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Welcome to ISC West DIYers! We wanted to get our first post up as soon as we had some juicy details. Right now, we're taking a look at the upcoming Resideo Pro SiX Series. The future of Resideo certainly looks bright with their state-of-the-art equipment that will be coming to the market.


The all-new Pro SiX Series is headlined by the all-in-one wireless panel, the Resideo Pro Series 7" All-In-One Plus. This panel will support the all new lineup of Pro SiX Series wireless sensors. These encrypted sensors will feature the latest technology, as they do everything the current Resideo SiX Series Sensors can do, and more. Users can expect the new Pro SiX Series Sensors to feature convenient auto-enrollment capabilities, an impressive wireless range and highly advanced security to thwart hacking attempts.


Just to be very clear, the Pro SiX Series devices are completely different from the current SiX Series devices. The Pro SiX Series devices will NOT work with the current Lyric Controller. They are being designed exclusively for the new Resideo Pro Series 7" All-In-One Plus.

The Resideo Pro Series 7" All-In-One Plus also offers support for up to four partitions. This will be great for users with roommates and businesses that want to section off different areas. Resideo says that the system will feature a completely new user interface that end users should find simpler and cleaner. If you are used to working with any of the current Honeywell Wireless Panels, you will find the new Resideo Pro Series 7" All-In-One Plus even easier to use.

You may also be excited to know that the system uses Z-Wave Plus technology for home automation. This is a real treat, as the current Lyric Controller only supports classic Z-Wave. End users will surely appreciate the increased battery life and the extended range that comes with Z-Wave Plus and the Resideo Pro Series 7" All-In-One Plus.

And with a new system comes all new devices! The Pro SiX Series lineup is diverse and all-inclusive, as it features all the sensors you would expect to find available. Some highlights include a combination smoke and CO detector, an outdoor siren and an indoor motion viewer with night vision capabilities.

We would like to give special recognition to the Pro SiX Series life-safety sensors. The biggest news is that they are all one-go-all-go. This means that they all tie in with each other. If one actives, every other Pro SiX Series life-safety sensor on the network will activate as well. If your smoke detector activates, your carbon monoxide detector will also go into alarm. Each of these sensors has an 85 dB sounder for alerting anyone on the premises. And with the outdoor siren being available, you can rest assured that those on the outside will be alerted as well.



The indoor motion viewer is also particularly interesting; it's basically a motion sensor with a built-in full-motion video camera. The upcoming device will send 10 second video clips to the end user through Total Connect 2.0. This will be great for confirming a break-in, especially for those in verified response areas. Resideo also says that the video clips will be made available to the central monitoring station so that dispatchers can also confirm an emergency event. And IR night vision is built-in!


Another feature is the ability to support up to eight wireless touchscreen keypads. These keypads feature 7-inch touchscreen displays, and they look like an absolute joy to use. This will be great for users in larger homes or businesses who want to access their systems from multiple on-site locations. And having multiple wireless keypads will certainly tie-in nicely with the ability to establish up to four unique partitions.


Finally, we asked about the backwards compatibility of the Pro Series 7" All-In-One Plus. According to Resideo, the system will only support the new Pro SiX Series out of the box. However, they promised an add-on module that will allow the system to support the legacy 345 MHz frequency used by the Honeywell 5800 Sensors and the 2GIG 345 MHz Sensors. They also stated that the module will be able to support 319.5 MHz sensors (Qolsys and Interlogix/GE), 433 MHz sensors (legacy DSC) and Bosch Sensors.

We will make sure to keep you updated as we learn more about this exciting new lineup from Resideo. Keep checking our blog for more information.

Update: We did receive word that the new Pro Series 7" All-In-One Plus will support existing Honeywell SiX Series Sensors. However, any SiX Series Sensor must be deleted from the current system before it can be enrolled with a Resideo Pro Series Panel. This means that you will need to have access to the system's Installer Programming to clear the settings for the sensor. If Lyric Lock is enabled, then you may need to replace your existing sensors. When the SiX Series Sensor is enrolled with the Pro Series 7" All-In-One Plus, a firmware update will be applied to the sensor to make it compatible with the new equipment.

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If you're reading this message, then the Alarm Grid content and video teams are already in Las Vegas and gearing up for the ISC West 2019 conference. Expect many blog posts, product announcements, interviews and more to appear in the following days, as we attend this exciting annual event.

The best way to stay current with the latest updates is to keep checking the blog you are reading right now. You should also subscribe to the Alarm Grid YouTube Channel, as there will be many video updates as well. We hope that you are as excited as we are for the year's biggest security conference and trade show. Remember, ISC West 2019 runs Wednesday April 10th thru Friday April 12th, and we will have updates throughout! We will let you know the latest news as we learn more!

