Product Graveyard Posts

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Resideo announced last week that due to a required component becoming obsolete, they are forced to discontinue the popular 5800FLOOD sensor. There is still some available stock, so Alarm Grid has not yet discontinued it, but once all stock has been exhausted, the 5800FLOOD is gone for good.

The 5800FLOOD is popular because unlike the 5821, it doesn't require that a water probe be added to the sensor. Water detection is built-in, and configuration is easy. Another benefit of the 5800FLOOD is that it will alert for flooding more quickly than the 5821. The prongs of the 5800FLOOD need only be in contact with water for about 25 seconds before a signal is sent to the alarm panel. The 5821 flood probe must be in contact with water for about three (3) minutes before sending a signal.

In addition to flood sensing, the 5800FLOOD also monitors for extreme cold and/or hot temperatures locally. This is done using a temperature sensor that is built into the 5800FLOOD. For cold temperature sensing, if the ambient temperature drops below 45℉ (7.2℃) for more than 15 minutes, an alert is sent using Loop 1. For high-temperature sensing, if the temperature rises above 95℉ (35℃) for more than 15 minutes, then an alert is sent using Loop 2. The flood sensor transmits using Loop 3.

Now that the 5800FLOOD is being discontinued, the Resideo and Honeywell Home 5821 is the recommended replacement. One drawback to the 5821 is that it requires a remote probe be added for flood sensing, and for freeze sensing. However, only one (1) remote probe can be used per transmitter, so if you need to monitor for both flood and freeze, two (2) 5821s are required.

The 5821 supports the following functions:

Loop Number Sensing Capability Description
Loop 1 Ambient Low Temperature Sensing <45℉ (7.2℃) >10 Minutes sends alert
Loop 2 - Local Ambient Warm/Hot Temperature Sensing >75℉ (23.8℃) >10 Minutes sends alert; >95℉ (35℃) >10 minutes sends alert. Disabled when any remote probe is used!
Loop 2 - Remote Using T280R or TS300R Remote Probe Freeze Sensing >10℉ (-12.2℃) for 30 minutes; Refrigerator Sensing >42℉ (5.5℃) for 30 minutes. Can't be used if the Flood Probe is used.
Loop 3 - Remote Uses FP280 or 470PB Remote Probe Flood Sensing - Signals when the probe's terminals have been in contact with at least 1/4" of water for > 3 Minutes. Can't be used if the Temp Probe is used.

For flood sensing, we recommend using the FP280 as it includes wiring, and the required resistor is already in place. With the 470PB, the user is responsible for providing their own wire and must add the 2.2 MΩ resistor themselves. In all cases, wiring between the 5821 and whichever remote probe is used should be made as short as possible, and should not exceed 96" (243cm). Be sure to read the full Install Guide for the 5821 for all of its various quirks.

Supply chain shortages claim another victim in the 5800FLOOD. It seems like only yesterday that we were excitedly telling you about it. What are your thoughts on the demise of this "New and Improved" environmental sensor? Leave us a note in the comments, as we always love hearing from our readers.

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Effective in August of 2022, Alarm.com is ending sales of Alarm.Com Image Sensors (ADC-IS-220-GC and ADC-IS-300-LP). Alarm Grid has already discontinued these sensors due to the fact that they are in short supply, and no more of them will be produced. Only the Honeywell Home PROINDMV remains.

The 2GIG IMAGE3:


There was some overlap between the Alarm.com Image Sensor models, and the 2GIG and Qolsys Image Sensor models. I have confirmed with Alarm.com that the 2GIG and Qolsys models are also discontinued as of August, 2022. Currently, the only Image Sensors being offered by Alarm Grid are the DSC PowerG and Honeywell Home PROINDMV models which are discussed in more detail below.

Image sensors were a great idea that never really took off. The original image sensors, first offered by 2GIG and Alarm.com, did not have particularly good resolution or picture quality, which is probably one reason they weren't widely adopted by the DIY crowd. By the time the 2nd generation of these sensors came around, people were prepared to simply go with full-on video monitoring or to avoid capturing images altogether.

