system. We think this is great, as it really lets a DIY user get to know their alarm panel. But there are some extra tools we recommend for setting up a wired system. One of which is a voltmeter.

Honeywell vista 20p wired alarm control panel

All alarm systems require electricity for basic operation. But this electricity is used for more than just powering the panel. Various equipment like sensors and keypads will also require power. With hardwired systems, the peripheral equipment will actually draw power from the panel. Not only is the system's plug-in transformer powering the panel, it is also keeping its many devices running as well. If the electricity goes out, the panel should also have a backup battery to ensure that everything remains powered.

The important thing to understand is that plugging in a transformer does not suddenly supply an infinite amount of electricity for an alarm system. There's a limit to how much power a system can provide. Each transformer can only provide a limited amount of current. There are also current limiting devices like fuses and breakers that are built into each of the output circuits on a system. These are used to prevent things like the bell circuit, the battery charging circuit and the auxiliary power circuit from allowing enough current through to damage the system. If you try to add too many devices to a system, you may find that they will not work properly. Worse yet, if you don't use the specified transformer and other manufacturer-specified peripheral devices, you could cause serious damage to the system.

For smaller applications, this is not usually a major concern. But as you add more powered devices to an alarm system, the chance for overload becomes greater. You may need to add a second power supply, along with an additional transformer and battery. However, you shouldn't be working blindly. Using a voltmeter with the ability to read current (technically a multi-meter) is very important for knowing the current load and making sure that the current power supply is adequate.

A voltmeter works by applying a known amount of current and resistance to a circuit. Ohm's Law tells us that if you know any two of three values (voltage, current or resistance), you can then calculate the third value. A hardwired zone on an alarm panel works largely in the same way. Voltage, along with a small amount of current, is fed through a zone circuit. Based on the Ohm's Law principle, if you know the amount of voltage being applied, and you know the amount of current being applied, you can then calculate the amount of resistance that is present on the circuit. This is how a zone with an end-of-line resistor works. When you make a zone Normally Open or Normally Closed, you simplify things even further. If current is flowing, the zone is open. If current is not flowing, the zone is shorted or closed. Without a voltmeter, troubleshooting wired zones becomes much more difficult. The voltmeter doesn't even have to be a big expensive model. It just needs to provide basic function.

Also keep in mind that many system problems occur due to electrical issues. Having a voltmeter on hand can save a user a lot of hassle in troubleshooting. We hear of users all the time who don't know why their system isn't working, only to find that it is because they aren't supplying enough power. Performing a simple check with a voltmeter can help you discover an issue that would otherwise have gone unnoticed. For that reason, everyone with a wired panel really should invest in an inexpensive voltmeter or multi-meter.

If you're just beginning to consider purchasing a panel, and you don't want the hassle of worrying about wired zones, then a wireless system may be a better option. Wireless sensors operate strictly on battery power, and a user won't have to worry about overloading circuits. We generally recommend wireless systems for DIY users in general, as they are much easier to use and install. But if you do decide to go the hardwired route, or you already have a working wired system, we certainly recommend you keep a voltmeter on hand!

If you're an Alarm Grid customer, and you need help using a voltmeter to check your system, don't hesitate to reach out to us! We are happy to help monitored customers get their systems up and running and perform any necessary troubleshooting. We invite you to check out our monitoring page for more information. If you ever need help, you can send an email to support@alarmgrid.com. You may also call us at (888) 818-7728 during our normal business hours of 9am to 8pm EST M-F. We look forward to working with you!

Ag indoor security stickers window stickers with adhesive front

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Comments


Posted By

Hi DIYers! It was a productive week for our video team, as several new videos were released. We figured we would get you caught up with a quick video recap for the week. Most of the week's videos feature Joe, but Jarrett made an appearance as well. Let's check out our newest videos:

Enrolling the 2GIG SP2 in Access Point Mode

Joe shows how users can pair a 2GIG SP2 Touchscreen Keypad with a 2GIG GC3 Alarm System. The SP2 Keypad is normally paired with the GC3 System through a WIFI connection. But if the WIFI is weak or the building does not have WIFI, then it may be better to use Access Point Mode. The Access Point must be enabled, and the SP2 will connect to the associated SSID. Just remember that using the GC3 Access Point will disable WIFI communication for the system.


