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Last week, we took a look at three of the best alarm panels in the industry. These were the Honeywell Lyric, the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus, and the 2GIG GC3e. Today, we are checking out the sensors that you can add to support these systems. Here is our 2020 Security Sensor Buying Guide!

Sensors are accessories that are added to alarm systems to report specific activity. Each sensor has its own job of looking for a certain type of activity in its designated location. All of the sensors on a system communicate with a single centralized panel or hub. This panel is actively listening for any sensor that is triggered due to a potentially important system event. Adding new sensors is perhaps the best way to expand upon an existing system, and they make awesome gifts and stocking stuffers for the security enthusiast in your life.

Broadly speaking, sensors can be split into two main categories, which are security and life safety/environmental. Security sensors look for activity that suggests potentially unauthorized entry into a monitored and protected location, such as a door being opened, movement in a room where nobody is supposed to be present, or a window being broken. Life safety/environmental sensors look for activity associated with unwanted or potentially harmful conditions that affect the well-being of those in the area, such as a flood, an extreme temperature, a fire, or the presence of CO gas. We'll be taking a look at life safety/environmental sensors another time. Today, our focus is on security sensors.

Wireless Sensor Basics


Before we dive into specific security sensors for our top panel picks, we're going to start by giving you some general, generic information that can be applied to any sensor out there. First, understand that this post is focusing only on wireless sensors. These are almost always the sensors chosen for use with wireless alarm systems. Wired sensors can also technically be used with wireless panels but a converter module is almost always needed. Not to mention the fact that wireless sensors are significantly easier to install, especially for DIY users. The only time you will realistically see wired sensors used with a wireless panel is if a user is upgrading from an older wired system and bringing over their old wired sensors, or in new construction where a user wants to integrate the sensors in with the building. But if you're expanding upon a wireless system by getting new sensors, then the new sensors will almost certainly be wireless.

The important thing to remember when choosing wireless sensors for a wireless alarm panel is making sure the sensor is compatible with the system. It doesn't matter if a sensor has all the specs and features if it doesn't work with your panel! The way to determine compatibility is to look at the lineup that the sensor is from. Petty much every wireless sensor out there is part of a larger grouping of sensors that will all have the same compatibility.

To make it easier for you, we have the three panels we mentioned before (well, make that five, as the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus actually comes in three versions), and all their compatible sensor lineups conveniently listed. We hope that this sheds some light on your options. The only caveat is that for any panel listed here that supports the Honeywell 5800 Sensors, we must be clear that this is only for the uni-directional sensors with one-way communication in the lineup. Any bi-directional Honeywell 5800 Sensors with two-way communication will not work with any of the aforementioned systems. The bi-directional Honeywell 5800 Sensors are only compatible with the Honeywell LYNX Touch and VISTA Systems, which were not included in our buying guides.

With that out of the way, here are compatible sensor lineups by system:

You will notice that some of the sensor groups listed above are italicized and underlined. That is done to identify the lineups of encrypted sensors. These encrypted sensors have special protection measures put in place to make them more secure and less prone to being hacked or defeated by malicious attacks. Encrypted sensors tend to have more restricted compatibility. They may follow a special enrollment process. Encrypted sensors often use bi-directional communication so that the sensor knows that it is actively paired with the system. Many encrypted sensors may only be paired with a single system at any given time, and the sensor will need to be deleted from its existing system before it will work with a new one.

It's okay to use non-encrypted sensors with your system, especially in zones that are less likely to trigger an alarm, like a second story window. Many users will opt to use a mixture of both encrypted and non-encrypted sensors. Other users feel comfortable using entirely non-encrypted sensors. It really comes down to your level of comfort. Non-encrypted sensors are secure in most situations, and they are still tricky to defeat. But going fully encrypted is recommended for anyone seeking maximum security. One tip if you do decide to go with some non-encrypted sensors is to avoid letting others know what wireless frequency your sensors use or what type of system you have installed. Knowing the frequency and the system being used makes it much easier for a savvy intruder to defeat a sensor.