Both the second and third-generation image sensors that were offered by 2GIG, Qolsys, and Alarm.com had very good image quality. Combine that with Alarm Grid's policy of offering monitoring for image sensors without an additional price markup, and the image sensor was a viable alternative to the use of video cameras. An Alarm.com user could log into their account and perform a "peek-in", meaning they could request that a particular image sensor grab a picture of whatever it was able to see at that moment, and the image (actually two (2) images) would then be uploaded to the customer's alarm.com account for viewing. The sensor could also take images upon sensing motion after a particular period of inactivity, or upon an alarm. For full details on image sensor features and operation, check out this prior post.

DSC offers a couple of PowerG PIR Cameras that will work with the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 and IQ Panel 4 in addition to the DSC PowerSeries Neo panels with a PowerG Transceiver added. These are the DSC PG9934P, Indoor PIR Camera, and the DSC PG9944, Outdoor PIR Camera. These sensors work like any other PowerG Sensor with the Qolsys Panels. They can only capture images when the system is armed and the image sensor is active (not bypassed). They send their images to the panel, and then the first image is uploaded to Alarm.com. A total of ten (10) images are taken, and these images are stitched together by the panel into a sort of stop-motion video where each image can also be viewed individually. This is done via the panel screen itself. When used with the PowerSeries Neo panels, the DSC PIR Cameras can be used for Visual Verification only, they do NOT work like a regular image sensor with Alarm.com.

DSC PG9934P, Indoor Image Sensor:

DSC PG9944, Outdoor Image Sensor:


The Honeywell Home PROINDMV is a wireless PIR motion sensor with a camera built-in, just like the 2GIG, Qolsys, and Alarm.com image sensors were. The PROINDMV is currently only supported on the Resideo PROA7PLUSC, and Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS panels. There is no "peek-in" option for these image sensors. They can only capture images when they sense motion while the system is armed in Away mode. Images or videos are captured and uploaded to Total Connect 2.0 for viewing. The user can choose to receive either a still image or a 10-second video clip. You can read their full details of operation in our previous post.

Honeywell Home PROINDMV:


It seems like the era of the image sensor may be coming to a close, at least for now. Who knows, once we're through the global chip shortage, and the availability of components is back to normal, perhaps the humble image sensor will experience a revival. If so, DIYers may want to consider giving these sensors a try. They really are an excellent idea. They can be used for alarm verification in this age of increasing police resistance to alarm response, and they are cheaper, both initially and on an ongoing month-to-month basis, than video cameras.


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Resideo sent out a notice on March 16 that the Lynx 3000 and the LynxTouch 7000, (aka the L3000 and the L7000) are discontinued. The Lynx Touch 5210 (L5210) is still being manufactured. This marks the end of an era for this product line as there is now no push-button panel option available.

Alarm Grid has already discontinued the L3000 panel because there are none in stock. There are some L7000 panels in inventory, so you can still purchase one of those panels, for now. However, as soon as stock is exhausted the L7000 will also be history. Speaking of history, the Lynx panel has had quite a run. The original Lynx panel was released in the 1990s and didn't even have a rechargeable battery.

The next iteration, the Lynx-R (R for Rechargeable), came along very soon after the Lynx (for obvious reasons). Then the LynxR-24, the LynxR-EN. There were so many different versions over the next 20 years. It used to be quite a job just figuring out which Lynx panel someone had when they needed support! It wasn't always a requirement that you know the version in order to solve the issue, but at times, the version information was crucial.

In the early 2010s the LynxTouch panels came along with the introduction of the LynxTouch L5000. That panel was missing some key features. It couldn't support any type of internet communication. It didn't have a back door into programming, so if you lost the Installer Code, well, that was too bad. So, pretty soon the L5100 was released with desirable features included that were missing in the L5000. We have an entire video devoted to discussing the versions of the LynxTouch panels, their differences, and how you can tell them apart.

Now, we're saying goodbye to the Lynx 3000, and the LynxTouch L7000. Since the first Lynx panel was introduced nearly 30 years ago, this is the first time there is no push-button version of a Lynx available. These panels have been very popular in apartments and dormitories, and I'm sure they will be missed. They are being replaced by the Honeywell Home PROA7, the Resideo PROA7C, the Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS, or the Resideo PROA7PLUSC.

