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Alarm Grid is here with another video recap! This time, we have nine (9) new videos to check out. Jarrett again stepped up this week and did a couple of videos. Our team is thrilled to have him back in the Alarm Grid studio. Let's take a look at the latest tutorial videos from Alarm Grid.

Assigning User Codes to Partitions On the IQ Panel 2 Plus

I show you how to assign user codes to different partitions on the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus. When you have partitions enabled on the IQ2+, you will need to assign partitions to every programmed user code. A user code will only be able to control a partition that it has been assigned. The system's Master Code, also known as the Admin Code, has access to every partition on the system. There are up to four (4) partitions available on the IQ2+.


Getting Into Z-Wave Programming on a Honeywell Home Tuxedo

I show you how to access Z-Wave programming on a Honeywell Home Tuxedo Keypad. In addition to serving as a touchscreen keypad for a Honeywell VISTA System, the Tuxedo is also used as a Z-Wave Plus controller. In order to add, remove, and edit any of the Z-Wave devices used with the Tuxedo, you must access the Z-Wave Programming Menu. This menu is easy to access so that you can begin quickly setting up your home automation network.


Opening the Honeywell SiXCOMBO

I show you how to open up the Honeywell SiXCOMBO Combination Smoke, Heat, and CO Detector. You will normally need to open up the SiXCOMBO to change the batteries and to access the inside sticker with important device information. The SiXCOMBO uses four (4) lithium CR123A batteries, also known as camera batteries, and it has an average battery life of five (5) years. The inner sticker includes information like the device's Serial Number, manufacture date, and more.


The Resideo Tuxedo is Not an Alarm Communicator

I explain how the Resideo Tuxedo is not an AlarmNet Communicator for a security system. Although the Tuxedo connects to a local WIFI network, it does not do so for the purpose of providing IP connectivity for the panel. The Tuxedo merely connects to the internet to relay automation commands from Total Connect 2.0 and for receiving firmware updates. The user must still add a compatible communicator to their VISTA System to set up alarm monitoring.


Using More Than One SkyBell With Total Connect 2.0

Jarrett explains how Total Connect 2.0 allows you to pair up to five (5) SkyBell Video Doorbell devices per account. The account does not need to include true video monitoring service for the SkyBell devices to work. If you want to use more than 5 SkyBell Video Doorbells with Total Connect 2.0, then it is necessary to sign-up for a second account. You can link the multiple accounts so that you can access them using the same login information.


Setting up Total Connect 2.0 Notifications

I explain how to setup text and email notifications in Total Connect 2.0. Text and email notifications help ensure that you are notified regarding any activity on your Honeywell Security System. This is very important for self-monitored users who do not have central station service, as they must receive these notifications and take proper action during emergencies. To set up notifications, you must create user profiles, assign phone numbers and/or email addresses to those profiles, then build notification groups and include the user profiles, and finally assign which notifications go to each group.


Changing the Battery in a Honeywell 5834-4

Jarrett shows you how to change the battery inside of a Honeywell 5834-4 Key Fob. The Honeywell 5834-4 uses a single lithium CR2032 coin battery for power. Expected battery life is roughly three (3) to five (5) years with typical usage. A Phillips screwdriver is needed to remove the back cover for the Honeywell 5834-4 and access the battery compartment. Make sure to observe proper polarity when inserting the new battery. The positive side for the CR2032 battery should be visible, once the battery has been inserted.


Using the Resideo Tuxedo Without an Alarm Panel

I explain how you can technically use the Resideo Tuxedo without an alarm panel. This is not commonly done, as the Tuxedo is primarily a keypad for a Honeywell VISTA System. But you do have the option of providing power to the Tuxedo and using it as a standalone automation controller for Z-Wave smart home devices. Some examples of Z-Wave devices that you can pair with the Tuxedo include smart lights, door locks, programmable thermostats, and more.


