Glass Break Detectors Posts

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Hi DIYers! As you know, you can't have a security system without some sensors! Of course, with all the possible sensor types it can be overwhelming to decide which ones you really need for your system. While nearly every sensor type serves a purpose, these are the 5 we deem most crucial.

Alarm grid inside security stickers

5. Glass Break Sensors

Glass break sensors are used to detect broken windows and other glass break events. These devices have built-in microphones, and they actively listen for the sound of breaking glass. Most glass break sensors utilize a dual-sound detection method. This means that the sensor must detect both the low-pitched thud of an object striking against the glass and the high-pitched shattering of the glass itself. This helps prevent false alarms. Glass break sensors are perfect for monitoring for forced entry into your home. You can even use a single glass break sensor to monitor multiple windows in the same room!

2gig gb1 wireless glass break detector

4. Environmental Sensors

Environmental sensors include devices like temperature sensors and flood sensors. These sensors monitor for unusual environmental conditions that likely indicate a problem. For example, a flood sensor will let your system know if there is a water leak that could lead to expensive water damage. Meanwhile, a temperature sensor will monitor for unusually high or low temperatures that indicate a broken HVAC system. There are also many environmental sensors that can perform dual functions and operate as both temperature and flood sensors.

Honeywell 5821 wireless temperature sensor and water sensor exte


3. Life-Safety Sensors

Life-safety sensors are used to monitor for life-threatening environmental conditions, such as a fire or an outbreak of carbon monoxide gas. These include devices like smoke and heat detectors and carbon monoxide sensors. There are also special combination CO and smoke detectors that can monitor for multiple types of life-safety conditions. Enrolling properly functioning life-safety sensors with your system can mean the difference between life and death. And for fires, you will be able to ensure a faster response if one occurs while you are away. These are a must-have for any system.

Honeywell 5800combo smoke heat and co detector

2. Motion Detection Sensors

Motion sensors are some of the most useful sensors you can add to your system. These devices alert the system upon detecting a change in infrared (IR) energy caused by movement. There are also some motion sensors that use microwave radar technology in addition to passive infrared (PIR). You can install motions inside your home as interior sensors to determine if anyone gains entry while you are away. They are perfect for detecting general activity and movement in areas where none should be present. There are even pet-immune motion sensors so that you won't need to worry about your pets setting them off. Just make sure you choose the installation area carefully.

Qolsys qs1231 840 iq motion s encrypted motion sensor

1. Door & Window Contacts

Door and window contacts are the easiest to use and most effective sensors for any alarm system. They are used for letting your system know if someone opens up a door or window. These sensors usually consist of two parts, which are a sensor and a magnet. The sensor goes on the door or window frame, and the magnet goes on the moving part of the door or window. Opening the door or window will cause the magnet to become separated from the sensor. The sensor will detect this and alert the system. There are also recessed door and window sensors that allow for a more aesthetically- pleasing installation!

Honeywell sixct wireless door slash window contact for lyric con

Remember, our goal at Alarm Grid is to set you up with the perfect security system for your needs. We also offer top-quality alarm monitoring services that are great for pairing with a new or existing alarm system. If you ever need help designing or using your security system, or if you want to learn more about our monitoring services, please reach out to us! We are best reached by email at support@alarmgrid.com. Or you may call us at (888) 818-7728 during our regular business hours of 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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Hi DIYers! Today, we're giving a quick lesson on Response Types, also known as Sensor Groups. Every sensor used with your security system will have one. It is important that you get these settings correct so that your alarm system responds appropriately when a sensor is activated!

Honeywell sixct wireless door slash window contact for lyric con


Starting with the basics, the Response Type is the setting that tells the system how to respond when the sensor is activated or faulted. Most Honeywell and 2GIG Systems refer to this as a Response Type. Other systems like the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus refer to this setting as the Sensor Group. For the purpose of this post, we will generally use the terms interchangeably. Just know that when we are talking about Response Types, we also mean Sensor Groups.

When it comes to sensors for alarm systems, there are many types. Some common examples include door and window contacts, motion sensors, glass break sensors, shock sensors, smoke detectors, carbon monoxide sensors, panic buttons, medical alert buttons, temperature sensors, and flood sensors, just to name a few. As a result, there are many Response Types as well. What you use for one sensor type is likely very different from what you would use for another, though there is some overlap from time to time.

Now, we're not going to cover each and every Response Type and Sensor Group here today. But what we will do is cover some general rules for Response Types so that you know a little bit more about them. If you do want some more extensive knowledge on Response Types or Sensor Groups, check the programming manual for your panel. We also have the following FAQs that you may want to check out:

With that out of the way, let's take a look at some of the most basic and general Response Types you will encounter.