The Lynx lineup is not completely gone, though. The Resideo LynxTouch 5210 (L5210) is still being manufactured. This panel occupies the middle ground between the L3000 and the L7000. It has a touchscreen, though it is rather small at 4.3 inches. It offers nearly all the same features as the L7000, albeit fewer of them. This means fewer zones, and fewer users in addition to the smaller screen, but also a smaller price tag. Check out this comparison between the L7000 and the L5210. This comparison includes the Lyric in addition to the L5210 and the L7000.

What do you think about this discontinuation? Given the fact that they have continued to update communicators for the L3000 to include the LTE products, I thought the L3000 was going to be around forever. Are you surprised at this news? Drop us a line in the comments below and let us know what you think. We enjoy a spirited conversation!

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Qolsys TSB #211022 indicates that the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus, PowerG and 319.5 MHz version with any communicator has been discontinued. All kits containing these versions have also been discontinued. The IQ Panel 4 PowerG and 319.5 MHz panel is the appropriate replacement in this instance.

Currently Alarm Grid offers the Qolsys IQ Panel 4 Verizon LTE, Interlogix/GE Compatible 319.5 MHz Wireless Alarm Panel w/ PowerG, and the Qolsys IQ Panel 4 AT&T LTE, Interlogix/GE Compatible 319.5 MHz Wireless Alarm Panel w/ PowerG. Both versions will eventually be offered in Black or White color variations, but at this time only the White variation is available.

This announcement is only for the Interlogix/GE compatible panels that support legacy RF in the 319.5 MHz frequency. The other variations of the IQ Panel 2 Plus, those that support 345 MHz Honeywell and 2GIG legacy RF, and 433 MHz DSC legacy RF sensors are still available at this time. This is because production for the IQ Panel 4 versions of these panels has not yet begun.

Per Qolsys, the IQ Panel 4 PowerG and Honeywell/2GIG compatible panels that support 345 MHz legacy RF sensors are beginning production this week. As supply ramps up, the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus that supports this legacy RF frequency will be phased out. We expect this to begin happening in the near future. Production of the IQ Panel 4 for the DSC compatible panels that support 433 MHz legacy RF sensors will begin production in early December, with a similar phase out of those IQ Panel 2 Plus models soon to follow.

As with the IQ Panel 2 Plus, each Qolsys IQ Panel 4 will support PowerG in addition to one (1) legacy RF frequency. In addition to choosing a panel based on the RF frequency to be used, the user will also want to choose the panel with the built-in cellular communicator that will have the best signal strength and quality in the location where the panel will be installed. This can match the carrier for the user's cell phone, but that is not a requirement. When deciding which cellular carrier to choose, base the decision solely on cellular coverage. Billing for the panel's cellular communicator will be included in the monthly monitoring service charges.

The legacy RF frequency built-in to the IQ Panel 4 is intended to make it easy to replace an existing alarm panel from a different manufacturer. By choosing the IQ Panel 4 that supports the wireless frequency for sensors that are already installed in a location, a user can save a lot of money by not having to buy all new sensors. You get the benefit of an all new, feature-rich alarm panel without the expense, not to mention the time and trouble saved, of replacing existing sensors that still work.

Were you thinking of purchasing a Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus in the 319.5 MHz "flavor"? If you were, you can purchase the IQ Panel 4 instead. This panel currently has the exact same User Interface (UI) as the IQ Panel 2 Plus, so the user experience will not differ. We expect the IQ Panel 4 to get a facelift in the near future, with the end-user having the choice of whether they want to use the new interface, or stick with the legacy one. The new UI is supposed to be very similar to the Alarm.com layout. If you have any comments, please leave them below. As always, we look forward to hearing from you!

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Alarm.com announced on Friday, October 22, 2021 that they plan to discontinue sales of the Concord 4 Dual-Path VoLTE Module and Gateway at the end of October. Interlogix, which is now owned by UTC (United Technologies Corporation) stopped making the Concord 4 panel in late 2019.

There were two (2) VoLTE Dual-Path communicators formerly offered by Alarm.com. The Alarm.com CD-411-US-AT AT&T LTE version, and the Alarm.com CD-421-US-VZ Verizon LTE version. Both of these modules have been on backorder for some time during the global chip shortage, which may have played a part in the decision to discontinue them.

