Encrypted Glass Break Detectors Posts

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We have heard reports lately of RF supervision troubles on 2GIG GC2e and 2GIG GC3e Systems, particularly for zones set up with encrypted 2GIG eSeries Sensors. Upon further testing, we have learned that eSeries Zones configured with incorrect Equipment Codes can cause supervision trouble.

2gig pir1e wireless encrypted pir motion detector

Equipment Codes are somewhat of a unique quirk for 2GIG Security Systems. This numeric code identifies the model number of the wireless sensor that is being used. It should not be confused with the sensor's Serial Number, which is unique for each individual sensor. You set the Equipment Code when programming a new zone. Alarm Grid has helpful guides available for programming a GC2e zone and programming a GC3e zone.

The following table contains the current list of eSeries Equipment Codes:

Product Name Equipment Code
2GIG eSeries Smoke Detector (USA) 2058
2GIG eSeries CO Detector (USA) 2860
2GIG eSeries Tilt Sensor 2061
2GIG eSeries Flood Sensor 2065
2GIG eSeries Shock Sensor 2066
2GIG eSeries Repeater 2067
2GIG eSeries Translator 2068
2GIG eSeries Water Sensor 2070
2GIG eSeries Thin Door/Window Contact 2862
2GIG eSeries Recessed Door Contact 2863
2GIG eSeries Glass Break Detector 2864
2GIG eSeries Pet-Immune PIR Motion Sensor 2869
2GIG eSeries Takeover Module 2873
2GIG eSeries 4-Button Keyfob Remote 2866

Before the rise of 2GIG eSeries Encrypted Sensors, the Equipment Code setting on a 2GIG System was largely seen as a formality. The general practice was to find the corresponding sensor if available, but generally not worry about it very much if you couldn't match it exactly. Some third-party sensors do not have their own Equipment Codes, and an "equivalent" is usually selected instead. For example, the Honeywell 5800MINI and the VERSA-2GIG can both just use the Equipment Code for "Existing Door/Window Contact", rather than finding an exact match.

But for the 2GIG eSeries Sensors, the Equipment Code selection is actually very important. Failing to set the exact corresponding equipment code can result in the system displaying an RF supervision loss trouble condition for the associated zone. This trouble is typically used to identify that the system has lost communication with the sensor, due to either the sensor powering down from a dead or missing battery, or the sensor being taken out of wireless range. But it seems that the GC2e and GC3e cannot properly supervise a 2GIG eSeries Sensor with an improper Equipment Code. More information can be found in this FAQ.

Missing Equipment Codes are more common for third-party sensors not produced by 2GIG. For a 2GIG Sensor, you should almost always have a direct Equipment Code selection available. And the 2GIG eSeries Sensors are still quite new, so 2GIG made sure to put in Equipment Codes specifically for each of these sensors. However, you may be unable to find an Equipment Code for a brand-new eSeries Sensor if your 2GIG System isn't on the latest firmware version. Adding support for new sensors is a major part of most 2GIG Firmware Updates. You can view our GC2e Firmware Page here, and our GC3e Firmware Page here.

If you need any help programming a GC2e or GC3e wireless zone, then make sure to check out the programming FAQs we linked earlier. Alarm Grid monitored customers can also receive additional free support by emailing support@alarmgrid.com. This is also a great email to use if you are interested in signing up for new monitoring service. We check our email from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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We have heard reports lately of RF supervision troubles on 2GIG GC2e and 2GIG GC3e Systems, particularly for zones set up with encrypted 2GIG eSeries Sensors. Upon further testing, we have learned that eSeries Zones configured with incorrect Equipment Codes can cause supervision trouble.

2gig pir1e wireless encrypted pir motion detector

Equipment Codes are somewhat of a unique quirk for 2GIG Security Systems. This numeric code identifies the model number of the wireless sensor that is being used. It should not be confused with the sensor's Serial Number, which is unique for each individual sensor. You set the Equipment Code when programming a new zone. Alarm Grid has helpful guides available for programming a GC2e zone and programming a GC3e zone.