Door & Window Alarm Sensors


Now that you know some basics that apply to almost all wireless sensors, let's start talking about specific types and models. Door and window sensors will let a system know when a door or window has been opened or closed. These are some of the most basic and easy to use sensors on a security system. These devices work by using a larger sensor portion and a smaller magnet portion. The sensor is placed on or inside the door or window frame, and the magnet is placed on or inside the moving portion of the door or window. When the door or window is opened, the magnet will move away from the sensor. This will trip a metal reed switch inside the sensor, which will tell the sensor to alert the system to the opened door or window. All of the sensors we've listed here follow that same method of operation.

Door and window sensors can be split into two (2) main categories. Surface-mount door and window sensors are mounted outside the door or window and its accompanying frame on the surface. The advantage to surface-mount door and window sensors is that they are very easy to install, and they can usually be mounted using double sided foam tape. But some users may not like how they are visible on the outside of the door or window. If you don't like the appearance of visible surface-mount door and window sensors, then you might instead consider recessed door and window sensors. A recessed door or window sensor is installed inside a door or window and its frame, so that it is hidden and cannot be seen from the outside. Recessed door and window sensors are more difficult and time-consuming to install, because you must drill holes in both the door or window and its accompanying frame. Whether you decide to use surface-mount door and window sensors, or recessed door and window sensors is up to you. Most DIY users and Alarm Grid customers in general will use surface-mount door and window sensors.

Now let's look at some door and window sensors.:

Sensor Name
Product Lineup
Compatibility Range
Encryption Installation
Notes
Honeywell SiXMINICT

Honeywell SiX Series Lyric 200 Nominal Feet 128-bit AES Surface-Mount Premier mini encrypted door/window Sensor for Lyric.
DSC PG9303

PowerG All IQ Panel 2 Plus 2,000 Feet Open Air 128-bit AES Surface-Mount PowerG encrypted surface mount door/window sensor.
DSC PG9307

PowerG All IQ Panel 2 Plus
2,000 Feet Open Air 128-bit AES Recessed PowerG encrypted recessed door/window sensor.
2GIG DW10e

2GIG eSeries 2GIG GC3e 350 Nominal Feet 2GIG eSeries Encryption Surface-Mount Encrypted surface-mount sensor for 2GIG
2GIG DW20e

2GIG eSeries
2GIG GC3e
350 Nominal Feet 2GIG eSeries Encryption
Recessed Encrypted recessed sensor for 2GIG
Qolsys IQ DW Mini-S

Qolsys S-Line 319.5 MHz IQ2+ 600 Feet Open Air Qolsys S-Line Encryption Surface-Mount Encrypted surface-mount sensor for 319.5 MHz systems.
Qolsys IQ Recessed Door-S

Qolsys S-Line 319.5 MHz IQ 2+ 600 Feet Open Air Qolsys S-Line Encryption Recessed Encrypted recessed sensor for 319.5 MHz systems.
Honeywell 5818MNL

Honeywell
5800 Series
Lyric, GC3e, 345 MHz IQ2+ 200 Nominal Feet None Recessed Non-Encrypted recessed door/window sensor for 345 MHz systems.
VERSA-2GIG

2GIG 345 MHz Lyric, GC3e, 345 MHz IQ2+ 200 Nominal Feet None Surface-Mount Non-encrypted surface-mount sensor for 345 MHz systems.
VERSA-GE

Legacy GE 319.5 MHz IQ2+ 200 Nominal Feet None Surface-Mount Non-encrypted surface-mount sensor for 319.5 MHz systems.
VERSA-DSC

Legacy DSC 433 MHz IQ2+ 200 Nominal Feet None Surface-Mount Non-encrypted surface-mount sensor for 433 MHz systems.

We also want to share a selection of outdoor door and window sensors with you. These surface-mount contact sensors are specifically designed to withstand the conditions of an outdoor environment, including intense rain, wind, dust, and sunlight. You can see them listed below.