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Hi DIYers! Unfortunately, we have to keep this news brief, as we are currently preparing for ISC West 2019 in Las Vegas, NV. But a new dual-path communicator from Resideo for their VISTA Systems is now available. Presenting, the all-new Honeywell LTE-IV Verizon LTE Dual-Path Communicator!

The Honeywell LTE-IV uses a hardwired ethernet cable to connect a VISTA Panel to an IP network. If the internet goes down, it will have the ultra-fast and reliable Verizon LTE Cellular Network as a backup. Either way, the system will remain connected with the AlarmNet 360 Servers and the Total Connect 2.0 Service.

This release is huge, as this is currently the only dual-path communicator for a VISTA System that can connect with an LTE Network. Before this, the VISTA Panels had to rely on the Honeywell LTE-XV and Honeywell LTE-XA modules, which had no IP capabilities. Now with the Honeywell LTE-IV, VISTA owners have a dual-path LTE option that will keep their system connected for many years to come!

Note that the Honeywell LTE-IV connects with the Verizon LTE Network. We expect a similar AT&T communicator to be released at some point. You can purchase the Honeywell LTE-IV from the Alarm Grid website. If you have any question, please email support@alarmgrid.com or call (888) 818-7728 from 9am to 8pm EST M-F.

Alarm Grid will post more information about the Honeywell LTE-IV as it becomes available.

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Get ready DIYers! We're here to inform you that next week is the International Security Conference & Exhibition West, more commonly known as ISC West. Our content and video teams will be in Las Vegas, NV to cover all the exciting action and the latest news from the security industry!

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ISC West is the largest converged security industry trade show in the United States. This year's edition runs from Wednesday, April 10th thru Friday April 12th. Our content and video teams will be exploring the massive convention and talking to some of the brightest and sharpest minds in the security industry. We will learn all about the upcoming products and offerings from the industry's leading security and home automation manufacturers - products that you can expect on Alarm Grid soon. And you can be sure that we will keep you posted on all our findings. Expect exclusive pictures, videos, interviews and more, as we bring ISC West directly to you!

From Wednesday thru Friday of this week, you can expect multiple posts per day covering our findings at ISC West 2019. You will certainly want to be checking our blog often, as our goal is to get any important news out quickly. And don't worry if you need help or support during this time! Our support and planner teams will still be at Alarm Grid headquarters to provide you with any assistance you need. Remember, the best way to reach Alarm Grid is to email support@alarmgrid.com. If you need to call us, you can do so at (888) 818-7728 from 9am to 8pm EST M-F. Please don't hesitate to reach out to us, as we love supporting our monitored customers!

Let's get ready for a great ISC West 2019, and make sure to stay tuned for more updates!

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Data Field Programming Guide This is a living document based on Honeywell's Vista 15P, 20P Programming Guide. It is meant to be the programming guide in its entirety, but is a work in progress. We will be continually adding new segments, new videos, and more. Hopefully this guide makes everything a little bit easier for those looking at the document for the first time. Please let us know what we can do to improve it.

Recommendations for Proper Protection

The following recommendations for the location of fire and burglary detection devices help provide proper coverage for the protected premises.

Recommendations for Smoke and Heat Detectors

With regard to the number and placement of smoke/heat detectors, we subscribe to the recommendations contained in the National Fire Protection Association's (NFPA) Standard #72 noted below.Early warning fire detection is best achieved by the installation of fire detection equipment in all rooms and areas of the household as follows: For minimum protection a smoke detector should be installed outside of each separate sleeping area, and on each additional floor of a multi-floor family living unit, including basements. The installation of smoke detectors in kitchens, attics (finished or unfinished), or in garages is not normally recommended. For additional protection the NFPA recommends that you install heat or smoke detectors in the living room, dining room, bedroom(s), kitchen, hallway(s), attic, furnace room, utility and storage rooms, basements and attached garages. In addition, we recommend the following:

  • Install a smoke detector inside every bedroom where a smoker sleeps.
  • Install a smoke detector inside every bedroom where someone sleeps with the door partly or completely closed. Smoke could be blocked by the closed door. Also, an alarm in the hallway outside may not wake up the sleeper if the door is closed.
  • Install a smoke detector inside bedrooms where electrical appliances (such as portable heaters, air conditioners or humidifiers) are used.
  • Install a smoke detector at both ends of a hallway if the hallway is more than 40 feet (12 meters) long.
  • Install smoke detectors in any room where an alarm control is located, or in any room where alarm control connections to an AC source or phone lines are made. If detectors are not so located, a fire within the room could prevent the control from reporting a fire or an intrusion.