FireFighter Product Overview

Joe teaches users about the Encore FireFighter Takeover Modules. These devices allow existing hardwired or conventional life-safety sensors to work with wireless security systems. They work by listening for the unique temporal sound of an activated smoke detector or carbon monoxide sensor. Once it detects this sound, the sensor will send a wireless alert to the panel to let it know about the emergency. There is a 319.5 MHz version, a 345 MHz version, and 433 MHz version of the FireFighter Module. The user must choose the one that is compatible with their system.


Which Sensors Are Compatible with the Simon Series?

Joe explains which wireless sensors will work with an Interlogix Simon Series System. Each Simon Panel has a built-in 319.5 MHz wireless receiver for supporting compatible sensors. Some of the sensors that operate at the 319.5 MHz frequency include those from Interlogix/GE and Qolsys. These 319.5 MHz wireless sensors can be learned-in by putting the system into its wireless enrollment mode and then activating the tamper cover on the wireless sensor to have it auto-enrolled.


Is There an AUI Keypad For The Lyric Security System?

Jarrett outlines the keypad options for a Honeywell Lyric Security System. The only official keypad for the Lyric is the Honeywell LKP500. However, the LKP is not an AUI keypad, as it does not feature an Advanced User Interface in the form of a touchscreen. But a user can use an Android Tablet or iPad and the Honeywell My Home Controller App to serve as an AUI touchscreen keypad. Additionally, the Lyric Panel itself is technically an AUI controller since it includes a touchscreen.


Setting Up The 5800C2W with a Lyric Controller

Joe demonstrates how to set up a Honeywell 5800C2W Wired to Wireless Converter with a Honeywell Lyric Controller. The 5800C2W is a converter module that allows hardwired sensors to be used with a compatible wireless alarm system. The wired sensors will connect directly with the 5800C2W, and the module will send a wireless 345 MHz signal to the Lyric Security System. All of the wired sensors can then be learned in using the wireless system zones.


How To Safely Remove an iControl from an Existing System

Joe shows users the correct process for removing an iControl module from a Honeywell VISTA Alarm System. Many users try to remove iControl modules from their Honeywell VISTA Panels, only to find that their keypads would not work properly afterwards. Following the correct steps when removing the iControl device can prevent this from happening. The VISTA System must be powered down when doing this. The keypad cable must be reconnected to the ECP bus after removing the module.


Explaining A Trouble Condition On A 5800C2W Zone

Joe explains how trouble conditions work on a Honeywell 5800C2W Wired to Wireless Converter. Users should remember the 5800C2W trouble conditions appear on the lowest calibrated zone for the device. In other words, just because the trouble appears on the lowest calibrated zone doesn't mean that the zone itself is the cause. For example, if the 5800C2W module itself experiences a tamper, then the trouble will still appear on the lowest calibrated zone. The 5800C2W also features LED lights that can be used to diagnose trouble conditions.

Tags: , ,

Comments


Posted By

Hi DIYers! You may have heard the term "Dual Tec Motion Sensor" being tossed around at some point or another. The term refers to motion detecting sensors that use two forms of detection for picking up movement. Usually, these two methods are passive infrared sensing and microwave detection.

Honeywell 5898 wireless dual tec motion detector

A common complaint with motion sensors is that they are known to cause false alarms when mounted improperly. This is usually caused by having the motion sensor placed near a window, a ceiling fan or an air vent. The motions that cause these false alarms are usually PIR-exclusive sensors that use only one method for detecting motion. Now, these sensors will generally work very well and won't cause any false alarms when mounted properly.

The reality is that most false alarms caused by motion sensors are the result of poor mounting. But having a second detection method for verification can go a long way towards preventing any system false alarms. Although proper mounting is still very important, you might be able to save yourself some major inconvenience by springing for a more-advanced motion detection sensor. This is where Dual Tec Motions can come into play.