Sensor Name
Product Lineup
Compatibility
Range
Encryption
Installation Notes
Honeywell 5816OD

Honeywell 5800 Series Lyric, GC3e, 345 MHz IQ2+ 200 Nominal Feet None Surface-Mount Outdoor contact sensor from 5800 Series.
DSC PG9312

PowerG All IQ Panel 2 Plus 2,000 Feet Open Air 128-bit AES Surface-Mount PowerG Outdoor Contact Sensor.
2GIG DW30-345

2GIG 345 MHz Lyric, GC3e, 345 MHz IQ2+ 350 Nominal Feet None Surface-Mount Outdoor contact sensor from 2GIG 345 MHz series.

Motion Sensors


Motion sensors use passive infrared (PIR) technology to detect movement within the sensor's coverage area. This is done by looking for the changes in infrared (IR) energy that occur when a person, animal, or object comes within the sensor's field of view. Standard motion sensors are typically PIR only. These are appropriately called PIR motion sensors.

Some motion sensors will also use microwave technology in addition to PIR technology. This involves having the sensor send out microwave signals and seeing how the signals bounce off of objects in the area. Movement will change the pattern of these microwave signals, and the sensor will be able to detect this. These motion sensors that use both microwave and PIR are called Dual-Tech motion sensors. The purpose of using both PIR and microwave together is to prevent false alarms. A Dual-Tech motion sensor will only activate and alert the system if both its PIR sensor and its microwave sensor are triggered. A microwave sensor is not vulnerable to the same environmental issues that may cause a false activation on a PIR. You will not find a motion sensor that uses microwave technology without PIR detection, as microwave alone would result in too many false alarms without having PIR to confirm movement.

One feature that you will often see listed on a motion sensor is pet-immunity. A motion sensor that has been set up for pet immunity can be configured to not "look" in the areas close to the ground where pets and small animals walk. Instead, the motion sensor only looks in the areas higher up, where humans move while walking upright. A pet immune motion sensor is not impervious to small animals, and you must position it carefully so that it works as intended. Pet immune motion sensors normally have a weight limit, where animals under that weight limit should avoid triggering the sensor, assuming that the sensor is installed properly. Please note that most pet friendly motion sensors will require you to set the sensitivity for the sensor to the lowest possible setting.

When it comes to motion sensors, mounting them carefully is very important. A motion sensor may cause false alarms on the system if it is not installed properly. These sensors should not be facing any vents, air ducts, ceiling fans, or curtains that may cause the sensor to activate without any movement. If you are using the motion sensor for pet immunity, then it should also not be facing any furniture or stairwells that your pet could use to get within the sensor's field of view. You will likely want to perform a Walk Test of your motion sensor to make sure that it responds properly when movement is present, and does not respond due to other external factors when there is no movement. You should also have any pets participate in the Walk Test to ensure that pet immunity is working properly.

We recommend reading the following FAQs to learn more about motion sensors:

Below are some of the most popular motion sensors for our recommended systems:

Sensor Name Product Lineup
Compatibility Range
Encryption Coverage Area
Detection Type
Pet Immunity Notes
Honeywell SiXPIR

Honeywell SiX Series Lyric 300 Nominal Feet 128-bit AES 40 by 56 Feet
PIR Up to 80 lbs Encrypted PIR Motion for Lyric.
DSC PG9914

PowerG All IQ Panel 2 Plus 2,000 Feet Open Air 128-bit AES Up to 39 Feet PIR Up to 85 lbs PowerG Encrypted PIR Motion.
DSC PG9984P

PowerG All IQ Panel 2 Plus 2,000 Feet Open Air 128-bit AES Up to 50 Feet Dual-Tech Up to 40 lbs PowerG Encrypted Dual-Tech Motion.
2GIG PIR1e

2GIG eSeries 2GIG GC3e 350 Nominal Feet 2GIG eSeries Encryption
30 by 50 Feet PIR Up to 55 lbs Encrypted PIR Motion for 2GIG.
Honeywell 5800PIR-RES

Honeywell 5800 Series Lyric, GC3e, 345 MHz IQ2+ 200 Nominal Feet None 35 by 40 Feet PIR Up to 80 lbs Non-encrypted residential PIR motion for 345 MHz systems.
Honeywell 5800PIR-COM