Install Honeywell LTE-XA or LTE- XV On a VISTA TURBO

I show you how to install a Honeywell LTE-XA AT&T LTE Communicator or a Honeywell LTE-XV Verizon LTE Communicator on a Honeywell VISTA TURBO Series Panel, such as a Honeywell VISTA-128BPT or a Honeywell VISTA-250BPT. The added communicator will allow the panel to communicate with the AlarmNet servers across a cellular network. This will allow the system to be monitored. The user will need a monitoring plan that includes cellular communication, such as an Alarm Grid Gold or Platinum Plan.

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We have another video recap lined up for you! This time there are three (3) new videos to check out. And this happens to be a very special video recap, because our fan-favorite technician makes his much-anticipated return! Let's take a look at the new Alarm Grid videos for September 11th.

Making All Partitions Sound on the Qolsys IQ Panel 2

The man. The legend. Jarrett is back, and he's going to talk about how you make all partitions sound on the Qolsys IQ Panel 2. When you enable partitions on the IQ Panel 2, only sensors on partition 1 will trigger sounds, by default. If you want the system to produce sounds for other sensors, then you must enable the Global Intrusion Sounds and Sirens feature for the system. This will require accessing programming with the Installer Code (default 1111).


Arm Stay and Arm Instant

Jarrett is excited to explain the difference between Arm Stay Mode and Arm Instant Mode. When you Arm Instant, the system ignores Entry Delay periods. This means that if you fault an Entry/Exit Zone while the system is Armed Instant, then the system will go into immediate alarm, instead of giving you a chance to disarm during the Entry Delay countdown. In Armed Stay, you get the Entry Delay when you fault an Entry/Exit Zone. Both Arm Stay and Arm Instant will automatically bypass interior zone types.


Program SiXSMOKE to Lyric Controller

I show you how to program a Honeywell SiXSMOKE to the Honeywell Lyric Alarm System. The Honeywell SiXSMOKE is an encrypted smoke and heat detector built exclusively for use with the Lyric. The smoke detector portion is photoelectric, which means that there is a small light inside the sensor. Smoke entering the chamber will cause the light to refract, which tells the sensor to report to the system. The heat detector uses both fixed temperature detection and rate-of-rise detection. The sensor has an 85 dB sounder.

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It's the first Alarm Grid video recap of September! We have some great new videos to show you, and we're hopeful that you find them helpful in setting up your system. Subscribe to our YouTube channel if you haven't yet, and stay tuned for future videos. Let's check out the newest videos.


Using a Qolsys IQ Panel 2 with a Phone Line

I explain how you cannot use the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 with a phone line connection. Phone line connectivity was once the most common communication path used with security systems. But with the rise of internet and cellular, that is no longer the case. Most newer panels like the IQ Panel 2 don't even have a jack for using a phone line. Instead, the system has built-in WIFI and cellular. Remember that activating for monitoring service with use of Alarm.com requires the activation of the system's cellular communicator.


Removing a Z Wave Device from a Qolsys IQ Panel 2

I show you how to remove, or clear, a Z-Wave device from the network by using a Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus. Clearing a Z-Wave device is typically done before enrolling it with the network to ensure that all the network data is properly wiped out. It is also done if the user no longer intends on using the Z-Wave device anymore. It is important to note that a device can still be cleared from the network even if it isn't actively enrolled with a Z-Wave hub.


Program SiXCT to Lyric Controller

I show you how to program a Honeywell SiXCT Door and Window Contact Sensor to a Honeywell Lyric Alarm System. The Honeywell SiXCT is a wireless door and window sensor that uses 128-bit AES encryption for enhanced wireless security. The sensor has a terminal block so that you can use it as a wireless transmitter with a wired contact sensor. The wireless range for the SiXCT is roughly 300 nominal feet, and it has a green LED light to assist with enrollment.


Program SiXMINICT to Lyric Controller

I show you how to program a Honeywell SiXMINICT to a Honeywell Lyric Alarm System. The SiXMINICT is a smaller version of the SiXCT. Unlike the SiXCT, the Honeywell SiXMINICT does not have a terminal block, and the sensor cannot be used as a wireless transmitter. It also has a smaller wireless signal range of only about 200 nominal feet. However, this door and window sensor is smaller than the SiXCT, and many users prefer the more compact design of the SiXMINICT. It retains the same green LED light to assist with enrollment.