Honeywell Dual Tec Motion Sensors use passive infrared (PIR) detection and microwave detection when looking for movement. In order for one of these devices to activate and alert the alarm control panel, both the PIR sensor and the microwave sensor must activate. Nothing will happen if only one part of the sensors is triggered. This can be very useful if a single technology sensor is prone to randomly activating due to local environmental sources. The name "Dual Tec" comes from the fact that the sensors use two technologies in detecting motion.

The PIR sensor in a Dual Tec Motion will work by looking for changes in infrared (IR) energy that occur with movement. Every person, animal and object gives off some amount of IR energy. If a large mass of IR energy from a person or large object moves within the field of view of the PIR sensor, then it will signal that motion is present. Meanwhile, the microwave sensor will send out continuous signals that are designed to bounce off of objects and return to the sensor at a consistent rate. If the signal pattern changes, then the sensor will assume that motion is present.

Although a PIR sensor can technically work by itself, a microwave motion sensor would cause too many false alarms on its own. This is because microwave signals can pass through objects and walls, and they could very easily detect movement that occurs outside the building. But the PIR sensor will not work through walls, so it will only detect motion that occurs from the inside.

However, pairing a PIR sensor with a microwave sensor in a Dual Tec Motion Sensor results in the perfect team. Even if the PIR sensor responds to flowing air or sunlight or some other local change in IR energy, the microwave sensor will keep it in check. Likewise, the PIR sensor will not respond to the outside movement that may trigger the microwave sensor. But both sensors will still respond very reliably to any real motion that is actually present in the building. And once that happens, it's game over for any intruders!

Honeywell offers Dual Tec Motion Sensors of all types. Their Dual Tec lineup includes wireless motion sensors like the Honeywell 5898, as well as wired motion sensors like the Honeywell DT8035. There's even a long range Dual Tec Motion, the Honeywell DT906, that is perfect for large commercial settings that require the highest level of protection possible. Honeywell has truly covered all their bases here!

Honeywell dt906 dual tec long range motion detectorYou can get all of these great Honeywell Dual Tec Motion Detecting Sensors from the Alarm Grid website. If you need help deciding on a perfect motion detector, please reach out to us by emailing support@alarmgrid.com, or by calling us at (888) 818-7728 during our normal business hours of 9am to 8pm EST M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Comments


Posted By

Hi DIYers! Today, we're taking a close look at the Honeywell SiXPIR Lyric Smart Motion Sensor and all of the great features it offers. The wireless encrypted sensor was designed exclusively with the Honeywell Lyric Alarm System in mind, and it works exclusively with that security panel.

Honeywell sixpir lyric smart sensor motion

The Honeywell SiXPIR is perfect for any Lyric user looking for an effective residential motion sensor. It offers a coverage area of 40 feet by 56 feet, which is great for monitoring a living room, basement, hallway, office or other restricted area. This max coverage area can be easily achieved by mounting the sensor from a recommended height of 7.5 feet high. The sensor also offers a convenient walk test mode that features a red LED light whenever motion is detected. This is great for ensuring that you have mounted the sensor in a good location. The Lyric System includes an option within programming to initiate the walk test at any time.

Pet-owner will love the fact that the SiXPIR includes pet immunity for small animals weighing up to 80 pounds. Again, mounting the sensor from a proper height and angle is important for this feature to function properly. With pet immunity, small animals will walk underneath the detection pattern of the sensor. However, a human walking upright will still cause a change in infrared (IR) energy that sets off the sensor. Users should make sure though that their pets cannot get in the field of view (FOV) of the sensor by climbing up the stairs or on top of the furniture. The sensor should also not be placed in view of active vents or ceiling fans that could cause false alarms.

Remember, the SiXPIR is designed exclusively with the Lyric System in mind. Users of older Honeywell Panels can achieve great results with the Honeywell 5800PIR-RES, which provided much inspiration for the SiXPIR Sensor. But only the SiXPIR Sensor offers 128-bit AES encryption for added wireless security. The SiXPIR is also a "smart" sensor that knows when it has been programmed to a Lyric System. It will then not be able to be enrolled with a new system unless it is deleted from the old one. The device is powered using a single lithium CR123A battery. In its default setting, the sensor will be enrolled as an interior zone and only remain active when the system is Armed Away. When Armed Stay, the sensor will remain active so that the user can move freely throughout the building.