Honeywell 5800 Series Lyric, GC3e, 345 MHz, IQ2+ 200 Nominal Feet None 60 by 80 Feet PIR None Non-encrypted commercial PIR motion for 345 MHz systems.
Honeywell 5898

Honeywell 5800 Series Lyric, GC3e, 345 MHz IQ2+ 200 Nominal Feet None 35 by 40 Feet for Pet Immunity Dual-Tech Up to 100 lbs Non-encrypted Dual-Tech motion for 345 MHz systems.
Qolsys IQ Motion-S

Qolsys S-Line 319.5 MHz IQ2+ 600 Feet Open Air Qolsys S-Line Encryption 30 by 40 Feet PIR Up to 40 lbs Non-encrypted PIR motion for 319.5 MHz systems.

There are also certain outdoor motion detection sensors that are better-suited for use in an outdoor environment. These outdoor motion sensor models are typically more expensive than indoor variants. You can see some of our most popular ones listed below:

Sensor Name
Product Lineup
Compatibility Range
Encryption Coverage Area
Detection Type
Pet Immunity Notes
DSC PG9994

PowerG All IQ Panel 2 Plus 2,000 Feet Open Air 128-bit AES Up to 30 Feet PIR Up to 40 lbs PowerG Outdoor PIR Motion Sensor
Honeywell 5800PIR-OD

Honeywell 5800 Series Lyric, GC3e, 345 MHz IQ2+ 200 Nominal Feet None 40 by 30 Feet PIR None Honeywell 5800 Series Outdoor Motion, 1st ed.
Honeywell 5800PIR-OD2

Honeywell 5800 Series Lyric, GC3e, 345 MHz IQ2+ 200 Nominal Feet None 40 by 30 Feet PIR None Honeywell 5800 Series Outdoor Motion, 2nd ed.
Optex FTN-RRIX

Legacy Interlogix 319.5 MHz IQ2+ 200 Nominal Feet None Up to 16.5 Feet PIR None Optex Fitlink Outdoor Motion Sensor for 319.5 MHz Systems
Optex FTN-RR2G

2GIG 345 MHz Lyric, GC3e, 345 MHz IQ2+ 200 Nominal Feet None Up to 16.5 Feet PIR None Optex Fitlink Outdoor Motion Sensor for 345 MHz Systems.
Optex FTN-RRDS

Legacy DSC 433 MHz IQ2+ 200 Nominal Feet None Up to 16.5 Feet PIR None Optex Fitlink Outdoor Motion Sensor for 433 MHz Systems.

Glass Break Sensors

The last type of security sensors we will be discussing are glass break sensors. These sensors include built-in microphones, and they actively listen for the unique sound of glass breaking. Most of these sensors will need to hear both the high-pitched shattering sound of the glass breaking, as well as the low-pitched sound of an object striking against the glass in order to activate. This design choice is to prevent false alarms caused by similar sounds. Most users will use glass break sensors to monitor windows, but they have also been known to work effectively on protective glass display cases that store valuables, such as what you might find in jewelry stores or gun shops. Most types of glass will work with glass break sensors, though there are some exceptions. For example double and triple pane glass windows won't work reliably. The same is true for coated or "safety" glass. Refer to the manual for the exact glass break detector you are using to determine compatibility.

A single glass break detector can monitor multiple windows or display cases, as long as the glass it is monitoring is within its detection range, which is typically 15 to 25 feet. Any glass that is being monitored must have a direct line of sight with the sensor, with no obstacles blocking the path that sound will travel through. When testing your glass break sensors, it is strongly recommended that you us a glass break simulator. These devices will mimic the sound of the glass breaking and activate your glass break sensors without actually breaking any glass. Remember to refer the instructions of your glass break simulator for more information. When choosing a glass break simulator, it is best to use a simulator from the same manufacturer, if possible. We have a Honeywell Glass Break Simulator and a DSC Glass Break Simulator available on our website. If you get one of the 2GIG Glass Break Sensors mentioned in this buying guide, then the Honeywell Glass Break Simulator is best for testing. Otherwise, just match the manufacturer.