The following table contains the current list of eSeries Equipment Codes:

Product Name Equipment Code
2GIG eSeries Smoke Detector (USA) 2058
2GIG eSeries CO Detector (USA) 2860
2GIG eSeries Tilt Sensor 2061
2GIG eSeries Flood Sensor 2065
2GIG eSeries Shock Sensor 2066
2GIG eSeries Repeater 2067
2GIG eSeries Translator 2068
2GIG eSeries Water Sensor 2070
2GIG eSeries Thin Door/Window Contact 2862
2GIG eSeries Recessed Door Contact 2863
2GIG eSeries Glass Break Detector 2864
2GIG eSeries Pet-Immune PIR Motion Sensor 2869
2GIG eSeries Takeover Module 2873
2GIG eSeries 4-Button Keyfob Remote 2866

Before the rise of 2GIG eSeries Encrypted Sensors, the Equipment Code setting on a 2GIG System was largely seen as a formality. The general practice was to find the corresponding sensor if available, but generally not worry about it very much if you couldn't match it exactly. Some third-party sensors do not have their own Equipment Codes, and an "equivalent" is usually selected instead. For example, the Honeywell 5800MINI and the VERSA-2GIG can both just use the Equipment Code for "Existing Door/Window Contact", rather than finding an exact match.

But for the 2GIG eSeries Sensors, the Equipment Code selection is actually very important. Failing to set the exact corresponding equipment code can result in the system displaying an RF supervision loss trouble condition for the associated zone. This trouble is typically used to identify that the system has lost communication with the sensor, due to either the sensor powering down from a dead or missing battery, or the sensor being taken out of wireless range. But it seems that the GC2e and GC3e cannot properly supervise a 2GIG eSeries Sensor with an improper Equipment Code. More information can be found in this FAQ.

Missing Equipment Codes are more common for third-party sensors not produced by 2GIG. For a 2GIG Sensor, you should almost always have a direct Equipment Code selection available. And the 2GIG eSeries Sensors are still quite new, so 2GIG made sure to put in Equipment Codes specifically for each of these sensors. However, you may be unable to find an Equipment Code for a brand-new eSeries Sensor if your 2GIG System isn't on the latest firmware version. Adding support for new sensors is a major part of most 2GIG Firmware Updates. You can view our GC2e Firmware Page here, and our GC3e Firmware Page here.

If you need any help programming a GC2e or GC3e wireless zone, then make sure to check out the programming FAQs we linked earlier. Alarm Grid monitored customers can also receive additional free support by emailing support@alarmgrid.com. This is also a great email to use if you are interested in signing up for new monitoring service. We check our email from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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Hi DIYers! We are happy to announce that the first 2GIG Encrypted Sensors are available on our site. The lineup includes two contacts, a motion, a key fob, and a glass break. Anyone with a 2GIG GC2e or 2GIG GC3e System will absolutely want to make use of these powerful new sensors.


The new 2GIG eSeries Encrypted Sensors represent perhaps the biggest selling point of the new 2GIG Alarm Systems. These sensors are designed exclusively for use with the 2GIG GC2e and 2GIG GC3e. When enrolled, they will make use of encryption in all their wireless communication. This makes these sensors virtually impervious to any wireless hacking or takeover attempts. This is the best way to ensure that your system is always protected.

It is important to note that you cannot bring these sensors over to the older 2GIG Go!Control GC2 and 2GIG GC3 Systems and expect them to work as non-encrypted wireless sensors. These new sensors can only be utilized as encrypted devices on the GC2e and GC3e Systems. However, you can bring over the older 2GIG Sensors and the Honeywell 5800 Sensors and use them with the GC2e and GC3e as standard 345 MHz sensors.

With that out of the way, let's start checking out the new encrypted sensors!