You can get the Honeywell SiXPIR and the Honeywell 5800PIR-RES Motion Sensors from the Alarm Grid website. They make a great addition for nearly any Honeywell looking to expand upon their current setup. Buy one now to help keep your home safe!

Tags: , , ,

Comments


Posted By

Hi DIYers! We're here with a fast video recap this time, presenting six new videos. Jorge pitched four new videos, while Jarrett and Joe each brought one. This recap is notable though, as it marks the end of 2018. It also shows the first Alarm Grid videos of 2019. Let's check them out!

What Happens On My Lyric Controller When AC Power Goes Out?

Jarrett shows users what happens when the AC power is lost on a Honeywell Lyric Controller. This occurs when the electricity goes out or when the plug-in transformer is disconnected. To stay powered on, the Lyric System will automatically switch over to its battery backup if it is available. Certain system features are affected when this happens. For example, all Z-Wave functionality is lost, and all incoming commands and signals from Total Connect 2.0 will not be received.

2GIG Key2-345 Key Fob - Program to 2GIG GC3

Jorge teaches users how they can program a 2GIG Key2-345 Key Fob with a 2GIG GC3 Security System. This security key fob provides an easy and convenient method for controlling the GC3 System while the user is on-site. There are dedicated buttons for Arming Away, Arming Stay, Disarming and Triggering a System Function. A user can also press and hold the top two buttons to activate an immediate panic alarm. The GC3 System has 32 dedicated key fob slots, but key fob inputs can also be programmed to standard wireless zones if needed.


How Do I Connect a Z-Wave Door Lock to My Qolsys IQ Panel 2?

Jorge demonstrates how to pair a Z-Wave Door Lock with a Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Alarm System. In order to do this, a user should first clear the lock from the network before attempting to pair it. They can then enroll the lock with the system by putting the panel into its Z-Wave inclusion mode and activating the inclusion function on the Z-Wave lock. Since the IQ Panel 2 includes a Z-Wave Plus Controller, a user can enroll a Z-Wave Plus Lock and expect to get the maximum possible range out of the device.


Programming the 5800COMBO to the L7000 Panel

Jorge explains how to program a 5800COMBO with a Honeywell L7000 LYNX Touch Security System. The 5800COMBO offers support for smoke and heat detection, carbon monoxide detection and low-temperature detection. It can also use two additional system zones for supervision and end of product life monitoring. In total, it requires five individual system zones on the L7000. It can be easily programmed by putting the L7000 into its wireless enrollment mode and using the device's testing buttons to learn it in.


Programming the 5800COMBO to the Lyric Controller

Jorge covers the process of programming the 5800COMBO with the Honeywell Lyric Controller. As a member of the Honeywell 5800 Series, the 5800COMBO can be used with the Honeywell Lyric Alarm System in addition to the Honeywell LYNX Touch Panels. However, Honeywell very recently released the Honeywell SiXCOMBO, which was specifically designed with the Lyric Controller in mind. This device features nearly all of the same features as the 5800COMBO, with added wireless security provided from 128-bit AES encryption.

Enrolling the 2GIG SP1 in Access Point Mode

Joe explains how to pair a 2GIG SP1 Wireless Touchscreen Keypad with a 2GIG GC3 Alarm System using the Access Point Mode feature of the GC3. Using the Access Point Mode for pairing is recommended if a building has no WIFI signal or if the WIFI signal is very weak. Keep in mind though that using AP Mode will disable the standard WIFI connectivity for the GC3 System. The SP1 Keypad offers many great features, including the ability to perform local smart home automation.

Tags: , ,

Comments


Posted By

Hi DIYers! We're back with another video recap to help you learn about your security system. Joe and Jorge are back as usual, while Alarm Grid Team Member Jarrett is making his debut. Also, I even made a one-off video just for fun. Don't expect me in the regular video rotation though!