Below are some of our most popular glass break sensors:

Sensor Name
Product Lineup
Compatibility
Range
Encryption
Notes
Honeywell SiXGB

Honeywell SiX Series Lyric 300 Nominal Feet 128-bit AES SiX Series Glass Break Sensor for Lyric
DSC PG922

PowerG All IQ Panel 2 Plus 2,000 Feet Open Air 128-bit AES PowerG Glass Break Sensor
2GIG GB1e

2GIG eSeries 2GIG GC3e 350 Nominal Feet 2GIG eSeries Encryption Encrypted glass break sensor for 2GIG.
Honeywell 5853

Honeywell 5800 Series Lyric, GC3e, 345 MHz IQ2+ 200 Nominal Feet None Non-encrypted glass break sensor for 345 MHz systems.
Qolsys IQ Glass-S

Qolsys S-Line 319.5 MHz IQ2+ 600 Feet Open Air Qolsys S-Line Encryption Encrypted glass break sensor for 319.5 MHz systems.

Reach Out to Us!


Remember that you can reach out to us with any questions you might have about planning your system and determining sensor compatibility. The best way to contact us is to email support@alarmgrid.com. This is also a good email to use if you are interested in starting new alarm monitoring service with Alarm Grid. Our team checks for new email from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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We have heard reports lately of RF supervision troubles on 2GIG GC2e and 2GIG GC3e Systems, particularly for zones set up with encrypted 2GIG eSeries Sensors. Upon further testing, we have learned that eSeries Zones configured with incorrect Equipment Codes can cause supervision trouble.

2gig pir1e wireless encrypted pir motion detector

Equipment Codes are somewhat of a unique quirk for 2GIG Security Systems. This numeric code identifies the model number of the wireless sensor that is being used. It should not be confused with the sensor's Serial Number, which is unique for each individual sensor. You set the Equipment Code when programming a new zone. Alarm Grid has helpful guides available for programming a GC2e zone and programming a GC3e zone.

The following table contains the current list of eSeries Equipment Codes:

Product Name Equipment Code
2GIG eSeries Smoke Detector (USA) 2058
2GIG eSeries CO Detector (USA) 2860
2GIG eSeries Tilt Sensor 2061
2GIG eSeries Flood Sensor 2065
2GIG eSeries Shock Sensor 2066
2GIG eSeries Repeater 2067
2GIG eSeries Translator 2068
2GIG eSeries Water Sensor 2070
2GIG eSeries Thin Door/Window Contact 2862
2GIG eSeries Recessed Door Contact 2863
2GIG eSeries Glass Break Detector 2864
2GIG eSeries Pet-Immune PIR Motion Sensor 2869
2GIG eSeries Takeover Module 2873
2GIG eSeries 4-Button Keyfob Remote 2866

Before the rise of 2GIG eSeries Encrypted Sensors, the Equipment Code setting on a 2GIG System was largely seen as a formality. The general practice was to find the corresponding sensor if available, but generally not worry about it very much if you couldn't match it exactly. Some third-party sensors do not have their own Equipment Codes, and an "equivalent" is usually selected instead. For example, the Honeywell 5800MINI and the VERSA-2GIG can both just use the Equipment Code for "Existing Door/Window Contact", rather than finding an exact match.

But for the 2GIG eSeries Sensors, the Equipment Code selection is actually very important. Failing to set the exact corresponding equipment code can result in the system displaying an RF supervision loss trouble condition for the associated zone. This trouble is typically used to identify that the system has lost communication with the sensor, due to either the sensor powering down from a dead or missing battery, or the sensor being taken out of wireless range. But it seems that the GC2e and GC3e cannot properly supervise a 2GIG eSeries Sensor with an improper Equipment Code. More information can be found in this FAQ.

Missing Equipment Codes are more common for third-party sensors not produced by 2GIG. For a 2GIG Sensor, you should almost always have a direct Equipment Code selection available. And the 2GIG eSeries Sensors are still quite new, so 2GIG made sure to put in Equipment Codes specifically for each of these sensors. However, you may be unable to find an Equipment Code for a brand-new eSeries Sensor if your 2GIG System isn't on the latest firmware version. Adding support for new sensors is a major part of most 2GIG Firmware Updates. You can view our GC2e Firmware Page here, and our GC3e Firmware Page here.