As of now, there is still a Verizon LTE cellular-only communicator available for the Concord 4 panel. The Interlogix GE 600-1053-LTE-VZ connects to the Verizon LTE network for fast and reliable delivery of alarm signals and Alarm.com notifications. With Alarm.com service, the user also has the ability to review status and send alarm system commands remotely using the Alarm.com app or website.

UPDATE 10/26/21! We've discovered that the Interlogix GE 600-1053-LTE-VZ is not available from any of our vendors. We haven't seen an official discontinuation notice, but it seems it may have been. This means that currently, we can't offer any new LTE communicators for the Interlogix/GE Concord 4. For alarm reporting only, the Resideo LTEM-PA or LTEM-PV with the Resideo PRODCM Dialer Capture Module can be used.

The Concord 4 panel is not one that Alarm Grid sells. However, for those users with a Concord 4 in the field that is still working just fine, an updated communicator allows them to continue using a system they're comfortable with, while taking advantage of newly introduced features.

With a subscription to Alarm.com and one of the Verizon LTE communicators, not only can the user view the status of their system, arm and disarm remotely, and receive text, email, or push notifications on alarm events, but they can also add the convenience of Z-Wave functionality to the system. Z-Wave is a communications protocol that allows various devices in your home or business to communicate with the main system to do things such as turn on lights, set the thermostat to a particular temperature based on a Geo-Fence or on the armed status of the panel, and many more options. The Concord 4 panel just needs to be on version 4.0 or higher to support the use of the 600-1053-LTE-VZ communicator.

What do you think about Alarm.com discontinuing these modules? It's only been about a year since they were introduced. Do you think the global chip shortage led to the demise of the Concord 4 Dual-Path communicators? Leave a comment below and we can discuss further. As always, we look forward to hearing from you.

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We've actually heard this before. In December of 2020, we reported that Alarm.com would begin phasing out support for Edge Legacy in February of 2021, with support for that browser ending in April. However, apparently, those plans were thwarted and the new deadline is now on the horizon.

So, what is Edge Legacy, anyway? Well, when Windows 10 first launched back in 2015, Edge Legacy, then called Microsoft Edge was a part of that browser package in the same way that Internet Explorer had always been a part of the prior Windows releases. The original Edge was a HTML-based browser that Microsoft hoped would change the game for them, however, it was universally panned. I think I speak for everyone when I say, "Hated it!"

In January, 2020, Microsoft re-launched Microsoft Edge. This new version is built on Chromium, which is an open-source browser platform that was originally launched by Google, and serves as the backbone of Google Chrome as well as Opera, and Vivaldi. Since it's open-source, anyone can take it and make what they want with it.

Now that Microsoft has "embraced" Chromium, all modern browsers use open-source base platforms. Also, the use of Chromium means that the new Edge works with Chrome extensions. One of the big changes with Microsoft Edge is that it gets updated regularly and automatically, as opposed to updates being rolled out bundled with Windows updates. Microsoft stopped supporting Edge Legacy as of March 9, 2021.

So, back to Alarm.com and their announcement. Beginning Monday November 1, 2021, if a user logs into Alarm.com using either the Edge Legacy or the Internet Explorer 11 (IE11) browser, they will receive a pop-up message suggesting that they switch to a more up-to-date browser. They will continue to be able to log in using the current browser for the next two (2) months. After two (2) months, January 1, 2022, Edge Legacy and IE11 will no longer be supported for use with Alarm.com.

It is suggested that users choose Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, Apple Safari, or Microsoft Edge (the newest version) when accessing Alarm.com. Any of these compatible browsers on the most current version should provide a good, quality user experience when using Alarm.com. If you're not sure whether you have the Edge Legacy browser, or the Microsoft Edge browser, you can see the difference in the logos below.


So, what do you think about this announcement? Will it affect you or anyone you know? Some users, those that are resistant to change, may run into some issues with this. If you happen to be the technical support friend or relative everyone calls when they have a problem, you may hear about it. Let us know what you think in the comments below. We enjoy a robust dialogue with our customers!

