2GIG SMKT8e-345 Posts

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We have heard reports lately of RF supervision troubles on 2GIG GC2e and 2GIG GC3e Systems, particularly for zones set up with encrypted 2GIG eSeries Sensors. Upon further testing, we have learned that eSeries Zones configured with incorrect Equipment Codes can cause supervision trouble.

2gig pir1e wireless encrypted pir motion detector

Equipment Codes are somewhat of a unique quirk for 2GIG Security Systems. This numeric code identifies the model number of the wireless sensor that is being used. It should not be confused with the sensor's Serial Number, which is unique for each individual sensor. You set the Equipment Code when programming a new zone. Alarm Grid has helpful guides available for programming a GC2e zone and programming a GC3e zone.

The following table contains the current list of eSeries Equipment Codes:

Product Name Equipment Code
2GIG eSeries Smoke Detector (USA) 2058
2GIG eSeries CO Detector (USA) 2860
2GIG eSeries Tilt Sensor 2061
2GIG eSeries Flood Sensor 2065
2GIG eSeries Shock Sensor 2066
2GIG eSeries Repeater 2067
2GIG eSeries Translator 2068
2GIG eSeries Water Sensor 2070
2GIG eSeries Thin Door/Window Contact 2862
2GIG eSeries Recessed Door Contact 2863
2GIG eSeries Glass Break Detector 2864
2GIG eSeries Pet-Immune PIR Motion Sensor 2869
2GIG eSeries Takeover Module 2873
2GIG eSeries 4-Button Keyfob Remote 2866

Before the rise of 2GIG eSeries Encrypted Sensors, the Equipment Code setting on a 2GIG System was largely seen as a formality. The general practice was to find the corresponding sensor if available, but generally not worry about it very much if you couldn't match it exactly. Some third-party sensors do not have their own Equipment Codes, and an "equivalent" is usually selected instead. For example, the Honeywell 5800MINI and the VERSA-2GIG can both just use the Equipment Code for "Existing Door/Window Contact", rather than finding an exact match.

But for the 2GIG eSeries Sensors, the Equipment Code selection is actually very important. Failing to set the exact corresponding equipment code can result in the system displaying an RF supervision loss trouble condition for the associated zone. This trouble is typically used to identify that the system has lost communication with the sensor, due to either the sensor powering down from a dead or missing battery, or the sensor being taken out of wireless range. But it seems that the GC2e and GC3e cannot properly supervise a 2GIG eSeries Sensor with an improper Equipment Code. More information can be found in this FAQ.

Missing Equipment Codes are more common for third-party sensors not produced by 2GIG. For a 2GIG Sensor, you should almost always have a direct Equipment Code selection available. And the 2GIG eSeries Sensors are still quite new, so 2GIG made sure to put in Equipment Codes specifically for each of these sensors. However, you may be unable to find an Equipment Code for a brand-new eSeries Sensor if your 2GIG System isn't on the latest firmware version. Adding support for new sensors is a major part of most 2GIG Firmware Updates. You can view our GC2e Firmware Page here, and our GC3e Firmware Page here.

If you need any help programming a GC2e or GC3e wireless zone, then make sure to check out the programming FAQs we linked earlier. Alarm Grid monitored customers can also receive additional free support by emailing support@alarmgrid.com. This is also a great email to use if you are interested in signing up for new monitoring service. We check our email from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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For users looking to add smoke and heat detectors to their wireless systems, there are always some great options to consider. Of course, the specific models you can choose from will depend which alarm panel you are using. We're here to present the best options for some popular systems.

Honeywell 5800combo smoke heat and co detector

For this list, we are presenting our favorite combination smoke and heat detector and standalone heat detector for each system. Combination smoke and heat detectors are what you should use in most locations of your home or business. During a fire, smoke is usually detected before heat, so a combination sensor will rely on smoke detection as its primary method for detecting fires. Heat detection serves as a good backup to smoke detection.

But there are some rooms of a home where it is better to use standalone heat detectors. This is because using a regular smoke detector in these rooms could result in false alarms due to excessive dust, moisture, or smoke that is normally present. Examples of rooms where a standalone heat detector is often a better option include kitchens, attics, garages, and bathrooms. Remember that standalone heat sensors are one-and-done devices, and they must be replaced after activation. Do not test them using a hair dryer!

Below are our favorite smoke and heat detector options for various systems:


Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus (319.5 MHz)

Smoke & Heat: DSC PG9936

Standalone Heat: Interlogix HDX-135


Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus (345 MHz)

Smoke & Heat: DSC PG9936

Standalone Heat: Honeywell 5809SS


Honeywell Lyric Alarm System

Smoke & Heat: Honeywell SiXSMOKE

Standalone Heat: Honeywell 5809SS


2GIG GC3e & 2GIG GC2e

Smoke & Heat: 2GIG SMKT8e-345

Standalone Heat: Honeywell 5809SS


If you need any help setting up your new Alarm Grid Security System, or if you are interested in learning more about our monitoring services, please email us at support@alarmgrid.com. We check our email from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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Hi DIYers! Today, we're taking a look at the 2GIG SMKT8e-345. This is a wireless encrypted smoke and heat detector that also offers freeze detection. This versatile and effective life-safety combo sensor is designed exclusively for use with the 2GIG GC2e and 2GIG GC3e Security Systems.


Encrypted communication is important for wireless sensors like the 2GIG SMKT8e-345. It prevents anyone from hacking or spoofing the sensor. This way, you can always be sure that it will communicate with the system properly. Many of the newer security systems on the market have their own lineup of encrypted sensors. The 2GIG GC2e and GC3e have the 2GIG eSeries Lineup, and the 2GIG SMKT8e-345 represents the latest addition.

The 2GIG SMKT8e-345 has a photoelectric sensor for smoke detection. This involves using a small light source inside the sensor, coupled with a photo sensor. When smoke enters the chamber, the light will refract onto the photo sensor. The sensor will detect this and alert the system to the fire. This detection method is extremely reliable, and it helps ensure that the system properly responds to any fire. Additionally, the optical chamber for the SMKT8e-345 is designed in such a way that the sensor is more sensitive to synthetic smoke rather than natural cooking smoke. This helps to prevent certain false alarms on the system.

The SMKT8e-345 also uses a fixed temperature and rate-of-rise sensor for extreme heat detection. The heat sensor is triggered in a rather unique way that we've never quite seen with another heat detector. Whenever the sensor detects a temperature increase of 15°F or more in a single minute, it sends a rate-of-rise alert to the panel. But the system will only go into alarm and the sensor will only activate its sounder if the rate-of-rise alert is sent when the sensor detects a fixed temperature of 104°F or higher. The sensor will monitor and report any extreme temperature variations.

We do not have the specifications for the built-in freeze detector at this time. We can assume that the sensor most likely activates at temperatures around 40°F to 45°F and below. This will give you time to take action before the pipes freeze due to a broken HVAC system. Note that the internal sounder for the 2GIG SMKT8e-345 is rated at 90dB. This is good for alerting everyone in an average sized home or a small business. If your system is monitored, the activated sensor will trigger an alarm so that an alert is sent to you and/or a central station. The sensor uses three (3) AAA batteries, and it has an average battery life of 10 years with normal use.

If you have any questions about the 2GIG SMKT8e-345 or any of the products sold on our site, please reach out to us by emailing support@alarmgrid.com. Keep in mind that our support hours run from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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