Combination Smoke/Heat Detectors Posts

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Suffering from a serious house fire is an unfortunate reality that many people experience every single year. Understanding the most common causes of house fire can help you take preventive measures and stay prepared. With our helpful tips, you can prevent a serious fire in your home!

Honeywell 5806w3 wireless smoke detector

As a homeowner, it is your duty to make sure that your house is equipped to detect a fire and receive a prompt emergency response. This means installing an alarm system and programming enough smoke and heat detectors to cover the entirety of your house. You should have at least one smoke detector on every floor of your house. There should also be a smoke detector inside each bedroom, as well as inside each large central area, such as living rooms and dens. Hallways are also great locations for smoke detectors. Meanwhile, you can install standalone heat detectors inside areas not suitable for smoke detectors, such as kitchens, garages, attics and bathrooms.

However, a smoke and heat detector won't actually stop a fire from occurring. It will only alert you and/or a central monitoring station to a fire that is already in progress. That is why you need to take proper precautions to prevent fires in your home. If you know how most fires occur, then you can properly do you part to prevent them. With that out of the way, here are the top 10 causes for house fires and ways that you can prevent them.

10. Household Lighting

A light bulb housed inside a glass lighting fixture or light globe has the potential of starting a fire if it is not set up properly. This is especially true if it is very close to a lamp shade or something flammable. Also, knocking over a lamp onto the carpet can cause a fire if you are not careful.

Solution: Make sure to use light bulbs that comply with the recommended wattage specification of the lighting fixture. Also try not to leave lights left on overnight or while you are away. And remember to not place anything flammable around your lights and light bulbs!

9. Flammable Liquids

Many fires in the home occur to the careless use of flammable liquids. This usually concerns fuels such as gasoline or kerosene. However, some fires even occur due to rubbing alcohol or liquor that has been spilled and exposed to an open flame.

Solution: Always label your flammable liquids, and put them in a safe area away from heating sources and open flames. Make sure the other members of your household know not to use these liquids outside of their intended purposes.

8. Outdoor Barbecues

Barbecues are a lot of fun, but they can also turn into a fire hazard! A malfunctioning or greasy grill can cause a fire, as can general carelessness. A gas or propane leak can also result in a serious fire. If the fire manages to reach a tablecloth or household wall, disaster can strike.

Solution: Never use faulty or barbecue equipment, and make sure your grill is cleaned regularly. Always supervise your grill station while cooking to make sure a fire does not occur. You might also consider using natural gas and propane detectors. You might also consider the 2GIG STVGRL1-345 for compatible systems to make sure you do not leave your grill on.

7. Christmas Trees

Christmas trees are a must-have for the holiday season! But they can result in a house fire if you aren't careful. This is especially true if you have a dried-out tree that is surrounded by Christmas lights. Keep in mind that this can potentially happen with any holiday lights!

Solution: Keep your Christmas tree hydrated by watering it regularly and removing any dead wood from the trunk that would prevent it from soaking up water. Make sure you turn off your lights when you go to sleep. If you really want to be careful, just get an artificial fire-safe Christmas tree.

6. Candles

Candles smell great, and they really brighten up a room. But they are also an obvious fire hazard. Some carelessness can quickly result in a house fire and some expensive damage!

Solution: Never leave candles unattended, and make sure you put them out before you leave or go to sleep. Also remember to keep them away from flammable objects like tissue boxes and books. And be sure to avoid knocking a candle over!

5. Electrical Appliances

Many electrical appliances like toasters and clothes dryers can cause fires. This is often the case when the appliance has access to something flammable nearby, such as paper towels or cotton.

Solution: Check your appliances regularly, and replace them if they are faulty. Make sure to supervise your electrical equipment when it is in use. It is also a good idea to keep up with proper maintenance, including cleaning the lint trap in your dryer.

4. Curious Children

If there are children in your household, then they might be curious to know what happens if an object catches fire. A silly mistake or genuine curiosity could result in the end of your home.

Solution: Teach your kids fire-safety at an early age, and make sure they understand the consequences of playing with fire. Supervise younger children, and make sure they are not putting your home at risk. You might even want to enroll your children in a fire-safety class at a school or with your local fire department. Make it a family activity, and consider it a good learning experience for yourself as well.

