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If you have been keeping up with the Alarm Grid blog, then you have likely seen us discussing Alarm.com Doorbell Cameras at some point or another. Today, we're breaking down the three (3) most popular options of doorbell cameras for Alarm.com to help you determine which one is best for you.


The three Alarm.com Doorbell Cameras we will be discussing today include the Alarm.com ADC-VDB770 Video Analytics Doorbell Camera, the SkyBell Slim Line II 720p Doorbell Camera, and the SkyBell Round 1080p WIFI Doorbell Camera. While we can straight away say that the ADC-VDB770 is the premium option here and offers the most impressive features, some users might not need such a loaded device, and they might instead prefer one of the other options. But if you want a quick and dirty answer as to which doorbell camera is the "best", then most security experts are going to steer you towards the ADC-VDB770. Still, there are so many avenues to explore here, that it's really worth looking at the devices from an in-depth perspective.

Before diving into the specifics of each Alarm.com Doorbell Camera, it important to understand one key aspect. Unlike regular Alarm.com Security Cameras, you do not need a true video monitoring service plan to use one single Alarm.com Doorbell Camera device on your Alarm.com account. This is great news for Alarm Grid Gold Plan members with access to Alarm.com, because you can add a single doorbell camera to your account, without having to upgrade your monitoring plan. There are some video "clip limits" to keep in mind, but most users rarely find them to be an issue.

If you go with the Alarm.com ADC-VDB770, you will get 1,200 monthly and 1,200 total clips. For the other doorbell options, it's just 400 monthly and 400 total clips. Most users find 400 to be plenty and they are rarely in danger of reaching their limit. But getting 1,200 clips with the ADC-VDB770 can be a nice bonus. For more information on Alarm.com Clip Limits, please review this FAQ. Please note that if you do use doorbell devices in conjunction with a true video monitoring plan, then each doorbell will count as a full Alarm.com Camera, with its clips counting towards the monthly limit.

One last thing we want to say is that each of the three (3) doorbell cameras we will be discussing today has its own omni-directional microphone, and you will be able to use the device for two-way audio when configured with Alarm.com. This is universal across all three (3) devices, as is getting push notifications to your phone, so we figured we would address that aspect before getting into the individual specifications.

Now, with that out of the way, let's start actually discussing the devices in-depth. We will start with the Alarm.com ADC-VDB770.

If we're looking purely at recording capabilities, the Alarm.com ADC-VDB770 is the clear winner here today, It offers a live recording resolution of up to 1440x1920, though the resolution will often be turned down to prevent any lags or disruptions on a live camera stream due to upload bandwidth requirements. Recorded clips are also available in 1440x1920 resolution. The camera's field of view (FoV) is also quite impressive, at 150° Vertical, 115° Horizontal. It's also the only Alarm.com Doorbell Camera with High Dynamic Range (HDR). Alarm.com also says that it offers "rapid people detection" and a "premium build quality". Infrared (IR) Night Vision ensures that the camera works well in the dark.

But there are a few intangible considerations with the Alarm.com ADC-VDB770 that aren't necessarily factors with the other doorbell cameras shown here. First, the Alarm.com ADC-VDB770 is often marketed for its ability to be used as a "touchless doorbell". You can add on accessories like a "Do Not Touch" Cover, and a "Stand On Mat To Ring Doorbell" Door Mat. It really changes your experience in using and interacting with the device. Of course, you don't have to set up the device this way, you can keep its doorbell button exposed and fully functional. But in the wake of the COVID-19 Pandemic, the need for a "touchless" product makes sense.

The ADC-VDB770 is also the only Alarm.com Doorbell Camera at the time of this writing in March 2021 that supports any form of Alarm.com Video Analytics. To be clear, the ADC-VDB770 is compatible with a very limited form of Video Analytics, in which there can only be one Video Analytics recording rule per device. There can only be one (1) Ground Zone recording rule, and only "People" can be set as the trigger. The camera does not have a motion detector, and you are required to set up Video Analytics to get the camera to function how you want. This is where the "rapid people detection" feature comes from.

One interesting "quirk" for the ADC-VDB770 is that it actually has a noticeably more narrow operating temperature than the other doorbell camera devices we will soon be discussing. For cold weather, the ADC-VDB770 is only safe down to -22°F, unless you obtain the "cold weather collar" accessory (sold separately), which will bring the low-end operating temperature down to -40°F. We've never heard of a "temperature collar" for any security system equipment before, but sure enough, the Alarm.com ADC-VDBA-TC is a real thing. The other doorbell cameras do not have an equivalent "collar". They just work in the colder -40°F without an add-on. Meanwhile, on the other end for "hot" temperatures, the ADC-VDB770 Doorbell Camera is listed at a surprisingly low 104°F. We know that many users live in areas where it regularly gets hotter than that. For that reason, you may want to be a bit wary of the device's operating temperature. Meanwhile, the other two doorbell cameras have "higher" operating temperatures of 122°F and 140°F, respectively. You shouldn't run into many issues there. But 104°F may have you sweating as you wonder if your doorbell camera investment can withstand the heat of a hot summer day.

In our experience, we have seen most customers who get the Alarm.com ADC-VDB770 ultimately have good success setting up the Video Analytics feature, and they are highly satisfied with the device's overall performance. But there are some users out there who simply don't care for the fine-tuning and precision setup that comes with Alarm.com Video Analytics.

These users just want a simple doorbell camera that interfaces nicely with their smartphone. Visitors can press the button to ring the doorbell or it also has a passive infrared motion detector that, if enabled, tells the camera when to start recording because someone has walked into the viewing area. If that is the case for you, then we're sure you will be very happy with one of these two (2) alternative options to the leading ADC-VDB770.

The SkyBell Alarm.com Slim Line II Doorbell Camera, also known as the ADC-VDB105X (Satin Nickel) or ADC-VDB106X (Bronze), certainly makes a compelling argument if you are just wanting something slightly more basic but effective as a doorbell camera. We often see this with Alarm.com equipment. Their premium line is fantastic, but then one step below it they have a more "entry-level" option that is actually quite excellent in its own right. And that's really the case with the SkyBell Slim Line II Doorbell Camera. It's a great entry-level doorbell camera, overshadowed by the flashy, high-tech offerings of the ADC-VDB770.