Program a Honeywell SiXGB to the Lyric Security System

I show you how to program a Honeywell SiXGB Glass Break Sensor to a Honeywell Lyric Security System. As a member of the Honeywell SiX Series Lineup, the SiXGB utilizes 128-bit AES encryption, and it can only be used with the Lyric System. The wireless glass break sensor actively listens for the sound of breaking glass. It is great for monitoring windows and protective glass casings. The sensor has a detection range of roughly 25 feet, and it needs a direct line of sight to any glass being monitored.


Adding an External Communicator to a DSC PowerSeries NEO

I show you how to install an external communicator for a DSC PowerSeries NEO Security System. The PowerSeries NEO requires an added communicator for connecting with Alarm.com. The communicator connects with the DSC PCL-422 Module, which comes included. Then, a PC-Link cable connection is made between the NEO Panel and the PCL-422. Once the communicator is properly installed, you will need to activate it for monitoring service. Remember that you will need a monitoring plan that offers cellular communication.

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Alarm Grid is here with another video recap. We're got some informative videos to help you set up and use your security system. Remember to subscribe to our YouTube channel and stay tuned for future videos and other great content. Let's check out the latest tutorial videos from Alarm Grid.


Program SiXPIR to Lyric Controller

I show you how to program a Honeywell SiXPIR with a Honeywell Lyric Alarm System. The Honeywell SiXPIR is a wireless motion detection sensor designed exclusively for use with the Lyric Security System. The sensor responds to changes in infrared energy caused by movement. The SiXPIR has a maximum coverage area of (40) by (56) feet when mounted from a recommended height of (7.5) feet. It supports pet immunity for small animals weighing up to (80) pounds.


Enroll DSC PG9303 to IQ Panel 2 Plus

I show you the process for manually enrolling the DSC PG9303 PowerG Door and Window Contact Sensor with the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus. Manual enrollment refers to the practice of manually entering in the sensor's Serial Number, rather than allowing it to automatically generate through auto-enrollment. Manual enrollment is recommended for the PG9303 if auto-enrollment fails. After manually enrolling, you must activate the sensor's tamper cover to complete the enrollment process. Activating the tamper cover confirms the encryption key that is shared between the sensor and the panel.

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Alarm Grid is back with another video recap! This time, we have six (6) new videos to share. We spent a lot of time this week focusing on the 2GIG GC3e, but we also covered some other security equipment as well. We hope you enjoy this latest batch of videos. Let's check them out!

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Properly Opening Up a 2GIG GC3e

I show you how to open up the 2GIG GC3e Security Panel. Before opening the system, you must loosen the set screw at the bottom. If the panel is wall-mounted, you can press the panel against the wall and lift upward. Otherwise, lay the panel face-down, and pop off the back plate using your finger or a screwdriver. Opening up the GC3e Panel is often done to access the system's terminal block and backup battery.


Powering On the 2GIG GC3e

I show you how to power on the 2GIG GC3e Alarm System. The system uses a 14VDC, 1.7A transformer for primary power. If primary power is lost, then a backup battery will keep the system running. When powering on the 2GIG GC3e, we recommend connecting the backup battery first, followed by the transformer. Alarm wiring is not included with the 2GIG GC3e, so you must supply your own. We recommend using a Honeywell LT-Cable for this purpose.


Deleting a Defective Z-Wave Device from the GC3 or GC3e

I show you how to delete a defective Z-Wave device from a 2GIG GC3 or 2GIG GC3e. Some reasons why a Z-Wave device might be displayed as failed include the device being powered down or out of wireless range. Deleting a defective Z-Wave device is usually a good option if the device is lost or destroyed so that a traditional exclusion process cannot be performed. Any failed Z-Wave device will have an error icon next to it in the Smart Home Devices Menu.