If you need any help programming a GC2e or GC3e wireless zone, then make sure to check out the programming FAQs we linked earlier. Alarm Grid monitored customers can also receive additional free support by emailing support@alarmgrid.com. This is also a great email to use if you are interested in signing up for new monitoring service. We check our email from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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With a new year comes reduced pricing on many of our great existing products. We have just dropped the prices on 73 of our existing offerings. You can certainly find something great to upgrade your existing system or use with a new installation. Let's check out these awesome products!


Before we go through and list each and every reduced price product, we figured we'd go through and talk about some of the ones that excite us the most. After all, sorting through a list of 73 products is pretty daunting. Our initial "best-of" list may help you find exactly what you're looking for. These products are great if you have an existing system, or if you are building a new system and want to add some cool accessories.

These products are presented in alphabetical order:

Alarm.com ADC-V723 Outdoor Camera


The ADC-V723 is the current flagship outdoor security camera for use with the Alarm.com platform. This simple, yet powerful camera makes the perfect addition to any home or small business. It can capture video at up to 1080p quality, and it makes use of High Dynamic Range (HDR) to improve image depth and luminosity.

Alarm.com T2000 Smart Z-Wave Thermostat

Alarm dot com t2000 smart thermostat


If you are still looking for a smart Z-Wave thermostat, then the ADC-T2000 is an outstanding entry-level option. It conveniently wires in place of your existing thermostat to give you smart control over your HVAC system. It can pair nicely with both the Alarm.com and Total Connect 2.0 platforms. You just need a compatible Z-Wave hub to get started.

DSC PG9312 Outdoor Door/Window Sensor

Dsc pg9312 wireless powerg outdoor door slash window contact


The DSC PG9312 is the premier outdoor contact sensor for any user with a PowerG-compatible security system. It offers a maximum magnet spacing gap of 1.75", which gives you more flexibility in choosing a location for the sensor and magnet. Like all PowerG Sensors, it offers a wireless range of up to 2 km away from the panel, as well as 128-bit AES encryption.

DSC PG9914 Motion Sensor

Dsc pg9914 powerg 915mhz out wireless motion detector


Anyone with a PowerG Security System looking to add a basic indoor motion sensor should turn to the DSC PG9914. This is a simple, yet effective motion sensor that is great for use in nearly any home or business. It offers a modest coverage area of 39 feet, and the sensor provides pet immunity for small animals weighing up to 85 lbs.

Encore FireFighter FF345 Smoke/CO Listening Module

Encore firefighter ff345 circular smoke detector takeover module


The Encore FireFighter FF345 is perfect if you have existing high-voltage smoke detectors that you want to integrate into a 345 MHz wireless system. The module can detect both the Temporal 3 sound of an activated smoke detector and the Temporal 4 sound of an activated CO detector. And if your high-voltage devices are one-go-all-go, then a single FF345 can takeover your entire network.

Honeywell 5822T Garage Door Tilt Sensor

Honeywell 5822t wireless garage tilt sensor


Also for 345 MHz system users, the Honeywell 5822T allows your system to monitor your garage door to see if it's opened or closed. This wireless sensor works great for security and automation purposes alike. You might even create a special smart scene that activates as soon as the 5822T detects that you garage door has been opened!

Honeywell IPCAM-WIC1 Indoor Camera

Honeywell lyric c1 wifi indoor 720p hd total connect security ca


The Honeywell IPCAM-WIC1 Indoor Camera is for anyone with an existing Total Connect 2.0 Video Monitoring service plan that they want to expand upon. This is a simple and straightforward camera that captures video at up to 720p quality. It can be easily rested on a desk or table, and no hard-mounting is required.

Qolsys IQ DW MINI-S Door/Window Sensor

Qolsys iq dw mini s encrypted wireless sensors for iq panel 2 qs


The Qolsys IQ DW MINI-S can be used by anyone with a 319.5 MHz wireless system, including the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus w/ Legacy Interlogix & Qolsys Daughtercard. This is a straightforward door and window contact sensor that makes a nice addition to any compatible system. Its small and compact design allows for a tidy installation.