With the SkyBell Alarm.com Slim Line II, you only get 720p live-streaming, and 720p recorded footage. Again, the live-streaming quality can be toned down to adjust for low-bandwidth and whatnot, but 720p is where it maxes out. This is still very clear footage, and you can pair it with the camera's wide field of view (170° Horizontal, 110° Vertical) for some truly excellent results. And you still get features and functions like push notifications on your phone regarding doorbell camera activity. Plus, you get the same great IR night vision capabilities. Overall, you aren't losing out on too much by going with the Slim Line II, so certainly consider it as a viable option. And you can't go wrong with that simple, yet modern rectangular slim design.


Last up, we'll discuss the Alarm.com Round SkyBell, also known as the ADC-VDB101 (Satin Nickel) and the ADC-VDB102 (Bronze). Honestly, there's not much reason to choose this model over the Slim Line II, unless you're particularly fond of the round design. The round model can also achieve a higher live video resolution (1080p vs 720p), though it is still limited to 720p for recorded clips. The camera of the round model offers an impressive 180° Field of View, and the night vision recording range is still about 15 feet in full color. This one doesn't use IR for night vision, so the more ambient light in the area, the better the nighttime images will be. Just like before, you can get push notification doorbell camera alerts on your phone, which is the main benefit of these devices.

Here is a breakdown of the doorbell cameras:


ADC-VDB770
Slim Line II
Round
Image(s)



Video Analytics
- (1) Ground Zone Recording Rule.
- Only "People" Set As Trigger.
None None
Motion Detection
From Video Analytics PIR PIR
Touchless Functionality
Yes (Cover & Mat Sold Separately) No No
Streaming Video Resolution
Up to 1440x1920 Up to 720p Up to 1080p
Recorded Video Resolution
Up to 1440x1920
Up to 720p Up to 720p
Horizontal Field of View
115° 170° 180° w/ auto-scaling
Vertical Field of View
150° 110° 180° w/ auto-scaling
High Dynamic Range (HDR)
Yes No No
Night Vision
Infrared (IR) ~15 Feet Infrared (IR) ~15 Feet
Full Color ~15 Feet
Microphone for Two-Way Audio
Omni-Directional Omni-Directional Omni-Directional
Power Requirements

16-30VAC, 10VA

15VDC, 8W (533mA)

10-36VAC, 10VA

12VDC, 0.5-1A

10-36VAC, 10VA

12VDC, 0.5-1A

Operating Temperature
-22°F to 104°F
-40°F to 104°F (w/ Temperature Collar)
-40°F to 122°F
-40°F to 140°F
Operating Humidity
Less than 95% RH, Non-Condensing 10% to 80% RH 0% to 100% Condensing
Clip Limits w/o Video Monitoring Plan
1 Video Doorbell Device Per Account.
1,200 Monthly Clips
1,200 Total Clips
Cannot Increase w/o Video Plan.
1 Video Doorbell Device Per Account.
400 Monthly Clips
400 Total Clips
Cannot Increase w/o Video Plan.
1 Video Doorbell Device Per Account.
400 Monthly Clips
400 Total Clips
Cannot Increase w/o Video Plan.

Have you used any of these doorbell cameras with Alarm.com? Please let us know about your experiences in the comments section below. Also, let us know if there are any other Alarm.com features you would like us to cover in a future blog post. We look forward to hearing from you!

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We have some exciting news from Alarm.com. The latest version of the Alarm.com Mobile App for iOS (Version 4.18) will make your enrolled smart locks compatible with Siri Shortcuts. This means that you will be able to control your smart locks with spoken voice commands. How convenient!


If you aren't familiar with Alarm.com Siri Shortcuts, they represent an innovative way to control your system and its integrated accessories using spoken voice commands. Each command is customized so that it performs the exact actions you want. Siri Shortcuts are available for iOS 12 and higher, so make sure your iOS device is on a high enough version before trying to set them up. We very strongly recommend reading this post from a couple years prior to refresh your memory on Siri Shortcuts and how they can be used. Overall, we think the Siri Shortcuts feature serves as a nice alternative to Apple HomeKit, which isn't compatible with Alarm.com or its associated security systems.

From what we can tell, the only way that a Siri Shortcut could control a smart door lock prior to Alarm.com iOS Version 4.18 was to do so indirectly through a smart scene. In other words, the user must create a smart scene that tells a door lock to LOCK or UNLOCK, and then create a customized Siri Shortcut to run that smart scene. Of course, a user would need separate scenes for LOCKING and ULOCKING, and they would need different scenes for each individual lock if they wanted complete control over their entire network of door locks. But with the update in iOS Version 4.18, smart lock control is made much more convenient and more easily accessible.

Thanks to the update, users can now create Siri Shortcuts that deal with locks directly, rather than being part of a smart scene. Each Siri Shortcut can control a single door lock, or a user can control all their locks at the same time with one single command. For a single lock, it's as simple as asking Siri to LOCK or UNLOCK a door based on the name of the lock. For example, you might say,

  • "Hey Siri, UNLOCK the FRONT DOOR."
  • "Hey Siri, LOCK the BACK DOOR."

Or if you wanted to control multiple doors,

  • "Hey Siri, LOCK all the doors."
  • "Hey Siri, UNLOCK every door."

Keep in mind that this door lock control for Siri Shortcuts is being made available in Alarm.com iOS Version 4.18. This update isn't available quite yet, but we expect it to be released in the coming days. At the time of this writing, the newest iOS Version we see is 4.17.3. You can check the version you're running by logging into the Alarm.com iOS App, and then choosing the Menu button (three horizontal bars) in the upper-left corner, and then selecting About in the bottom-left, and then About Alarm.com. The App Version will be displayed in white text across the top orange bar.


Remember to check the Apple App Store for the release of Alarm.com iOS App Version 4.18. Then open Settings within the Alarm.com Mobile App to access Siri Shortcuts. That is where you can enable the "Share Activity with Siri" settings and build customized Siri Shortcuts for use with your door locks. Remember that you can only control door locks that are enrolled with your Alarm.com account. Z-Wave door locks work great for this, and we have plenty of options available for purchase on our site if you are looking to get started.

Remember to check out our monitoring page if you are interested in starting monitoring service for access to Alarm.com. And please don't hesitate to reach out to us if you need help getting started with Alarm.com Siri Shortcuts for door locks. We're here to help you get the most out of your door locks and your Alarm.com service.

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If you have a hardwired security system with wired sensors, then it's likely you have set up some End Of Line Resistors (EOLRs) with your equipment. Today, we're taking a quick look at these pieces of equipment to explain how they get their name and why they're important for your system.