Setting Up a Cellular Communicator for a 2GIG GC3e

I show you how to add a cellular communicator to a 2GIG GC3e Security System. Doing this will allow you to activate the 2GIG GC3e System for monitoring service. And if the monitoring plan includes access to Alarm.com, then you will also be able to control the system remotely through that platform. The 2GIG GC3e has a side slot for you to easily install a cellular radio. Remember to power down the system completely before installing the cellular communicator.


Powering the TG-1 Express Using the On-Board Terminals

I show you how you can power the Telguard TG-1 Express using its on-board power terminals. The Telguard TG-1 Express is used to take over the phone dialer for a panel so that it can communicate across a cellular network. Normally, the TG-1 uses a single RJ31X connection for power and communication with the panel. But if the existing power wires from the RJ31X cable are cut, then you can instead make the auxiliary power connections at the TG-1 on-board terminals.


Properly Closing the Qolsys IQ Panel 2

I show you how to properly close the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Security System. To properly close the system, you want to align the top tabs first. Then you should lock the bottom two (2) tabs into place. Lastly, make sure the top four (4) tabs remain closed, and click them into place if they are not. The panel will make a strange noise every half-hour if it is not closed properly. The main reason to open the IQ2 is to replace its backup battery every few years.

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It's time for another video recap! There are eight (8) new videos this week, all featuring yours truly. We spent a lot of time working on the 2GIG GC2e again. We also covered the process for backdooring the Honeywell LYNX Touch Panels, and we touched on the IQ2+. Let's check out the videos!

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Pairing a Z-Wave Device with the 2GIG GC2e

I show you how to pair a Z-Wave device with a 2GIG GC2e Security System. The 2GIG GC2e serves as a Z-Wave Plus controller, which allows you to pair smart home automation devices with the system. Devices can be controlled locally at the panel, as well as remotely from Alarm.com if the system is monitored. There are many types of Z-Wave devices you can use with the GC2e, including lights, door locks, smart thermostats, and more!


Programming a Wireless Zone On a 2GIG GC2e

I show you how to program a wireless zone for a 2GIG GC2e Alarm System. Every sensor used with the 2GIG GC2e will take up at least one zone. The GC2e System has sixty (60) wireless zones available. You can pair sensors from the Honeywell 5800 Series, the 2GIG 345 MHz Series, and the 2GIG eSeries Lineup. We recommend auto-enrolling any new sensor to prevent entering an incorrect Serial Number. Auto-enrolling will also confirm successful communication.


Programming a Key Fob for a 2GIG GC2e

I show you how to program a key fob for a 2GIG GC2e Alarm Panel. A key fob is a small, handheld device that you can use to arm and disarm your system. You can very easily carry around a key fob in your pocket or purse, and they are great for putting on key rings. Popular key fob options for the 2GIG GC2e System include the 2GIG KEY2-345, the 2GIG KEY2e-345, and the Honeywell 5834-4.


Adding & Changing User Codes On a 2GIG GC2e

I show you how to add and change user codes on a 2GIG GC3 Security Panel. The GC2e has (64) user code slots available. You need a valid user code to successfully disarm the system. It is recommended that everyone who uses the system regularly has their own user code so that you can keep track of who uses the system. You can also apply a schedule to a code so that it only works at certain times.


Using the Backdoor to Enter Programming On a Honeywell L5200 or L5210

I show you how to use the backdoor method on a Honeywell L5200 or L5210. The backdoor method involves rebooting the panel and then performing a special sequence of commands as the system reloads. By completing this process, you can get into programming if you were previously locked out. Please note that the backdooring process will not work if the system is currently in an armed state. You will need to disarm the system before you can backdoor.


Getting Back Into Programming On an L7000 If You're Locked Out

I show you how to get into programming on a Honeywell L7000 if you're locked out by using the backdoor method. There are two (2) main reasons why you would become locked out of programming. The first is that the option "NO" was selected at the prompt asking if the installer should be allowed to re-enter programming. Always choose "YES" when exiting programming. The other possibility is that you do not know the Installer Code for the system. Do not change the Installer Code from its default of 4112 to avoid being locked out.