Please see our complete list of reduced price products in the table below, organized by product type:

Product Type
Products
Alarm Panels (6)
Cameras, Image Sensors, & Accessories (6)
Communicators (5)
Door/Window Sensors (8)
Environmental Sensors (2)
Garage Door Sensors (1)

Glass Break Detectors (5)
Hardwired Zone Expanders (2)
Home Automation & Smart Home (4)

Life-Safety Products (5)
Key Fobs & Panic Buttons (2)
Keypads & Desk Mounts (3)
Motion Sensors (8)
Power Supplies & Relays (2)
Sirens & Speakers (6)
Wireless Converters, Receivers, Repeaters & Translators

If you have any questions about these products or any of the other products on our site, including product compatibilities, please reach out to us. You may also contact us if you want to learn more about our monitoring services. The best way to reach us is to email support@alarmgrid.com. Or you may call us at (888) 818-7728. Remember that our support hours run from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to helping you find the perfect product for your needs!

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Hi DIYers! As you know, you can't have a security system without some sensors! Of course, with all the possible sensor types it can be overwhelming to decide which ones you really need for your system. While nearly every sensor type serves a purpose, these are the 5 we deem most crucial.

Alarm grid inside security stickers

5. Glass Break Sensors

Glass break sensors are used to detect broken windows and other glass break events. These devices have built-in microphones, and they actively listen for the sound of breaking glass. Most glass break sensors utilize a dual-sound detection method. This means that the sensor must detect both the low-pitched thud of an object striking against the glass and the high-pitched shattering of the glass itself. This helps prevent false alarms. Glass break sensors are perfect for monitoring for forced entry into your home. You can even use a single glass break sensor to monitor multiple windows in the same room!

2gig gb1 wireless glass break detector

4. Environmental Sensors

Environmental sensors include devices like temperature sensors and flood sensors. These sensors monitor for unusual environmental conditions that likely indicate a problem. For example, a flood sensor will let your system know if there is a water leak that could lead to expensive water damage. Meanwhile, a temperature sensor will monitor for unusually high or low temperatures that indicate a broken HVAC system. There are also many environmental sensors that can perform dual functions and operate as both temperature and flood sensors.

Honeywell 5821 wireless temperature sensor and water sensor exte


3. Life-Safety Sensors

Life-safety sensors are used to monitor for life-threatening environmental conditions, such as a fire or an outbreak of carbon monoxide gas. These include devices like smoke and heat detectors and carbon monoxide sensors. There are also special combination CO and smoke detectors that can monitor for multiple types of life-safety conditions. Enrolling properly functioning life-safety sensors with your system can mean the difference between life and death. And for fires, you will be able to ensure a faster response if one occurs while you are away. These are a must-have for any system.

Honeywell 5800combo smoke heat and co detector

2. Motion Detection Sensors

Motion sensors are some of the most useful sensors you can add to your system. These devices alert the system upon detecting a change in infrared (IR) energy caused by movement. There are also some motion sensors that use microwave radar technology in addition to passive infrared (PIR). You can install motions inside your home as interior sensors to determine if anyone gains entry while you are away. They are perfect for detecting general activity and movement in areas where none should be present. There are even pet-immune motion sensors so that you won't need to worry about your pets setting them off. Just make sure you choose the installation area carefully.

Qolsys qs1231 840 iq motion s encrypted motion sensor

1. Door & Window Contacts

Door and window contacts are the easiest to use and most effective sensors for any alarm system. They are used for letting your system know if someone opens up a door or window. These sensors usually consist of two parts, which are a sensor and a magnet. The sensor goes on the door or window frame, and the magnet goes on the moving part of the door or window. Opening the door or window will cause the magnet to become separated from the sensor. The sensor will detect this and alert the system. There are also recessed door and window sensors that allow for a more aesthetically- pleasing installation!