This control complies with NFPA requirements for temporal pulse sounding of fire notification appliances.

Recommendations For Proper Intrusion Protection

For proper intrusion coverage, sensors should be located at every possible point of entry to a home or commercial premises. This would include any skylights that may be present, and the upper windows in a multi-level building. In addition, we recommend that radio backup be used in a security system so that alarm signals can still be sent to the alarm monitoring station in the event that the telephone lines are out of order (alarm signals are normally sent over the phone lines, if connected to an alarm monitoring station).

Contents

  • Programming Mode Commands
  • Data Field Programming Form
  • Configurable Zone Types Worksheet
  • *56 Zone Programming Menu Mode
  • *58 Expert Zone Program Mode
  • WIRELESS KEY PROGRAMMING TEMPLATES
  • *57 FUNCTION KEY PROGRAMMING MENU MODE
  • *79/*80 MENU MODE - OUTPUT DEVICE PROGRAMMING GENERAL INFORMATION
  • *79 RELAY/POWERLINE CARRRIER DEVICE (X-10) PROGRAMMING MENU MODE
  • *80 OUTPUT FUNCTION MENU MODE
  • *81 ZONE LIST MENU MODE
  • *82 ALPHA DESCRIPTOR MENU MODE
  • ALPHA VOCABULARY LIST (For Entering Zone Descriptors)
  • SETTING SCHEDULES
  • AVS SYSTEM ENABLE and QUICK PROGRAMMING COMMANDS
  • SETTING THE REAL-TIME CLOCK
  • *29 COMMUNICATION DEVICE MENU MODE (Pass-Through Programming)
  • UPLOADING/DOWNLOADING VIA the INTERNET
  • ZONE TYPE DEFINITIONS
  • REPORT CODE FORMATS
  • SYSTEM SECURITY CODES
  • KEYPAD FUNCTIONS
  • VARIOUS SYSTEM TROUBLE DISPLAYS
  • UL NOTICES
  • SIA QUICK REFERENCE GUIDE
  • ULC S304 REQUIREMENTS (for VISTA-15PCN and VISTA-20PCN)
  • FCC STATEMENTS
  • LIMITATIONS STATEMENT
  • CONTACTING TECHNICAL SUPPORT
  • WORKSHEET for *56 ZONE PROGRAMMING
  • WORKSHEET for *57 FUNCTION KEY PROGRAMMING
  • WORKSHEET for *79 OUTPUT RELAY/POWERLINE CARRIER DEVICE PROGRAMMING
  • WORKSHEET for *81 ZONE LIST PROGRAMMING
  • WORKSHEET for *80 OUTPUT FUNCTION PROGRAMMING
  • WORKSHEET for SCHEDULES
  • TABLE OF DEVICE ADDRESSES
  • 5800 SERIES TRANSMITTER INPUT LOOP IDENTIFICATION

Programming Mode Commands

To enter programming mode (using an alpha keypad connected to the control):

  • POWER UP, then press [*] and [#] at the same time, within 50 seconds of powering up (this method must be used if *98 was used to exit program mode). OR
  • Enter Installer Code (Default: 4112) then 800
Task Command/Explanation
Go to a Data Field Press [∗] + [Field Number], followed by the required entry.
Entering Data When the desired field number appears, simply make the required entry. When the last entry for a field is entered, the keypad beeps three times and automatically displays the next data field in sequence. If the number of digits that you need to enter in a data field is less than the maximum digits available (for example, the phone number fields *41, *42), enter the desired data, then press [∗] to end the entry. The next data field number is displayed.
Review a Data Field Press [#] + [Field Number]. Data will be displayed for that field number. No changes will be accepted in this mode
Deleting an Entry Press [*] + [Field Number] + [*]. (Applies only to fields ∗40 thru *46, *94, and pager fields) Press *96.
Initialize Download ID Press *96. Initializes download ID and subscriber account number.
Reset Factory Defaults Press *97. Sets all data fields to original factory default values.
Zone Programming Press *56. Zone characteristics, report codes, alpha descriptors, and serial numbers for 5800 RF transmitters.
Function Key Programming Press *57. Unlabeled keypad keys (known as ABCD keys) can be programmed for special functions
Zone Programming (Expert Mode) Press *58. Same options as *56 mode, but with fewer prompts. Intended for those familiar with this type of programming, otherwise *56 mode is recommended.
Output Device Mapping Press *79. Assign module addresses and map individual relays/powerline carrier devices.
Output Programming Press *80. Program 4229 or 4204 Relay modules, Powerline Carrier devices, or on-board triggers.
Zone List Programming Press *81. Zone Lists for relay/powerline carrier activation, chime zones, pager zones, etc.
Alpha Programming Press *82. Zone alpha descriptorsIP/GSM ProgrammingPress *29. For programming the IP/GSM options.
Exit Program Mode with installer code lockout Press *98. Exits programming mode and prevents re-entry by: Installer Code + 8 0 0. To reenter programming mode, the system must be powered down, then powered up. Then use method A above. See field *88 for other *98 Program mode lockout options.
Exit Program Mode Press *99. Exits program mode and allows re-entry by: Installer Code + 8 0 0 or method A above.
Scheduling Mode Enter code + [#] + 64. Create schedules to automate various system functions.
Site-Initiated Download Enter Installer code + [#] + 1. (perform while system is disarmed and in normal mode)