The simplest way to understand resistors (end of line or otherwise) is that they reduce the flow of electrical current. These devices have many potential uses, but today we will be focusing on how they are used with wired alarm systems to supervise connected sensors. Basically, the presence of an End Of Line Resistor tells a system that no sensors have been tampered with on a zone.

On a wired alarm system, you may have many hardwired zones. If you look at a single wired zone, there can be multiple sensors of the same or similar type connected to it, all in a line. From the alarm panel input moving outward, you will find the first sensor in the line, then the second sensor, and so on, until you reach the final sensor. That sensor is the end of the line. At that last sensor, you will have the end of line resistor (EOLR).

The reason why you have the resistor at the end of the line is because cutting any of the sensors leading up to the last sensor will cause the system to lose track of the EOLR. Basically, by putting the resistor at the very end, the system knows that all the sensors leading up to it are still in-place. The entire line, the entire series, if you will, has its current slowed, or resisted, by the EOLR. Once you either remove any of the connected sensors or attempt to short out any of them, current will then stop flowing through the circuit. The system will detect this and know that, at somewhere in the circuit, something has been tampered with, and the user needs to be informed.

Remember, this is also how the zone works normally. In a circuit where the sensors are normally closed and the EOLR is wired in series at the end of the line, opening a sensor, such as when you open a door, also prevents the system from seeing the resistor, which is what causes the zone to display a fault condition. In most cases, burglary zones will only show a fault when a zone has been tampered with. Rarely will they cause a trouble condition, though in some cases, it is possible to configure a zone especially for this type of behavior.

In many cases, resistors are actually installed at the terminals on the panel. The reason this is a bad idea is that when the resistor is at the panel, a burglar could put a short across any point in a normally closed zone, and the only way the user would be able to detect it would be if they noticed that a particular point on the zone was open, a window for example, and should have been showing a fault, but that no fault was actually being displayed on the keypad. If this happened on your system, would you take notice right away? Granted, this assumes the burglar had access to the system while it was disarmed, and was able to set this up in advance.

The above scenario would imply that the protected premise is a business or a home with a good deal of service personnel coming in and out. We use this scenario just to illustrate why proper resistor placement is so important. This same vulnerability exists on hardwired zones that are programmed as normally closed, or normally open. Though with a normally open zone, the intruder would cut the circuit anywhere between the panel and the first sensor, rather than shorting it.

It should be noted that an EOLR will be wired according to the behavior of the zone type. That is, an EOLR will be wired in Series (in line) for a Normally Closed (NC) zone, or it will be wired in Parallel (across) for a Normally Open (NO) zone. Keep that in mind when configuring the EOLRs for the different zones on your alarm system. And if you have a zone without any connected sensors, then you can still have a resistor at the end of the line, but that "end of line" would just be across the zone terminals themselves. This is a good practice in order to keep up with any unused resistors, in the event that you want to add a supervised wired zone to the system at a later time.

We hope that this quick lesson in end of line resistors may be helpful to anyone who is new with alarms, and perhaps working with a wired alarm system or wired sensors for the first time. If you have any questions about setting up a wired security system, or if you are hoping to learn more about Alarm Grid monitoring services, please send an email to support@alarmgrid.com. We're here to check your emails from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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Welcome to the second Alarm Grid video recap of 2021. It has been awhile since our first recap of the year, but we really hope to make this a regular thing like it was before. Technical difficulties have slowed us down, but we're going to be back in the swing of things very soon!


Only two (2) new Alarm Grid videos were uploaded in the past week, both of them on Monday, February 15th. They cover the Alarm.com ADC-T2000 Thermostat and the DSC PG9905 Temperature Sensor, respectively. Both videos featured myself as the actor. We hope to have our other video stars back as soon as possible, but it looks like you may have to settle with just me for the foreseeable future. Expect more videos coming really soon. Anyway, onto the newest Alarm Grid videos!

Setting an ADC-T2000 Back to Factory Default

I show you how to restore an Alarm.com ADC-T2000 Z-Wave Plus Thermostat to its factory default settings. All settings and configurations for the thermostat will be set to the same values as when the device was brand-new and fresh out of the package. You normally only factory default the ADC-T2000 Thermostat if you are selling it or giving it away to someone else. You may also perform a factory reset as a last-resort troubleshooting step if nothing else seems to fix an issue.


Programming DSC PG9905 to Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus

I show you how to program the DSC PG9905 Temperature Sensor to a Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus Alarm System. If your IQ Panel 2 Plus System is monitored with access to Alarm.com, then you can receive alerts for when your PG9905 Sensor is activated. However, if you set up the zone so that reports are sent out for Alarm.com alerts, then you will only be able to configure the PG9905 zone for either high temperature or low temperature alerts. The only way you can have a single PG9905 alert the system for both high and low temperatures is if you set the zone so that it does not report out to Alarm.com. Any temperature thresholds can be adjusted on the system as desired.

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Alarm Grid has learned about issues that may arise if you attempt to use an SIA PROM Chip on a Non-SIA Honeywell VISTA Panel. Doing so may prevent connected ECP devices from working properly. Issues may also arise if you attempt to use a Non-SIA PROM Chip on an SIA-approved VISTA Panel.

Before we discuss the issue itself, we will first cover some terminology to ensure that everyone is on the same page. Many Honeywell VISTA Alarm Panels come in both SIA and non-SIA variants. For example, there is the Honeywell VISTA-20PSIA and the Honeywell VISTA-20P, the Honeywell VISTA-15PSIA and the Honeywell VISTA-15P, etc. When you see SIA in the panel's name, that indicates that the alarm panel has been configured to meet various guidelines outlined by the Security Industry Association (SIA) for false alarm prevention. For all intents and purposes, SIA-Compliant VISTA Panels are basically the exact same as non-SIA VISTA Panels, except that the SIA-approved panels have various programming restrictions put into place to prevent false alarms. For example, an SIA-compliant VISTA Panel will not allow you to disable Entry and Exit Delay periods, and they will require you to set a minimum Dialer Delay for the system. There are various other restrictions that we won't cover in this post. Just know that an SIA-compliant system will have various restrictions in programming for the purpose of preventing false alarms.