Entry/Exit: An Entry/Exit Zone is used for coming and going. This is almost always going to be a door that you use to enter and/or exit your home or business. When this zone is faulted while the system is Armed Away or Armed Stay, you will need to Disarm your system within a preset Entry Delay period, or else an alarm will occur. Additionally, if your system has Auto-Stay Arming enabled, then you will need to fault an Entry/Exit Zone during the Exit Delay countdown when Arming Away, or else the system will revert to Armed Stay instead.

  • Common Sensor Types: Door and Window Sensors for Entering/Exiting the Building

Interior: An Interior Zone refers to a sensor that can trigger an alarm while the system is Armed Away, but not while the system is Armed Stay. The idea here is that when your system is Armed Away, there should be nobody inside the building, and faulting an Interior Zone would mean there is a security breach. But when the system is Armed Stay, there is still someone inside the building, and you want them to be able to move around freely. A very common sub-type of an Interior Zone is an Interior Follower Zone. The "follower" portion of the name refers to the fact that the zone will not cause an alarm if the sensor is after (e.g. it follows) an Entry/Exit Zone. The reasoning is that you may need to fault an Interior Zone to get to your system and Disarm after faulting an Entry/Exit Zone.

  • Common Sensor Types: Interior Motion Sensors, Interior Door and Window Sensors

Perimeter: A Perimeter Zone is a very secure sensor. If a Perimeter Zone is faulted while the system is Armed Away or Armed Stay, then an alarm will occur immediately. You should only assign a Perimeter Zone to a sensor that should absolutely never be faulted while the system is Armed. Perimeter Zones are commonly used for Window Sensors (unless you like to climb in through the window!), as well as Glass Break Sensors and Shock Sensors that indicate forced entry into the building. Some panels also have a similar Response Type called Day/Night. This Response Type is the same as Perimeter, except that a Day/Night Zone will also trigger a Trouble condition if the sensor is faulted while the system is Disarmed.

  • Common Sensor Types: Window Sensors, Glass Break Sensors, Shock Sensors

24-Hour: A 24-Hour Zone is the most secure Zone Type available. This is a sensor that should never be activated, unless there is an emergency or something seriously wrong. There are many sub-categories of 24-Hour Zones, including 24-Hour Burglary, 24-Hour Fire, 24-Hour Carbon Monoxide, and 24-Hour Auxiliary. Since these are very secure zones, you will likely want to provide special instructions regarding these zones for the central monitoring station. This way, the operator will know how to respond when they see the alarm come through. For example, if you give your Flood Sensor a 24-Hour Auxiliary Response Type, you will want the operator to know that it isn't an emergency medical alarm! The 24-Hour Auxiliary Response Type is often used for both environmental sensors and medical sensors, so you will want to provide specification.

  • Common Sensor Types: Smoke & Heat Detectors, Carbon Monoxide Sensors, Panic Buttons, Medical Alert Buttons, Flood Sensors, Temperature Sensors

Of course, this is just a small list of the available Response Types and Sensor Groups. But you will usually find Zone Types just like these no matter which panel you use. If you want to learn more about Response Types, you are welcome to send us an email at support@alarmgrid.com. We will check your email when we have an opportunity and reply back as soon as possible. Remember that our support hours are from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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Hi DIYers! Our YouTube Channel uploaded a sound clip that mimics the sound of breaking glass. This sound clip can be used to test various glass break detectors for proper function. This includes both external glass break sensors and the internal glass break sensor for the Qolsys IQ Panel 2.


Although this might just sound like a generic glass break effect, it was actually specifically designed for testing glass break sensors. It includes both the low-pitched "thud" of an object striking against the glass, as well as the high-pitched "shattering" sound that is most commonly associated with breaking glass.

In order to test one of your glass break sensors, start by putting your system on test mode with the central station. Next, pull up the YouTube clip on your phone, and set your phone's volume to its highest setting. Then play the clip in its entirety while you are within the detection range of your glass break sensor. If successful, the sensor will send an alert to the control panel to let it know that it has been activated. You might want to test the sensor from multiple locations to make sure that it will properly respond to glass breaking from different directions.

Keep in mind that if the glass break sensor does not activate during testing, it does not necessarily mean that your glass break sensor isn't working properly. It may just need to have its settings adjusted, or you may need to change its location. Also, it's very important to mention that we recommend using a conventional glass break simulator, such as a Honeywell FG701 or an Interlogix 5709C-W if possible. This sound clip is only alternative option if a user has no other way of testing their sensor. Although the clip should work well, it will not work as effectively as a legitimate testing device.

We hope this clip will be helpful for users who need to test their glass break sensors. If you need any help, please contact us at 888-818-7728 M-F from 9am to 8pm EST or email us any time at support@alarmgrid.com.

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