Secure Arming On the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus

I demonstrate the Secure Arming feature on the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus. When Secure Arming is enabled, you must enter a valid user code or the Master Code when arming the system. Normally, the system can be armed without providing a code. Additionally, you must also provide a code if you go to cancel an arming session during the Exit Delay countdown if this feature is enabled. Many parents with small children enable the feature to prevent the system from being armed accidentally.


IQ Panel 2 Exit Delay Increased After Opening Door

I explain why the Exit Delay timer on the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus will automatically increase after opening a door. This is due to a false alarm prevention feature called Auto Exit Time Extension. This feature is activated if two (2) Entry/Exit faults are detected during the Exit Delay countdown. When you fault the first E/E Zone after arming, the system assumes that you have left the building. Then when another E/E fault is detected, the system assumes that you have returned. It then gives you an added 60 seconds to exit the building. If you quickly re-entered the premises because you forgot something, this prevents you from having to disarm and then re-arm the system.

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We're here with another video recap! There are eight (8) new videos for you to check out this week. Once again, I took the role of appearing in all the videos. We hope to have some familiar faces returning soon! But for now, let's take a look at what our video team has been up to.

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Deleting a Wireless Zone from a Simon XT

I show you how to delete a wireless zone from a Simon XT Security System. The Simon XT uses 319.5 MHz wireless sensors, and it has forty (40) zone slots available. By accessing the Sensors Menu of Programming, you can delete any wireless zone that has been set up with the system. You can then enroll a new sensor in that open zone slot if needed. Keep in mind that the zone must be rebuilt from scratch if you decide to re-add the sensor back to the system.


Deleting a Wireless Zone from a Simon XTi or Simon XTi-5

I show you how to delete a wireless zone from a Simon XTi or Simon XTi-5. The Simon XTi and Simon XTi-5 are essentially the same as the Simon XT, except for the fact that these two panels have built-in touchscreen keypad. Both the Simon XTi and Simon XTi-5 have forty (40) available wireless zones, and they both use 319.5 MHz wireless sensors. If you delete a zone from the Simon XTi or Simon XTi-5, then you can reuse the zone with a new sensor.


Disabling Exit Sounds on a Qolsys IQ Panel 2 or IQ Panel 2 Plus

I show you how to disable Exit Delay sounds on the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus. The IQ2 makes Exit Delay sounds for false alarm prevention. The idea is that if you accidentally Arm Away the system, then the Exit Delay sounds will alert you to the situation so that you know to either leave the building or cancel the arming session. But if you find Exit Delay sounds to be bothersome or annoying, there are a couple of different options for muting these sounds.


Cover Tamper Causes the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 to Make Strange Noises

I explain why the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 will make an usual noise every thirty (30) minutes. The reason why this happens is because the panel is not positioned on its back mounting plate properly. It can be a bit tricky to get the panel on the back plate properly, but once you do, the sound should stop occurring. If you absolutely cannot get the panel positioned on the back plate, then you do have the option of disabling tamper cover notifications in programming.


Manually Extending the Exit Delay Time On IQ2

I show you how to manually extend the Exit Delay countdown time on the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 for a single arming session. When you Arm Away on the IQ2, the Exit Delay timer will go into effect. You must then leave the building or cancel the arming session within the exit delay time limit. If you press the green +60 button, then the Exit Delay will be extended by sixty (60) seconds. You can only do this once per arming session. Pressing the button again will do nothing.


Permanently Extending the Exit Delay Time On IQ2

I show you how to permanently extend the Exit Delay countdown time on the Qolsys IQ Panel 2. By permanently extending the Exit Delay, you will have a longer amount of time to vacate the building every time you Arm. The system will use either the Normal Exit Delay setting or the Long Exit Delay setting depending on what zones you have programmed with the system. If you have at least one zone with Sensor Group 12 - Entry/Exit Long Delay, then the system will use the Long Exit Delay setting.