3. Smoking Indoors

It's your home! If you want to smoke indoors, then that is your right. But just be aware that it can lead to a fire if you aren't careful. Many fires occur in bedrooms while smoking. This is often the case when the person smoking is under the influence of drugs or alcohol.

Solution: To be extra cautious, you should restrict smoking to outdoor areas only. If you really want to smoke indoors, try to avoid doing it in bed or around flammable objects. Better yet, take up vaping, or quit the habit altogether.

2. Heating Equipment

We get it - you need your heater to get through those rough winter months! Maybe you even have a Japanese-style kotatsu that you absolutely love? But that comfort device can quickly result in a fire if you aren't careful.

Solution: Keep your space heating devices away from flammable items and objects like laundry and curtains. Avoid knocking these devices over, and don't use them while unattended. And if you have a furnace, have it inspected regularly!

1. Cooking

Most fires occur in the kitchen due to cooking accidents. It really shouldn't come as much of a surprise. The kitchen is the number one source of fires in the home.

Solution: We would love to tell you to just eat out and avoid cooking altogether. But that isn't really feasible. Instead, we'll just have to give you the same old message as always. Follow safe cooking practices, and never leave your oven or stove unattended. Also make sure to install heat detectors in your kitchen. Maybe take a cooking class if you have a tendency to burn dinner!

If you have any questions about fire-safety, you can always reach out to us for help! The best way to contact us is to email support@alarmgrid.com. Just remember that we usually only respond to emails during our regular business hours of 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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Hi DIYers! Today, we're taking a quick look at the new DSC PG9936 PowerG Smoke & Heat Detector. This device is great for anyone looking for a reliable fire-safety sensor for use with a PowerG-compatible System. The new sensor offers some impressive features, and it is super easy to use!


The DSC PG9936 replaces the older DSC PG9916. The new model features an updated designed and enhanced detection for improved functionality. However, most of the specs from the PG9916 return to the PG9936. If you have an existing PG9916, then it will continue to work just fine. But it's great to see a new smoke and heat detector available!

For smoke detection, the PG9936 uses photoelectric technology. This is arguably the most consistent and more reliable smoke detection method available, and it will help ensure that any fire is detected as quickly as possible. The sensor also features a built-in 135°F fixed temperature heat sensor for redundancy. This will give you peace of mind in knowing that any fire will be properly detected.

Any system that supports PowerG can use the DSC PG9936 Sensor. This includes any Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus and any DSC PowerSeries NEO with added PowerG Receiver. It can be easily auto-enrolled by putting the panel into its enrollment mode and then powering on the PG9936 by inserting its batteries. You are welcome to check out the PG9936 Install Guide for more information.

Also returning to the DSC PG9936 is one-go-all-go support. This means that if the sensor is activated, all other PowerG Smoke Detectors paired with the panel will also activate. This is very important for ensuring that everyone in the building is properly alerted to the fire. Remember that each PowerG Smoke Detector has an 85 dB sounder for alerting building occupants.

Each PG9936 uses three (3) AAA batteries for power (included), and has a three (3) battery life on average. The sensor features a tri-colored LED status light for assisting with enrollment and troubleshooting. It measures five (5) inches across and is 2.5 inches deep. There is a test button on the device for easy testing when needed. Remember to place your system on test mode first!

You can get the PG9936 from the Alarm Grid website right now! If you have any questions about the DSC PG9936 Smoke & Heat Detector or any of our other products, please email us at support@alarmgrid.com. Our support team checks emails between 9am and 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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Hi DIYers! Today, we're taking a look at why one-go-all-go smoke detectors can help ensure that everyone in the building is alerted during a fire. Simply put, a one-go-all-go smoke detector will cause all of the other compatible smoke detectors on the system to activate at the same time.

Dsc fsb 210bt 2 wire addressable photoelectric smoke and heat de

Having all the smokes in your home activate at the same time can be crucial for ensuring that everyone is alerted in the event of a fire. This is especially true for larger homes that need several smoke detectors for complete coverage. Most alarm systems can have some type of interconnected one-go-all-go smoke detector network. However, implementing this feature properly can be difficult, and it requires additional equipment and wiring. Another important thing to remember is that the one-go-all-go feature is best achieved by using the same detector model across the network.