2GIG DW10e



The 2GIG DW10e is a surface-mounted door and window contact sensor. It offers a super thin profile, with dimensions of 2.59"L x 1.03"W x 0.49"D. This makes the sensor practically invisible when mounted flat on a white surface. There are two programmable loops for the DW10e. One loop will have the sensor operate as a standard contact with a reed switch. The other loop allows you to connect a single Normally Closed (NC) hardwired contact to the DW10e and have it communicate with the panel wirelessly.

2GIG DW20e



The 2GIG DW20e is a recessed door and window contact that is perfect for users who want to achieve a more aesthetically pleasing installation. The sensor and its accompanying magnet need to be inserted into holes that are drilled into the door or window and its frame. The only way to see the sensor after installation is to look at the door or window frame from the side when the door or window is already opened. The DW20e has an impressive 450-foot wireless range when used with direct line of sight.

2GIG PIR1e



The 2GIG PIR1e is a wireless PIR motion detection sensor. The device works by looking for the changes in IR energy that occur with movement. It uses a quad-element PIR sensor for superb reliability. The trustworthy and reliable motion detecting sensor offers a coverage area of 30' by 50'. This is perfect for a home or small business. There are three different sensitivity settings you can choose from. When used on low sensitivity, the device will provide pet immunity for small animals weighing up to 55 pounds.

2GIG GB1e



The 2GIG GB1e is a wireless glass break sensor. The device will effectively monitor plate, tempered, and sealed insulating glass that measures between 1/8 and 1/4 of an inch thick. The sensor listens for both the low-pitched "thud" of an object striking the glass and the higher-pitched "shattering" of the glass itself. This dual-detection process helps to ensure that false alarms do not occur. It is great for monitoring windows for forced entry, but it can also be used with protective glass casings that display products.

2GIG KEY2e



The 2GIG KEY2e is a wireless 4-button key fob that gives you a convenient way to control your GC2e or GC3e while you are on-site. There are dedicated buttons for Arming Away, Arming Stay, Disarming, and activating a relay device. You can also program a dual-button press of the top two buttons (Arm Away and Disarm) to trigger an instant panic. Any button must be held down for a full 2 seconds for the command to go through. This helps to prevent accidental inputs. It has a wireless range of 350 feet.

If you have questions about any of these new 2GIG eSeries Sensors or the 2GIG GC2e and GC3e, or if you just want to learn more about our monitoring service, please reach out to us! We are here to make sure you get the perfect equipment for your needs. The best way to contact us is always to email support@alarmgrid.com. If you want to speak by phone, you can reach us at (888) 818-7728 during our regular business hours of 9am to 8pm EST. We look forward to hearing from you!

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Hi DIYers! Our YouTube Channel uploaded a sound clip that mimics the sound of breaking glass. This sound clip can be used to test various glass break detectors for proper function. This includes both external glass break sensors and the internal glass break sensor for the Qolsys IQ Panel 2.


Although this might just sound like a generic glass break effect, it was actually specifically designed for testing glass break sensors. It includes both the low-pitched "thud" of an object striking against the glass, as well as the high-pitched "shattering" sound that is most commonly associated with breaking glass.

In order to test one of your glass break sensors, start by putting your system on test mode with the central station. Next, pull up the YouTube clip on your phone, and set your phone's volume to its highest setting. Then play the clip in its entirety while you are within the detection range of your glass break sensor. If successful, the sensor will send an alert to the control panel to let it know that it has been activated. You might want to test the sensor from multiple locations to make sure that it will properly respond to glass breaking from different directions.

Keep in mind that if the glass break sensor does not activate during testing, it does not necessarily mean that your glass break sensor isn't working properly. It may just need to have its settings adjusted, or you may need to change its location. Also, it's very important to mention that we recommend using a conventional glass break simulator, such as a Honeywell FG701 or an Interlogix 5709C-W if possible. This sound clip is only alternative option if a user has no other way of testing their sensor. Although the clip should work well, it will not work as effectively as a legitimate testing device.

We hope this clip will be helpful for users who need to test their glass break sensors. If you need any help, please contact us at 888-818-7728 M-F from 9am to 8pm EST or email us any time at support@alarmgrid.com.

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