Meanwhile, the PROM Chip installed on a Honeywell VISTA System sets its firmware. You can easily locate the PROM Chip on your VISTA System's green circuit board. Just look for the small black square chip with the white sticker on it. The white sticker includes version information so the user can identify the type of VISTA System they are using and its current firmware. Users remove older PROM Chips and replace them with newer ones as a means of upgrading their VISTA Systems to support new features. Alarm Grid sells 15P PROM Chips, 20P PROM Chips, and 21iP PROM Chips for Honeywell VISTA Systems. We typically advise replacing a 15P or 20P PROM Chip with less than Firmware Version 9.12, as that is the minimum version needed to support Total Connect 2.0. Likewise, the minimum PROM Chip needed on a VISTA-21iP for Total Connect 2.0 is 3.13. For more information on replacing PROM Chips, please see this helpful FAQ.

Please note that it is only possible to replace a PROM Chip on a VISTA System with a firmware version or PROM Chip version of 2.0 or higher. If your VISTA System shows a PROM Chip version of less than 2.0, then it is not possible to replace its PROM Chip, and you must replace the panel entirely. Also note, that you should never attempt to remove or replace a PROM Chip while your VISTA Panel is powered on. Always power down the panel completely before replacing its PROM Chip.

For the longest time, it was believed that you could use an SIA PROM Chip on its non-SIA VISTA printed circuit board (PCB) without experiencing an issue. For example, if you removed the PROM Chip on a Honeywell VISTA-20P, and replaced it with a WA20PSIA PROM Chip, then it was believed that no issues would occur. The same was believed to be true if you used a non-SIA PROM Chip on an SIA-compliant VISTA board. An example there would be if you removed the PROM Chip on a Honeywell VISTA-20PSIA and replaced it with a 20P PROM Chip. Aside from determining what was allowable within programming, no other issues were believed to occur if you used an SIA PROM Chip on a non-SIA VISTA System PCB, or vice-versa.

But upon further testing, that is not the case starting with VISTA System Firmware Version 9.17 on VISTA-20P Panels. Any Honeywell VISTA-20P PCB (non-SIA) that is being upgraded to Panel Firmware Version 9.17 or higher must have a non-SIA 20P PROM Chip. Likewise, any Honeywell VISTA-20PSIA System PCB (SIA-Compliant) that is being upgraded to Panel Firmware Version 9.17 or higher must have a 20PSIA PROM Chip. If you try to use an SIA PROM Chip on a non-SIA VISTA System (or vice-versa), then it is possible that peripheral devices connected to the system's ECP bus may not work properly. ECP devices for a VISTA System include any wired keypads, any alarm monitoring communicators, and any wireless receivers. This same error is also believed to occur on any Honeywell VISTA-15P (or VISTA-15PSIA) that is being upgraded to Panel Firmware Version 9.17 or higher, though further testing is needed to verify if that is indeed the case.

You can determine whether your VISTA System is an SIA Panel PCB or a non-SIA Panel PCB by checking a sticker on the panel's terminal block. This is a small barcode sticker at the bottom of the terminal block, below the phone line terminals. Check for one of the following messages:

  • SAVS20PSIA - Regular VISTA-20P
  • SAV20P-SIAP - VISTA-20PSIA
  • SAVS15PSIA - Regular VISTA-15P
  • SAV15P-SIAP - VISTA-15PSIA

Long story short, if you are using a Honeywell VISTA-20P, VISTA-20PSIA, VISTA-15P, or VISTA-15PSIA and you wish to PROM upgrade it to System Firmware Version 9.17 or higher, then make absolutely sure to use a PROM Chip specifically designed for that particular board. Do not attempt to use an SIA-equivalent on a non-SIA board, or a non-SIA Chip on an SIA-Compliant VISTA board. Mixing an SIA Chip on a non-SIA board (or vice-versa) for 15P or 20P Systems (or SIA equivalents) when upgrading to Firmware Version 9.17 or higher can result in ECP devices not working properly. As long as you use a proper PROM Chip for your system, then no issues should arise. If you are ordering a PROM upgrade chip from Alarm Grid then place your order and be sure to specify which version you need by sending us an email using the email address listed below. If you purchase either the Honeywell LTEIA-TC2 or LTEIV-TC2 or any of our other upgrade kits for VISTA panels, then you will receive all four of the available upgrade chips. Just be sure to select the correct chip for your VISTA PCB.

If you have any further questions about Honeywell VISTA Systems and their PROM Chips, or if you want to learn more about alarm monitoring service for your Honeywell VISTA System, please send an email to support@alarmgrid.com. We're here to answer any questions or concerns you might have. Our hours for responding to emails run from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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You may recall that we made a post about a month ago discussing "issues" that have been affecting the IQ Panel 2 Plus and its ability to be used as a secondary Z-Wave controller. We have a rather extreme follow up today, as Qolsys has revealed that the system never supported the feature!


When we released the initial post on the subject, we were not aware of the true" extent" of the issue. We certainly didn't expect to find out that Qolsys never even made it possible for the feature to work. We won't dive super deep into the subject here, as there really isn't much to say, The raw truth is that you cannot use the IQ2 as a secondary Z-Wave controller.

It is possible to add a secondary Z-Wave controller to the IQ Panel 2 and have the IQ2 operate as the primary controller. But you can never make the IQ Panel 2 System a secondary Z-Wave controller. We apologize for any inconvenience or confusion that this may have caused. For a more in-depth look at the subject, we strongly recommend reading this comprehensive FAQ that explains the inability of the IQ2 to be used as a secondary controller in much greater detail.

Now, maybe you have explored the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Advanced Z-Wave Settings Menus in glorious detail, just like we have. If you have, then you will know that secondary controller options do exist within the IQ2 menus. Based on that alone, you would think that there must be a way to get this type of setup to work, right? That's the problem. The menu options might be there, plain as day. But trust us, if you try to make the IQ2 a secondary Z-Wave controller, then it will not work,

What we need to do now is focus on the implications that arise from the system's inability to be used as a secondary controller. As a result of the IQ Panel 2 being unable to operate as a secondary Z-Wave controller, the system loses out on potential compatibility with a wide selection of automation hubs. This includes compatibility with Samsung SmartThings, Vera Smart Controllers, Nexia Smart Home Automation Systems, and much more. Seriously, while the IQ2 once had excellent prospects of pairing nicely with almost any centralized Z-Wave hub, those prospects are all but gone.