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Frequent readers of our blog may remember from back in late March of this year that the Honeywell IPCAM-WOC1, also called the Lyric OC1, was discontinued without replacement. However, we may soon be reversing that statement, as we have heard that the outdoor camera may soon return!

If you are not familiar with the Honeywell IPCAM-WOC1, it is an outdoor security camera that is used with the Total Connect 2.0 interactive security notification and automation platform. It was quite shocking to us when the camera was discontinued, as it left no outdoor camera available for use with the TC2 platform. Nevertheless, we reported the news, and we even mentioned that it left the door open for a new camera to be revealed at ISC West 2021.

However, Resideo experts have stated that the Honeywell IPCAM-WOC1 was never really discontinued completely, and it was actually just being made temporarily unavailable due to supply issues. Once Resideo resolves the supply issues, the Honeywell IPCAM-WOC1 will supposedly be making a triumphant return. According to insider sources, such a return would not happen until September. It's still a couple months away, but a return might be a reality!

Please understand though, this is just a rumor at this time, albeit one with some very credible sources. We have also heard from our inside sources that it's possible that the Honeywell IPCAM-WOC1 may return as an updated model, with perhaps even a different part number. This would make sense, as the IPCAM-WOC1 was known for being a somewhat quirky device. An update to improve its performance upon return would certainly be appreciated.

We don't have much else to say about a possible return of the Honeywell IPCAM-WOC1. But we absolutely want a marketable and reliable outdoor camera for use with Total Connect 2.0. On that ground, we will be totally thrilled with a resurrection of the IPCAM-WOC1 Camera, especially if it comes as an updated model with more reliable performance. Resideo needs every resource they can get to complete with the Alarm.com Cameras, so this would be a good start.

Of course, we will keep you updated as we learn more about the Honeywell IPCAM-WOC1, so make sure to keep checking our blog for more information. And don't forget to leave a comment down below with your thoughts. We would love to know what you think of the Honeywell IPCAM-WOC1 Outdoor Camera and whether or not you would be interested in buying one if it makes its return. As always, we will return soon with more security news and updates, so make sure to stay posted!

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Update 12/30/21: The 2GIG GC3e has been discontinued and is no longer available. The 2GIG Edge w/ AT&T LTE or the 2GIG Edge w/ Verizon LTE have replaced it.

In an effort to clear out existing stock, the 2GIG GC3e Alarm Panel is now available at the bargain price of $189.99. This is an excellent chance to get a modern and reliable alarm panel for your home or business at a super low price. Act quickly, because supplies will run out very soon!

We announced earlier this month that the 2GIG GC3e was discontinued. However, due to existing stock, the GC3e Panel is effectively back from the dead for one final run. Once the limited stock runs out, the 2GIG GC3e will be discontinued forever. Room needs to be made for newer panels, so we're offering the 2GIG GC3e for the low price of $189.99. This is a rare opportunity to get a great alarm panel to build around. It can certainly fulfill all of your security and smart home automation needs once you get it set up and running!

The GC3e is fantastic for alarm monitoring. Just add either a 2GIG LTEA-A-GC3 AT&T LTE Communicator or a 2GIG LTEV1-A-GC3 Verizon LTE Communicator, and you will be able to connect the GC3e with the Alarm.com Servers for monitoring service. Since the 2GIG GC3e already has an internal WIFI card, adding the cellular communicator will make it into a dual-path system that will stay monitored even if one path goes down or becomes unavailable. Alarm.com requires cellular connectivity, so you will need a monitoring plan that includes cellular communication, such as an Alarm Grid Gold Plan (Self or Full).

Although the 2GIG GC3e doesn't support more advanced features like Bluetooth Disarming and Facial Recognition Disarming, the GC3e does support the robust lineup of 2GIG eSeries Encrypted Sensors. You can also supplement those encrypted sensors with non-encrypted sensors from the 2GIG 345 MHz Series and the Honeywell 5800 Series for good measure. The panel also has an integrated Z-Wave Plus controller so that you can start building a smart home network to make your life more convenient.