For those with wired alarm control panels, there is often a way to achieve a one-go-all-go setup using hardwired smokes. This is possible with both 2-wire smokes and 4-wire smokes, but both require the proper equipment. Many wired panels offer a way to conveniently reset the zone used for 2-wire smokes after a fire alarm has been cleared. This is needed for getting the smoke detectors to stop sounding and to reset the detector so that it can trip again, if necessary.

For the Honeywell VISTA Panels, all 2-wire smokes must go on zone 1. This zone will automatically reset, and power will be briefly dropped to the smokes after the alarm is cleared. Multiple 2-wire smokes are wired together in parallel, with an end of line resistor (EOLR) for wiring supervision. A good 2-wire smoke detector to use is the System Sensor 2WTA-B, which also includes a built-in sounder.

System sensor 2wta b 2 wire smoke detector with fixed heat and s

Unlike 2-wire smokes, 4-wire smokes have less restriction regarding where they can be wired. In fact, a 4-wire smoke on a Honeywell VISTA System will generally go on any hardwired zone, except for zone 1. Again, the smokes can be configured for a one-go-all-go setup, but this will require additional equipment and wiring. This also allows the smokes to take up fewer systems zones, as they can all use the same zone and programming settings.

One downside to using 4-wire smokes is that they often require additional resources to work properly. In order to get a 4-wire smoke to stop sounding, power to the device must be dropped. But unless the system has a built-in relay, this cannot be done without additional hardware. This can require an external relay, and possibly an additional power supply as well. Proper operation will also require an end-of-line power supervision relay to check whether or not power to the smokes has been interrupted. If you do decide to go the 4-wire route, the System Sensor 4WTA-B is a good option.

System sensor 4wt b 4 wire smoke detector with fixed heat sensor

More recently, certain wireless smoke detectors also offer one-go-all-go functionality. Honeywell really took the initiative here by making their Lyric SiXSMOKE Sensor a one-go-all-go device. This sensor is exclusively compatible with the Honeywell Lyric Alarm System, and provides a very easy way to achieve a robust one-go-all-go setup. One-go-all-go is also compatible with the new Honeywell SiXCOMBO, which also offers heat and CO detection.

Honeywell sixsmoke front wireless smoke slash heat detector for

If you have a different wireless system than the Lyric, then there might still be way to attain a one-go-all-go setup. In most cases, this will require using 4-wire smokes with a compatible wireless transmitter. The transmitter will need to be able to support Normally Open (NO) life-safety devices with an end of line resistor. However, this is not possible for every wired-to-wireless converter.

Additionally the standard equipment for any 4-wire smoke is also required. This includes a relay, power supply and resistor. One transmitter that will work for this application is the Honeywell 5817CBXT. This module is part of the Honeywell 5800 Series, and it will work with nearly any alarm system that accepts the 345 MHz wireless frequency. Remember, the transmitter or converter must communicate at a frequency accepted by the alarm control panel.

Honeywell 5817cb wireless commercial sensor

Additionally, Qolsys recently released the Qolsys IQ Hardwire 16-F for 319.5 MHz systems. This is a 16-zone wired to wireless converter that is great for bringing over hardwired sensors to a newer wireless system. Zone 16 on the module is a Normally Open loop specifically designed for 2-wire smokes. The loop will support up to ten 2-wire smoke devices, which are wired in parallel with an end-of-line resistor. This revolutionary module represents the first way to bring 2-wire smokes over to a wireless all-in-one system. The necessary resistors come included with the module.

Qolsys iq hardwire 16 s qs7131 840

Additionally, if you have an existing network of high-voltage smokes, you can integrate them into a wireless system using a takeover module. These are devices that listen for the unique temporal sound of an activated smoke detector. If the existing smoke detector network is one-go-all-go, a single takeover module can accommodate the entire network. Alarm Grid offers takeover modules that operate at the 319.5 MHz (Interlogix/GE and Qolsys), 345 MHz (Honeywell and 2GIG) and 433 MHz (DSC) wireless frequencies. That way, you can conveniently take an exiting high-voltage smoke network and start using it with your new wireless security system!

If you need help choosing smoke detectors for a one-go-all-go setup, please don't hesitate to reach out to us! We can help you determine the perfect fire-protection devices for your security system. You can send an email to support@alarmgrid.com, or you can call us at (888) 818-7728 during our normal business hours of 9am to 8pm EST M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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