Fortunately, there are other alarm systems that do not share this same limitation of the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 and IQ Panel 2 Plus. Most notably, we will recommend the Honeywell Lyric Controller. The Lyric has proven on repeated occasions to "play nicely" as a secondary controller. One example can be seen in this FAQ, which explains the benefits of making the Lyric a secondary Z-Wave controller, while also helping users get started. If you are thinking about purchasing a new Honeywell Lyric Alarm System for its excellent versatility in smart home automation, then you may also want to check out this buying guide. Although that particular buying guide was written for the Lyric during a holiday buying season a couple of years prior, it is still relevant in helping new Lyric System users explore their options for getting the most out of the system.

If you have any questions about the Honeywell Lyric or any other popular alarm control panel, or if you want to learn more about our monitoring services, send an email to support@alarmgrid.com. We're here to check your emails from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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One thing we have noticed about the 2GIG GC3e is that it seems to be prone to erroneous Supervision Trouble conditions. This has left some users confused as to why their system zones are not working properly. But luckily, we have some tips to prevent this from happening to you and your GC3e.

Before we give our three (3) tips to follow, let's make sure we're all on the same page by explaining what Supervision Trouble normally refers to. Supervision Trouble occurs when a system does not receive a periodic "check-in" signal from an enrolled wireless sensor. This is usually either the result of the sensor not being able to send out its check-in signal, or the check-in signal not reaching the intended destination of the alarm panel. Some reasons why the sensor might not send out the signal include the sensor being powered down due to a dead or removed battery, or the sensor being physically destroyed. Some reasons why the the sensor's wireless check-in signal might not reach the alarm panel could include the sensor being moved to a new location in the building, or new obstacles, such as thick walls or large metal structures, being added inside the building. Regardless of the cause, you need to make it so that the sensor's check-in signals successfully reach the panel. Once you do that, you can clear the trouble condition. For GC3e users, you can learn how to clear the trouble condition by reviewing this FAQ.

But for the 2GIG GC3e, we have seen Supervision Trouble conditions occur, even when the sensor is powered on, successfully enrolled, and in clear communication range of the alarm panel. The issue seems to be particularly prevalent for the encrypted 2GIG eSeries Sensors that were built specifically for new 2GIG Alarm Systems. The good news is that our research has found that these sensor consistently and reliably work as intended, without causing any Supervision Trouble, as long as you follow some basic principles when using and setting up these devices. In addition to making sure that your sensor is powered on and communicating successfully with your 2GIG GC3e Panel, here are three (3) quick and easy tips to keep in mind whenever you are enrolling or configuring your 2GIG eSeries Sensors with your GC3e.


1) Reprogram from scratch when replacing an old sensor. If you have a sensor enrolled with your 2GIG GC3e, and you need to replace it with a new one, then you should remember to clear or delete the zone first, and then reprogram the entire zone from scratch, this time using the new sensor. Many users will need to do this if an old sensor becomes lost or damaged. While it might seem easier to just go in and remove the enrolled Serial Number for the zone, and then auto-learn the new one, this process has been known to cause Supervision Troubles. It's true that a sensor is identified based on its Serial Number, but you can't just delete the old Serial Number, add the new one, and expect everything to work perfectly. This is even the case if you are deleting a sensor and replacing it with one of the exact same model, for the exact same Sensor Type. Instead, take the extra time, delete the zone entirely, and then program it from scratch. For more information on the process, please review this page.

2) Reprogram from scratch when moving a sensor to a new partition. The same rule applies if you are moving an existing sensor to a new partition. This may be something to keep in mind if you are setting up system partitions for the first time, or if you want to change which zones users on a certain partition are able to control. If you are unaware, the 2GIG GC3e supports four (4) partitions, which are referred to as "Smart Areas", and the feature must be enabled at Q69 of System Configuration. More information on Smart Areas and how to set them up can be found here. Regardless, many users think that they can simply change the Partition Assignment within a zone, while keeping all other zone settings the same, and expect it to then function without a hitch. Unfortunately, it isn't that easy, as not completing this process properly may result in Supervision Trouble. Again, you must clear out the zone, and reprogram it from scratch. The only difference is that this time, you must assign the correct partition number, instead of the one it used originally. Alarm Grid invites you to check out this FAQ on switching GC3e Partition Assignments.

3) Always use the correct Equipment Code for 2GIG eSeries Sensors. The last tip we have involves the use of proper Equipment Codes. Before the rise of encryption, the Equipment Code setting was largely symbolic, and as long as an appropriate "equivalent" equipment code was used when programming a sensor, no issues would likely occur. But since the encrypted 2GIG eSeries Sensors use advanced "two-way" communication, using an incorrect Equipment Code can cause unwanted behavior, including Supervision Trouble. This one is a bit easier to fix, as you can often just replace the improper Equipment Code with the correct one in zone programming. If that doesn't work, then you can take the next step of trying to reprogram the entire zone from scratch. But you should be able to clear the trouble condition as normal once the Equipment Code is correct, based on the eSeries Sensor you are using.

The table below shows the Equipment Codes for 2GIG eSeries Sensors:

Product Name Equipment Code
2GIG eSeries Smoke Detector (USA) 2058
2GIG eSeries CO Detector (USA) 2860
2GIG eSeries Tilt Sensor 2061
2GIG eSeries Flood Sensor 2065
2GIG eSeries Shock Sensor 2066
2GIG eSeries Repeater 2067
2GIG eSeries Translator 2068
2GIG eSeries Water Sensor 2070
2GIG eSeries Thin Door/Window Contact 2862
2GIG eSeries Recessed Door Contact 2863
2GIG eSeries Glass Break Detector 2864
2GIG eSeries Pet-Immune PIR Motion Sensor 2869
2GIG eSeries Takeover Module 2873
2GIG eSeries 4-Button Keyfob Remote 2866
2GIG eSeries Outdoor Door/Window Contact 2865
2GIG eSeries Panic Switch 2868
2GIG eSeries Smoke/CO Takeover Listener 2069

If you are an Alarm Grid monitored customer needing help with your 2GIG GC3e, or if you are interested in starting new service with Alarm Grid, please email our technical support team and security system planners at support@alarmgrid.com. We're here to help you from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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If you haven't been keeping an eye on the Alarm Grid YouTube Channel, then you may have missed the two (2) new videos we uploaded last week. It has been awhile since our last video recap, so we wanted to give these a special highlight. We hope to be back in the studio regularly very soon!


Before we focus on the new videos, we have some good news and bad news. The bad news is that it may still be a few more weeks before we are able to really start concentrating on them again and begin putting them out like we used to. Our Florida office is in a state of flux right now behind the scenes, and while this should have no impact on our ability to provide you with top-quality service, it does impact our ability to shoot, edit, and upload new videos. And once we are back doing videos, keep in mind that it may take us another week or two to really "shake off the rust" and get back in the swing of things. We ask for your patience during this time, and we apologize that we haven't been able to give you the new videos that you have come to expect from us.