Installing a Honeywell 7847i on a VISTA P-Series Alarm Panel

I show you how to install a Honeywell 7847i on a VISTA P-Series Security System. The Honeywell 7847i is an IP communicator that allows a compatible panel to connect with the Resideo AlarmNet Servers for monitoring service. If you want to use Total Connect 2.0 with your system, then you must be running Firmware Version 9.12 or higher on a VISTA-15P or VISTA-20P. You can determine the firmware by checking the PROM Chip. No version of the VISTA-10P will work with Total Connect 2.0.


Installing a Honeywell 7847i On a VISTA TURBO Panel

I show you how to install a Honeywell 7847i on a Honeywell VISTA TURBO Panel, such as a Honeywell VISTA-128BPT or a Honeywell VISTA-250BPT. The most common reason why someone will choose to use an IP-only communicator is because they want monitoring costs to be as low as possible. IP monitoring is less expensive than cellular monitoring because no cellular service fees are incurred. But keep in mind that an internet outage will take your panel offline if you rely strictly on IP communication for your system.

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It's Monday again, and it's time for another Alarm Grid video recap! We have six (6) new videos for you. Five (5) feature the DSC PowerSeries NEO, while the last one covers the Honeywell LTE-IA and LTE-IV Communicators for VISTA Systems. All videos feature yours truly. Let's check them out!

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Adding a DSC HS2TCHP Touchscreen Keypad to a DSC PowerSeries NEO

I show you how to add a DSC HS2TCHP Touchscreen Keypad to a DSC PowerSeries NEO Security System. Adding a touchscreen keypad like the DSC HS2TCHP to a system can be more inviting and easier for end users to understand than a traditional numeric keypad. The DSC HS2TCHP connects with the same on-board panel terminals as any other keypad for the system. Remember to power down your NEO Panel completely before adding a keypad or making any other hardware changes.


Adding Hardwired Zone to DSC PowerSeries NEO Security System

I show you how to add a wired sensor to a DSC PowerSeries NEO Security System. As a hardwired alarm panel, the DSC PowerSeries NEO can used wired sensors with no extra add-ons being required. All wired zones on the NEO will use end of line 5.6k ohm resistors, which are color coded green-blue-red-gold. This includes wired zones that are not actively being used with the system. New wired sensors will be connected with the panel, and the appropriate Zone Definition will be set at the corresponding zone.


Program a Wireless Zone to a DSC PowerSeries NEO

I show you how to add a wireless sensor to a DSC PowerSeries NEO Security System. The NEO cannot support wireless sensors right out of the box. Instead, a wireless transceiver must be added to the system. The NEO supports PowerG Transceivers that will allow you to use PowerG Wireless Sensors with the system. The advantage to using wireless sensors is that they are much easier to install than wired sensors. This is because you will not need to run wires for wireless sensors.


Enrolling a PowerG Sensor to a DSC PowerSeries NEO

I show you how to add a PowerG Sensor to a DSC PowerSeries NEO Security System. This will require that a PowerG Transceiver is added to the system, such as a DSC HS2LCDRF9 N Keypad or a DSC HSMHOST9 Standalone Transceiver. PowerG Sensors are widely seen as some of the best wireless sensors in the security industry. This is because these sensors offer a wireless signal range of up to 2km in an open air environment, and they utilize military grade 128-bit AES encryption for exceptional security.


Delete a Zone From a DSC PowerSeries NEO

I show you how to delete a zone from a DSC PowerSeries NEO. This process differs depending on whether the zone is wireless or hardwired. For a wireless zone, you are clearing the sensor from the system so that it is no longer recognized. For a wired zone, you are merely changing the Zone Definition for the associated wired zone to [000] for Null Zone. Deleting a zone from a DSC PowerSeries NEO will open up the zone so that it can be used with a different sensor.