Here are the new Alarm Grid videos for December 6th thru 13th:

How to Switch Partitions on a Honeywell Vista System

Jorge teaches users how they can switch partitions on a Honeywell VISTA Security System. Partitions allow users to separately control a certain section of their alarm system, while the rest of the system remains in its current armed or disarmed state. Each partition can be assigned its own set of access codes to restrict access of any given user to only select portions of the security system. Additionally, Honeywell recently made partitioning control possible through Total Connect 2.0.

Finding the MAC and CRC on a Lyric Security System

Jorge shows users how they can the MAC address and CRC code on a Honeywell Lyric Alarm System. This information is typically needed to register the system with an alarm monitoring company for monitoring service. The MAC and CRC codes can be found on the box for the system and underneath its back cover on a sticker. However, many users prefer to find the MAC and CRC codes through the system menus. This will require knowing the system's Installer Code, which is 4112 by default.

Changing the Battery in the Qolsys IQ Panel 2

In his much anticipated video debut, Alarm Grid Team Member Jarrett explains how to change the battery for a Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Alarm System. To do this, you must first power down the system by accessing the appropriate menu option. Once the system has powered down completely, it can then be opened up, and the battery can be replaced. The Qolsys IQ2 Battery is designed to last for several years, and it will keep the system powered for up to 24 hours in the event of a power outage.

Using Phone Line Monitoring on an Interlogix Simon XT

Jorge teaches users how they can use phone line monitoring on a Simon XT Security System. Although phone line monitoring is possible, Alarm Grid does not recommend using this type of communication path. Phone line communication is known for being very slow, and it is quite unreliable. Instead, a much better option is to use cellular monitoring service with an Interlogix Simon XT. Cellular service is much faster and more reliable. Cellular connectivity will also allow the system to be used with Alarm.com.

Setting the Siren Timeout on a Simon XTi & XTi-5

Jorge talks about the siren timeout feature on the Simon XTi and Simon XTi-5 Alarm Systems. When an alarm occurs on an wireless Interlogix System, it will begin to produce a siren. The purpose of this siren is to alert those in the building to a serious event, such as a burglary or fire. To stop the siren, the user must disarm the system. However, if the system is not disarmed, the siren will continue to sound until the timeout period elapses. This setting determines how long the siren will last if the system is never disarmed.

Pairing the 2GIG SP1 Keypad with the 2GIG GC3

Joe shows users how to pair the 2GIG SP1 Wireless Keypad with the 2GIG GC3 Security System. The most common way to do this is through a WIFI pairing. The SP1 is a very useful wireless keypad that includes a built-in touchscreen controller. This keypad offers support for voice annunciation, smart home automation control, bypassing zones, producing system chimes and general arming and disarming. It is perfect for placing by secondary entrances in the user's home, such as their back doors, garage doors and basement entrances.

Using Z-Wave with an Interlogix Simon XTi and XTi-5

Joe discusses how it is possible to use Z-Wave smart home devices with a Simon XTi or Simon XTi-5 Alarm System. These systems can support Z-Wave devices once they have been activated with the Alarm.com interactive service. This is because the ADC Cellular Communicator actually doubles as a Z-Wave controller for the system. Once a user has set up a Z-Wave device with the system, it can be operated from the panel or from the Alarm.com website or mobile app.

Can I Use a Qolsys IQ Panel 2 w-o Alarm.com?

Joe explains how the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 can technically be without the Alarm.com service. However, this will severely limit the functionality of the system. By doing this, the system will only serve as a local sound maker and as a fairly limited Z-Wave controller. All versions of the system come with some type of integrated cellular communicator. This module lets the system connect with Alarm.com for remote access and control. This is the only way to use the system with a central station for automatic emergency dispatch.

How Do I Reboot the Qolsys IQ Panel 2

In my first ever Alarm Grid video, I show you how to reboot the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 System. A user might need to reboot their IQ Panel 2 System because they are applying a firmware update. They might also do this because the panel is experiencing problems, and rebooting the system can be a good troubleshooting step. To perform the reboot, the user can select the reboot option in advanced settings. They can also choose to power down the system entirely and then manually power it back on.

Tags: , ,

Comments