But the good news is that we expect new videos to return very soon, with all of your favorite faces, and maybe even some new ones at some point in 2021. We know we're off to a bit of a slow start, but we truly believe that this can be the best year yet for the Alarm Grid Video Team. There are some great ideas sitting in the bin, and we're very eager and excited to put them out. We just ask for some patience as we work to get things set up. It won't be long until you're checking out new videos every week to get the most out of your security system!

With that out of the way, let's take a look at the two (2) new videos we have for you today. These are the very first Alarm Grid videos of 2021, and they cover some great topics. We only had time to get Jorge into the Alarm Grid studio, so he's the star of both of these videos. Special thanks to Jorge and our video team for rallying and putting these together. We know that two videos isn't very much, but we hope that these can at least hold you over until we make a full return to the studio and really begin reminding everyone just what our team is capable of accomplishing. But enough stalling. Here are the newest Alarm Grid videos!

Troubleshooting a Lyric Using Apple HomeKit

Jorge provides some troubleshooting tips for a Honeywell Lyric System that is using Apple HomeKit. The HomeKit integration for the Lyric allows you to receive a limited selection of Lyric System Alerts from the HomeKit platform on your iOS device, and perform various system functions using spoken Siri voice commands. To start using the HomeKit integration, your Lyric System must be activated for monitoring service, as HomeKit functionality can only be enabled remotely by your alarm monitoring company. HomeKit service is usually used to supplement Total Connect 2.0, as TC2 provides greater detail regarding system activity and faulted zones than HomeKit.


Entering Programming On a Partitioned IQ Panel 2 Plus

Jorge shows you the differences that occur when you go to enter programming on a Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus system that has partitions enabled, versus one that does not. Alarm system partitions are used to section off a single system into multiple "areas" that can be armed and disarmed independently from one another. When you have partitions enabled on the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus, you are asked to provide a code before you even access the main screen. The code you enter will determine your level of authority. You will only need to provide a code again if your originally entered code lacks the authority to access a particular menu or setting. But if partitions are not enabled, then you won't need to provide a code unless you attempt to access menu options with restricted access, such as the Installation Menu.

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In order to reboot a router remotely using a VISTA P-Series Panel, you will manually activate an output, which will fault a zone. The zone fault will be programmed to activate a Z-Wave switch, which is powering the internet router or modem. A cellular connection is required to do this.

And there you have it, that's how you do it! Just kidding! We're going to cover exactly what you need to do. Alarm Grid had this scenario come up recently and thought it would make a good case study to cover.

First, we wrote an FAQ that covers how to manually control a programmable output through the keypad. But then we thought that putting the FAQ together with information outlining the exact problem that we resolved by using the manual output command might add some much-needed context and show how this command can really come in handy. This also outlines one of the reasons why a cellular communicator is so important to have as a backup to an internet connection!

Let me set the scene: The hero in our case study spends several months each year away from his primary residence. The system installed in this residence is a Honeywell VISTA-20P with a Honeywell Home Tuxedo installed, as well as an LTE dual-path communicator. The Honeywell LTE-IA or the Honeywell LTE-IV are equally suitable for use in this scenario. In addition, any of the compatible automation controllers, such as the Honeywell VAM or the older Tuxedo Touch WIFI, could be used instead of the newer Honeywell Home Tuxedo.

The Problem

While our hero is enjoying his time away, he discovers that his internet connection at home is down. Of course, if he were at home, the first thing he would do, after verifying that his ISP isn't experiencing an outage, is reboot his router to see if the connection comes back up. But he's not at home, and furthermore, there is no one he can send to his home to perform this task for him. Now, since he has a dual-path communicator with the cellular connection enabled and active, he doesn't have to worry that his panel won't be able to communicate a signal if the alarm goes off. He's safe in that regard. However, in addition to the alarm panel's ability to send signals through the internet when it is available, the Tuxedo also uses the internet to provide a communication path to Total Connect 2.0 so that he can control his Z-Wave automation devices remotely. This is a problem, and it's the problem we're here to solve.

Just to recap, we have a VISTA-20P Panel that is working, and it can communicate alarm signals via the cellular path. It can also be controlled via Total Connect 2.0 through the cellular path. We have a Honeywell Home Tuxedo that is working, and it can communicate with the panel through its hardwired keypad bus connection, but it can't communicate to TC2 through the internet. This means there is no way to remotely control Z-Wave Automation devices. Finally, we have an LTE dual-path communicator that is working on the cellular path, but not on the internet path.

The Solution

Basically, what this requires is a way to send a command from Total Connect 2.0 to the VISTA-20P Panel through the communicator's cellular connection. This command must be something that the panel can perform based on an entry from a keypad. In this case, we are going to enter a command via the TC2 keypad that will cause a programmable output to change state. This output is connected to a zone on the panel. When the output changes state, it will fault the zone. Then, based on the programming in a scene, the Tuxedo will turn the Z-Wave Module that is connected and providing power to the router OFF. This will drop power to the router. After a few seconds, another command will be entered through the keypad which will restore the zone, and a second scene will tell the Tuxedo that a restore on the zone causes the Z-Wave module to turn back ON. This will restore power to the router.

Here are the full details for this solution:

The first step in setting this up is making sure that you have an available zone to use as your triggering zone. If you have one of the hardwired zones on the panel available, then you can actually use Output 18, Trigger 2 for this purpose. Any of the hardwired zones 2 thru 8 can be used with this trigger. You can also use Output 17, Trigger 1, but it provides more current than Trigger 2, so we recommend that you save it for other potential uses. If you don't have one of these zones available, then you can use a zone on a Honeywell 4219 or 4229 8-zone expander, but this will also require the use of a relay instead of a trigger. If you are using the 4229, it has two (2) programmable relays built into it. If you are using the 4219, then you will need to add a Honeywell 4204. It is also possible to use a zone input from a wireless zone, such as a Honeywell 5816, along with one of the above mentioned relays.