Overall, the 2GIG GC3e is an outstanding choice if you want more of a simple, no-frills panel that is still unmistakably modern and offers all the remote access and function through Alarm.com. If you do want something more advanced, than the 2GIG GC3e's effective replacement, the 2GIG Edge is available in AT&T LTE and Verizon LTE variants. Both the GC3e and the Edge connect with the same Alarm.com platform, and both offer the same sensor compatibility. The main benefit to going with the Edge is that you get access to some more advanced features, such as the aforementioned Bluetooth Disarming and Facial Recognition Disarming. If you don't mind missing out on those features, then the 2GIG GC3e is basically just as good. Both systems feature very similar menus and user interfaces (UIs), so if you know one, then you pretty much already know the other!

In addition, we are also offering special pricing on 2GIG GC3e System Kits. Each kit includes a cellular communicator for getting the system monitored a Honeywell LT-Cable for providing power, one (1) 2GIG PIR1e-345 Motion Sensor, and either three (3) or ten (10) VERSA-2GIG Door and Window Contact Sensors. Just decide whether you want AT&T LTE or Verizon LTE, and also whether you want three (3) door and window sensors or ten (10) door and window sensors. Then find the corresponding kit below. Hurry, before time runs out!

Remember, once supplies of the 2GIG GC3e run out, then the system is gone forever. If you have any questions about the GC3e, or any of the other security systems on our website, or if you want to speak with a security system expert who can help you build the perfect setup for your home or business, then please do not hesitate to send an email to our dedicated team at support@alarmgrid.com. We're here to check your emails from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. Whether you go with the 2GIG GC3e, its replacement, the 2GIG Edge, or a different system entirely, we will be there to help you every step of the way. Thank you for reading the Alarm Grid Blog, and we will be back with more news and promotions real soon!

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A new alarm panel hitting the market often means an old one is discontinued. That is the case here today, as the 2GIG GC3e has been formally discontinued by Nortek Control. The GC3e has been replaced by the 2GIG Edge, which is available in both an AT&T variant and a Verizon variant.

As we look back on the 2GIG GC3e, we gotta admit that the panel was in an unfavorable position from the start. The system was a direct replacement to the 2GIG GC3, as it retained largely the same user interface, and its design only received a minor refresh. The big new addition with the GC3e was its ability to support 2GIG eSeries Encrypted Sensors. Along with the 2GIG GC2e, this marked the first time that 2GIG Alarm Panels could support encrypted sensors.

Unfortunately, 2GIG was late to the party, as other security systems like the Honeywell Lyric and Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus already had encrypted sensor support, not to mention a wide selection of sensors to choose from. Coupled with the fact that Qolsys continued to release new features for the IQ2+, and Resideo (formerly Honeywell) had the PROA7PLUS on the way, it quickly became clear that 2GIG would need to do better in order to keep up.

Thus began development on the 2GIG Edge. We first learned about the system in October of last year. With a bold new website and heavy promotion, hype around the Edge grew quickly. But this also brought questions in the back of our minds - what would happen to the GC2e and the GC3e? These panels had been on the market for less than two (2) years. Would 2GIG really abandon them so quickly? Well, today we have the verdict. The 2GIG GC2e stays, and the 2GIG GC3e heads off to the old alarm system graveyard in the sky.

First released in late July 2019, the 2GIG GC3e became known for its strong build quality and stark similarities to its GC3 predecessor. But it had a hard time competing with fellow Alarm.com Security System, the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus. Buyers continued to flock to the IQ2+, which offered Automatic Bluetooth Disarming and Facial Recognition. Those features could not be easily added to the GC3e, so 2GIG decided to cut their losses and add those features into a new alarm panel, the 2GIG Edge. 2GIG even one-upped Qolsys by making it so that the Edge's Facial Recognition feature can be used for disarming the system!

With the Edge firmly in place as 2GIG's new flagship panel, and the 2GIG GC2e set as their "budget-friendly" option, some wondered if the 2GIG GC3e might be kept in production as a sort of "middle-of-the-road" offering. But nope, apparently, three panels is too many at 2GIG, and it's the GC3e biting the dust. And now, less than two years after hitting the market, and barely more than two years removed from its unveiling at ISC West 2019, we are saying goodbye to the 2GIG GC3e. It wasn't a long ride, but it was a good one.