Honeywell sixct wireless door slash window contact for lyric con

Remember, our goal at Alarm Grid is to set you up with the perfect security system for your needs. We also offer top-quality alarm monitoring services that are great for pairing with a new or existing alarm system. If you ever need help designing or using your security system, or if you want to learn more about our monitoring services, please reach out to us! We are best reached by email at support@alarmgrid.com. Or you may call us at (888) 818-7728 during our regular business hours of 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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Hi DIYers! We are happy to announce that the first 2GIG Encrypted Sensors are available on our site. The lineup includes two contacts, a motion, a key fob, and a glass break. Anyone with a 2GIG GC2e or 2GIG GC3e System will absolutely want to make use of these powerful new sensors.


The new 2GIG eSeries Encrypted Sensors represent perhaps the biggest selling point of the new 2GIG Alarm Systems. These sensors are designed exclusively for use with the 2GIG GC2e and 2GIG GC3e. When enrolled, they will make use of encryption in all their wireless communication. This makes these sensors virtually impervious to any wireless hacking or takeover attempts. This is the best way to ensure that your system is always protected.

It is important to note that you cannot bring these sensors over to the older 2GIG Go!Control GC2 and 2GIG GC3 Systems and expect them to work as non-encrypted wireless sensors. These new sensors can only be utilized as encrypted devices on the GC2e and GC3e Systems. However, you can bring over the older 2GIG Sensors and the Honeywell 5800 Sensors and use them with the GC2e and GC3e as standard 345 MHz sensors.

With that out of the way, let's start checking out the new encrypted sensors!

2GIG DW10e



The 2GIG DW10e is a surface-mounted door and window contact sensor. It offers a super thin profile, with dimensions of 2.59"L x 1.03"W x 0.49"D. This makes the sensor practically invisible when mounted flat on a white surface. There are two programmable loops for the DW10e. One loop will have the sensor operate as a standard contact with a reed switch. The other loop allows you to connect a single Normally Closed (NC) hardwired contact to the DW10e and have it communicate with the panel wirelessly.

2GIG DW20e



The 2GIG DW20e is a recessed door and window contact that is perfect for users who want to achieve a more aesthetically pleasing installation. The sensor and its accompanying magnet need to be inserted into holes that are drilled into the door or window and its frame. The only way to see the sensor after installation is to look at the door or window frame from the side when the door or window is already opened. The DW20e has an impressive 450-foot wireless range when used with direct line of sight.

2GIG PIR1e



The 2GIG PIR1e is a wireless PIR motion detection sensor. The device works by looking for the changes in IR energy that occur with movement. It uses a quad-element PIR sensor for superb reliability. The trustworthy and reliable motion detecting sensor offers a coverage area of 30' by 50'. This is perfect for a home or small business. There are three different sensitivity settings you can choose from. When used on low sensitivity, the device will provide pet immunity for small animals weighing up to 55 pounds.

2GIG GB1e



The 2GIG GB1e is a wireless glass break sensor. The device will effectively monitor plate, tempered, and sealed insulating glass that measures between 1/8 and 1/4 of an inch thick. The sensor listens for both the low-pitched "thud" of an object striking the glass and the higher-pitched "shattering" of the glass itself. This dual-detection process helps to ensure that false alarms do not occur. It is great for monitoring windows for forced entry, but it can also be used with protective glass casings that display products.

2GIG KEY2e



The 2GIG KEY2e is a wireless 4-button key fob that gives you a convenient way to control your GC2e or GC3e while you are on-site. There are dedicated buttons for Arming Away, Arming Stay, Disarming, and activating a relay device. You can also program a dual-button press of the top two buttons (Arm Away and Disarm) to trigger an instant panic. Any button must be held down for a full 2 seconds for the command to go through. This helps to prevent accidental inputs. It has a wireless range of 350 feet.

If you have questions about any of these new 2GIG eSeries Sensors or the 2GIG GC2e and GC3e, or if you just want to learn more about our monitoring service, please reach out to us! We are here to make sure you get the perfect equipment for your needs. The best way to contact us is always to email support@alarmgrid.com. If you want to speak by phone, you can reach us at (888) 818-7728 during our regular business hours of 9am to 8pm EST. We look forward to hearing from you!

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