One reason we love using Trigger 2, Output 18 for this is because it's so simple. Output 18 is already enabled in panel programming location *79, and as long as its programming hasn't been changed from the default, no additional programming is required for the output to work. However, there is still the matter of programming the zone to be used. In our example, we show Output 18, Trigger 2 connected to Zone 03. As you can see in the diagram below, we have connected the trigger to the Hi side of the zone, on terminal 12. As mentioned before, you can use this configuration on any of the Zones 02 thru 08, connecting the trigger wire to the Hi side of the zone. The reason you can't use this on Zone 01 is because the Zone 01 negative is completely isolated from all other negative terminals on the board. In order for the trigger to work to fault the zone, it must be common to the zone negative when the trigger is activated.


If you need to use a relay instead of the trigger, you will need to wire the relay to the zone so that when you turn the Relay ON, it faults the connected zone, and when you turn the Relay OFF, it restores that zone. The way this must be done will depend on the type of zone it is being connected to. When using a 5816 with the input terminals, you will need to wire one terminal of the transmitter to the relay's Common (C) and the other terminal to the relay's Normally Closed (NC). If you're using an expansion zone on a Honeywell 4219 or Honeywell 4229, then the wiring used for this zone, and whether or not an End-of-Line Resistor (EOLR) is used, will depend on how the rest of the zones on that expander are configured, as well as on the age of the expander. Earlier versions required an EOLR for each zone, while newer versions provide an option not to use the EOLR, based on the setting of a dip switch. The important thing to know here is that when a 4204 or 4229 relay is OFF, it has continuity between Common (C) and Normally Closed (NC). When it is ON, it has continuity between Common (C) and Normally Open (NO).


With the output wiring out of the way, we can move on to programming the zone. We're not going to go through the entire zone programming process. You can find information about how to program a zone on a VISTA-20P Panel in this FAQ. The two important things to know when it comes to zone programming are the Zone Type and the Hardwire Type. The Zone Type should be set to Zone Type 23, No Alarm Response. This Zone Type was specifically created to allow the panel to activate outputs based on a zone's change of state. Basically, Zone Type 23 allows the panel to recognize that a fault and/or fault restore has occurred on a zone, without it having to display a fault for that zone, or take any other action with regard to the zone itself. Zone Type 23 will never show a fault, and it will never cause an alarm condition. The Hardwire Type should be set to Normally Open (Entry 2 when prompted). Again, see the FAQ linked above for full details on zone programming. The Hardwire Type programming of Normally Open is specifically meant for use with the trigger connection shown above. If using a relay instead of a trigger, the Hardwire Type or Input Type setting may need to be different, depending on your wiring configuration, and the zone number.

The next step is to pair the Z-Wave module with the Honeywell Home Tuxedo. As always, we recommend that you first Exclude or Remove the Z-Wave device using the Tuxedo, before attempting to Include or Add the device. The reason we always recommend doing this is because devices are often joined to a Z-Wave network at the factory as part of Quality Assurance (QA). In many cases, once the device has been successfully joined to the test network, it is never cleared, and is simply packaged and sold as it is. Once a Z-Wave device has been paired with a network, it holds onto that network information until it receives a command telling it to forget the old network so that it can join a new one. The process of Excluding or Removing, is what tells a Z-Wave device to forget the old network. It's fortunate that any Z-Wave controller can tell any Z-Wave device to forget its old network!

A word about which Z-Wave module to use. You can use either an in-wall switch, or a plug-in module. If your Z-Wave Automation Controller supports Z-Wave Plus, then we always recommend using a Z-Wave Plus device. Although any Z-Wave controller can support just about any Z-Wave module, a Z-Wave Plus module loses its Z-Wave Plus attributes, including extended range and battery life, when used with an older Z-Wave controller. We like the idea of using a plug-in module, as it allows you to easily move your router if you begin to have range or interference issues.

Once the Z-Wave module has been learned into the Tuxedo, VAM, or Tuxedo Touch WIFI you then need to create a scene which will tell the module to turn OFF when Zone 3 (or whatever zone you choose to use) is faulted. You will need to program a second scene to tell the same module to turn ON when Zone 3 is restored. The easiest way to perform this programming is through Total Connect 2.0. We like to program scenes using the website, the examples that follow will assume that is how the scenes are being setup.

After logging into Total Connect 2.0, choose the menu option for scenes. If you do not see this option, contact your alarm dealer, and be sure that your account is properly configured, and that your monitoring plan includes access to Automation. For Alarm Grid customers, this would be our Silver Plan (Self or Full), or higher. After clicking on Scenes, choose Create Scene.


This will take you through a scene creation wizard. The first step is to name the Scene. This should be something easy to distinguish from other scenes, such as "Router Off". After choosing Continue, you will see where you can choose how the scene will be triggered. In our case, we want Triggered by a device, and when we expand this option, we then want to expand the section titled Sensors. Under Sensors, we see Zone 3, which we have named Router. When we expand this option, we can choose that this scene will activate when Zone 3 is Open (faulted) or Closed (restored). We intend to turn OFF the Z-Wave device when Zone 3 is faulted, so we will choose "When it is open".


After choosing which zone(s) you want to trigger the Z-Wave device, you will be taken to Step 3 of the scene creation wizard. In this step, you will choose which device (or devices) you want to control, and whether you want them to turn ON or OFF. This is our Router OFF scene, so we set our action accordingly.

Now that we have created an initial scene, in order to add the second scene (the one that will turn the router power back on) we need to click the + symbol in the upper right of the Scenes screen.


The programming for this scene will be almost identical to the first scene. We still want to trigger by device. The device is Sensor 3, which we named ROUTER, and we want the Z-Wave device to be turned ON when Sensor 3 is Closed, meaning the fault on the zone is restored. Here's the summary for the second scene.


That is the end of the programming and wiring for this solution. The final step is for our hero to manually activate Trigger 2, Output 18 through the keypad screen in Total Connect 2.0. Do this by entering the following command:

4-Digit Code + [#] + [7] + [18]

By entering this command, we're telling Output 18, Trigger 2 to activate. When it activates, it connects to ground. This ground is common to the Lo side of Zone 3. This causes a short on the zone (which is why we programmed it as Normally Open), which in turn causes it to fault. The fault on Zone 3 causes the Z-Wave device being used to power the router to turn OFF, powering the router down.

After around 20 seconds, our hero should enter the following command to restore Zone 3:

4-Digit Code + [#] + [8] + [18]

By entering this command, we are telling Output 18, Trigger 2 to deactivate. When it deactivates, the trigger disconnects from ground. This opens the circuit on Zone 3, causing it to restore from a faulted condition. This in turn causes the Z-Wave device being used to power the router to turn it back ON, powering the router back up. Once more, keep in mind that this option is only available because the customer in question, our hero, chose to use a dual-path communication method. If he had chosen to use an IP only connection, there would be no way for him to initiate the keypad command through Total Connect 2.0 that gets this ball rolling.