If you have an existing 2GIG GC3e, then don't worry! The system will continue to be supported for alarm monitoring and service with the Alarm.com platform. Given the system's great build quality, it's fair to expect that existing GC3e Panels already out in the field will likely stay in service for quite some time, probably for the duration of LTE cellular networks. And speaking of LTE communication, Alarm Grid is continuing to offer LTE communicators for the 2GIG GC3 and 2GIG GC3e. These are the 2GIG LTEA-A-GC3 (AT&T LTE) and the 2GIG LTEV1-A-GC3 (Verizon LTE). If you need to get your GC3 updated, or your GC3e monitored, then either one of these modules is an excellent option. They're super easy to install, and they provide ultra-reliable cellular connectivity for the peace of mind that you deserve.

Meanwhile, the 2GIG GC2e will remain in production as the company's budget panel. However, we don't usually recommend that system for alarm monitoring, as it has no internet connectivity option to serve as an additional communication path, and it is relatively bare-bones in terms of features. But it is still an available option, and many users find that the GC2e is a strong offering as a replacement for the 2GIG GC2 or as a non-monitored system serving as a local noisemaker.

But for our top 2GIG pick, it should come as no surprise that we are recommending the new 2GIG Edge Alarm System. With its great features like 7-inch touchscreen controller, Facial Recognition, optional Automatic Bluetooth Disarming, Smart Area Partitioning support, 700-Series Z-Wave Plus V2 Smart Home Automation, and being dual-path ready right out of the box, we are proud to say that this system is available now on the Alarm Grid website. While we might miss the 2GIG GC3e, the 2GIG Edge certainly fills the void. Time will tell how the Edge fares against other competing systems like the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus and Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS.

What do you think of the 2GIG GC3e? Will you miss the system? Are you surprised to see 2GIG discontinue the system after less than two years? Did you ever get to try the system out for yourself? Share your thoughts and experiences in a comment down below. We would love to hear what you have to say. And remember to stay tuned to the Alarm Grid Blog for more security system content coming soon. We promise, we don't discontinue systems every day, but when we do, we always make sure to say a proper goodbye. Farewell 2GIG GC3e!

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Alarm.com has sent the ADC-POE-INJ PoE Injector to the big storage closet in the sky. That's our way of saying that the product has been discontinued. Alarm.com has not named an official replacement for the product. But you should be able to use most PoE Injector devices with ADC Cameras.

Before we get into the significance of the ADC-POE-INJ being discontinued, we should give a quick lesson on what exactly Power over Ethernet (PoE) refers to. Basically, PoE allows a device, in this case a compatible Alarm.com Camera, to receive both power and network connectivity from a single hardwired ethernet connection. That way, you won't need to run both a network wire and a power wire to the device. When it comes to the Alarm.com Cameras, most of their cameras designed for commercial use (with a VC in the SKU or name) support PoE, while most of their residential cameras do not support PoE.

Normally, if you are using an internet network router that supports PoE, then no PoE injector is needed. You will just connect the ethernet wire from the PoE-supported router to the PoE-compatible device. By doing this, both power and network connectivity will be supplied. But if you are using a router or network switch that doesn't already provide power, then you can add a PoE injector to add (inject) electrical power into the ethernet connection. That's where a device like the ADC-POE-INJ really comes in handy. The Alarm.com ADC-POE-INJ has served as the recommended PoE injector for use with PoE-compatible Alarm.com Cameras for quite some time. Now with the product discontinued, users must find another option.

Alarm.com has not yet named a replacement for the discontinued ADC-POE-INJ, nor do they have another option that they officially recommend. But the good news is that most PoE injectors on the market should work fine. If you need a PoE injector for setting up a network of PoE-compatible cameras, then you should be able find one online or at most computer or office supply stores. And we will make sure to let you know if we learn of a good replacement from Alarm.com or another reputable source.

Of course, if you come across a used ADC-POE-INJ, then it should still work just fine. But you are unlikely to find any new models with the product officially discontinued. If you had any prior experience using the ADC-POE-INJ, then please let us know about your personal thoughts on the product down below. Did you find that it was an easy PoE injector to use, or did it present some difficulties? We would love to hear what you have to say. Stay tuned to the Alarm Grid Blog for more security news and updates coming real soon!

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