Installing a Honeywell LTE-IA or LTE-IV Communicator to a VISTA-21iP System

I show you how to add a Honeywell LTE-IA or a Honeywell LTE-IV to a Honeywell VISTA-21iP Security System. The LTE-IA and the LTE-IV are dual-path communicators that use both IP connectivity (wired ethernet) and LTE cellular connectivity. When adding one of these communicators to a VISTA-21iP, you must first disable the internal IP communicator for the system. This is done by re-positioning the white jumper to the bottom two (2) prongs. Make sure to power down the panel before re-positioning the jumper and installing the communicator!

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Alarm Grid is back with another video recap, this time covering videos from July 21st thru July 24th. The highlights this week include a classic video from Jorge, as well as the start of a new video series where I teach you how to set up the DSC PowerSeries NEO. Let's check out the videos!

Connecting a Honeywell Tuxedo Touch to WIFI

Jorge shows you how to connect a Honeywell Tuxedo Touch to a local WIFI network. The Tuxedo Touch uses an internet connection for sending and receiving Z-Wave signals from Total Connect 2.0. It is important to understand that the Tuxedo Touch is not actually an AlarmNet Communicator for facilitating monitoring service. Its internet connection is merely for automation purposes and displaying the current weather forecast. Without a reliable internet connection, the current status of Z-Wave devices on TC2 cannot be updated.


Powering the DSC PowerSeries NEO Security System

I show you how to provide power to a DSC PowerSeries NEO Security System Primary power comes from a 16.5VAC, 40VA transformer. Since AC power is being used, polarity does not matter when connecting wires to the module. We recommend using 18-AWG, 2-Conductor wire for this job. But if you have existing wire lying around, then that should work fine, as long as maximum wire run limits are observed. The PowerSeries NEO also receives backup power from a connected battery.


Add Wired Keypad to DSC PowerSeries NEO Security System

I show you how to add a wired alphanumeric keypad to a DSC PowerSeries NEO Alarm System. The first keypad you add to your NEO Panel should be a wired alphanumeric model for programming purposes. In particular, we recommend using the DSC HS2LCDRF9 N for this purpose. That model includes a built-in PowerG Transceiver so that you can begin adding wireless PowerG Sensors with your system. The initial keypad allows for one-touch enrollment, while additional keypads must be added through the initial keypad.



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It's Monday again, and this is normally when we would be present you with a video recap. But since we're still working on getting our entire video team together, we figured this was a good time to catch up on some videos we missed in previous recaps, as well as present some classic videos.


How Do I Clear a Latched Alarm Using a Tuxedo Touch Keypad?

I show you how to clear a latched alarm on a Honeywell Tuxedo Touch Keypad. This is done by performing a typical disarm and then clearing the faulted zone. The reason why alarms become latched or stuck is because of the alarm memory feature on the Honeywell VISTA Systems. The panel wants to be sure that you are aware that an alarm previously occurred, so it makes you clear the faulted zone, even after disarming at the keypad.


Programming a Zone to a 2GIG GC3e

I show you how to program a wireless sensor to a 2GIG GC3e Security System. This is a very important step when setting up a security system. Every sensor used with the system will require at least one zone on the system. When you program the zone, you will set various options and configurations that will determine how the system responds when the associated sensor is faulted. You will also enroll the Serial Number with the GC3e so that the panel can recognize the sensor.


Honeywell 5808W3: Program Low-Temp to Lyric

Alarm Grid Co-Founder Sterling shows you how to program the low-temperature detection function for a Honeywell 5808W3 Smoke Detector to a Honeywell Lyric Alarm System. The Honeywell 5808W3 is a smoke and heat detector that also offers low-temperature detection, which is commonly referred to as freeze detection. The 5808W3 uses Loop Number 3 for low-temperature detection, and it activates a temperatures below 41°F. This is good for letting the user know before the pipes potentially freeze.


Lyric Security System: Change Master Code

Sterling shows you how to change the Master Code on a Honeywell Lyric Security System. The Master Code is used primarily for arming and disarming the system and accessing the Master Tools Menu. It can be used to adjust or change a limited selection of system settings. However, changing most advanced settings and making zone changes will require the Installer Code. We strongly recommend changing the Master Code from its default of 1234 for security purposes. But we advise leaving the Installer Code at its default of 4112.

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