If you happen to be using a relay instead of the trigger output, there will be a few minor tweaks that you will need to make to this process. One of those tweaks will be the output number that you will use when performing this command. The FAQ that we linked in the second paragraph above goes into more detail on how to set this up using a relay, including covering the programming required in programming location *79.

If you need further assistance using this setup with a relay, feel free to reach out to us at support@alarmgrid.com. Our technical support staff are available M - F from 9:00 am to 8:00 pm Eastern. We will have some closures soon due to the holidays, so pay attention to our blog for information about when those will be. As always, we look forward to hearing from you!

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You have likely heard us talking about the benefits of PowerG Sensors at one point or another. Today, we figured we would break down the benefits of these sensors and explain why we like them so much. Let's take an in-depth look at PowerG Sensors and all of their wonderful benefits.


PowerG Sensors were originally designed for the hardwired DSC PowerSeries NEO Systems. By adding a compatible transceiver unit to your PowerSeries NEO, the system will be able to support PowerG Sensors. Johnson Controls, which you may know as the parent company of DSC, took the technology associated with PowerG Sensors, and brought it over to the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 System. This move was not a major surprise, as Johnson Controls also had partial ownership over Qolsys at the time, and Johnson Controls has since bought out Qolsys entirely.

The addition of PowerG support for the IQ2 marked the beginning of the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus, which is how the system is still marketed and sold today. PowerG support is also available for the DSC Iotega, though that panel has largely flopped due to its lack of local end user programming. Today, the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus represents the most popular panel for supporting PowerG. All versions and variants of the IQ Panel 2 Plus support PowerG Sensors, and their exceptional performance makes them the go-to choice for IQ2+ users who want equipment with the best versatility and protection.

Starting with the range, PowerG Sensors can be used from up to 2,000 feet away from the IQ Panel 2 Plus when they are used in an open air environment. By open air environment, we are talking about a perfect setting with a direct line of sight, and no obstacles between the sensor and the alarm panel. Most homes and businesses do not provide the ideal, "open air" environment, as there are usually walls and metal appliances present. When you see us mention that 2,000 feet open air range, take that with a grain of salt, because in practice, the range is likely a bit less. But still, we can undoubtedly say that PowerG offers arguably the best wireless range in the security industry. Even if its nominal range isn't quite as far as its "open air range", it is still a very powerful signal that can help you overcome the range issues that other sensor lineups may experience. It is great for use in detached garages, barns, multi-building complexes, and even just large industrial buildings.


To make matters even better, there is also a PowerG Repeater, the PG9920. This device will effectively double the range of any PowerG Sensor and help you overcome range limitations caused by thick walls and other obstacles or signal disruptions. The repeater works by taking the signal sent out from any PowerG Sensor and sending it out a second time with just as much power and force as when it was first sent from the original sensor. By strategically placing the repeater, it's theoretically possible to double the useful wireless range of these sensors. That would mean that they can be used from up to 4,000 feet away from the IQ2+ in an open air environment. And if your building is particularly large, you may even have repeaters going away from the IQ Panel 2 Plus System in different directions, including up and down in building stories above or below.

But PowerG Sensors offer more than just an impressive wireless range. They are also known for their exceptional security. This is thanks to their military grade 128-bit AES encryption. To put this as simply as possible, the PowerG Sensor and the panel share a unique encryption key at the time of pairing. The sensor must provide this encryption key to the panel whenever it transmits a signal. Additionally, the panel must then provide a return response with the encryption key as verification in order for the command to go through. In the past, we have referred to this two-way communication process as a "digital handshake". Because of this encrypted pairing process, a PowerG Sensor actively knows whether or not it is currently paired with a panel. You may need to factory default a PowerG Sensor before you can pair it with a new system.


PowerG Sensors also take proactive measures against RF jamming. When a wireless sensor communicates with an alarm panel, it does so at a certain wireless radio frequency (RF). When we talk about RF jamming, we are referring to any malicious technique that prevents wireless signals from reaching their intended destination. This is accomplished by blocking the receiver with a stronger signal at the same wireless frequency as the device that is legitimately trying to communicate with it. When this is done on an alarm system, the system doesn't receive the incoming signals from faulted sensors, and no action is taken during a security breach or an unfavorable environmental condition. Early wireless sensors did not take this into account, and this made RF jamming an effective way to defeat an older wireless system.

The way that PowerG Sensors overcome RF jamming techniques is through a process called Frequency Hopping Spread Spectrum (FHSS). This process involves splitting the RF bandwidth into multiple channels. Each independent channel represents a unique radio frequency for wireless communication to occur. The transmitter (the PowerG Sensor) and the receiver (the alarm panel) both agree on a set of channel hopping sequences that will take place. These sequences are encrypted and time-based for them to occur seamlessly. Since the transmitter and the receiver are both synchronized, they can switch between channels very rapidly. A potential intruder would never be able to re-tun an RF jamming device to keep up. In the case of the PowerG Sensors, the frequency hops occur between 912 MHz and 918 MHz. There are 50 different unique frequency channels that are used, and frequency switches occur 64 times per second. More information on FHSS is available here.

One other benefit of PowerG Sensors that we have never discussed previously is their Adaptive Transmission feature that helps them conserve battery life. This is why you will often see a PowerG Sensor with a very long expected battery life, sometimes more than ten (10) years). Adaptive Transmission involves two-way communication between the PowerG Sensor and the alarm panel. The alarm panel will tell the PowerG Sensor how well its signal is being received. The PowerG Sensor can then adapt its outgoing signal so that it reliably reaches the panel, without expending too much energy. The sensor and the panel regularly exchange this information so that the ideal amount of energy is always used in signal transmissions. This saves battery life in the long run.

We have also found that PowerG Sensors are extremely easy to enroll and they offer the reliable and effective performance that you should expect out of your security system. We wholeheartedly recommend them for use on the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus, as well as any other compatible alarm system. It is expected that the upcoming Qolsys IQ Hub will also be able to utilize PowerG Sensors, so look forward to using PowerG Sensors on that panel once it is available.


For now, if you have any questions about PowerG Sensors or the systems that support them, or if you are interested in signing up for new alarm monitoring service, then please reach out to us by emailing support@alarmgrid.com. We'll be available to check your emails from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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