AVS Quick Programming Guide (for AAV sessions using the AVS system)

For controls with the following firmware revision levels, these commands automatically configure the control for AVS operation:

  • VISTA-15P = version 6.0 or higher
  • VISTA-20P = version 7.0 or higher

Programming Instructions

  • installer code + [#] + [0] + 3. Enable AVS operation.
  • installer code + [#] + [0] + 4. Enable AVS operation and enable panels sounds on the AVST speaker.
  • installer code + [#] + [0] + 5. Remove all programming options set by [#] + [0] + 3 quick command.
  • installer code + [#] + [0] + 6. Remove all programming options set by [#] + [0] + 4 quick command.

Refer to the AVS System Enable and Quick Programming Commands section for details on the specific options that are set with each command, depending on the control used. To select the AAV session communication path (phone line/communication device), see field ∗55 Dynamic Signaling Priority. To enable AAV operation, use ∗91 Options field (option 4).

Special Programming Messages

  • OC = Open Circuit (no communication between Keypad and Control).
  • EE or ENTRY ERROR = ERROR (invalid field number entered; re-enter valid field number).
  • After powering up, AC, dI (disabled) or “Busy Standby vx.x (firmware revision) Dl will be displayed after approximately 4 seconds. This will revert to a “Ready” message in approximately 1 minute, which allows PIRS, etc. to stabilize. You can bypass this delay by pressing [#] + [0].
    NOTE for CANADIAN PANELS: Power up time is 2 minutes, and Contact ID report code 305 System Reset is sent if the [#] + [0]command is not performed before the 2 minutes expires.
  • If E4 or E8 appears, more zones than the expansion units can handle have been programmed. The display will clear after you correct the programming

IMPORTANT: The Real-time clock must be set before the end of the installation. See procedure in the Setting the Real-Time Clock section of this manual.

Data Field Programming Guide

Input Command Explanation Video
*20 Installer Code.
Enter 4 digits between 0000 and 9999.
The Installer Code (default 4-1-1-2) is used to assign the 4-digit Master Security Code (default 1-2-3-4). The Installer Code can perform all system functions except it cannot disarm the system unless it was used to arm the system. For security purposes, the factory default installer code should be changed.
*21 Quick Arm Enable
  • 0 = no
  • 1 = yes
If enabled, users can press the [#] followed by an arming key to arm the system instead of using a security code. The security code is always needed to disarm the system.
*22 RF Jam Option
  • 0 = no RF Jam detection
  • 1 = send RF Jam report
If enabled, a report is sent if the system detects an RF jamming signal.

UL Note: Must be 1 if Wireless sensors are used.
*23 Quick (Forced) Bypass
  • 0 = no quick bypass
  • 1 = allow quick bypass (code + [6] + [#] )

Zones bypassed by this function will be displayed after the bypass is initiated.

*24 RF House ID Code
  • 00 = disable all wireless keypad use
  • 01–31 = using 5827, 5827BD or
  • 5804BD keypad

The House ID identifies receivers and wireless keypads. If a 5827 or 5827BD Wireless Keypad or 5804BD Transmitter is being used, a House ID code must be entered and the keypad set to the same House ID. You can assign RF house ID for each partition.
*26 Chime By Zone / KP Sound Enables Entry 1
  • 0 = no “entry 1” keypad trouble sounds, AND no chime by zone (keypad chimes on fault of any entry/exit or perimeter zone when chime mode is on)
  • 1 = Chime by Zone enabled
  • 2 = Communication Device (LRR) trouble sounding enabled (for communication devices such as 7845GSM, 7845i-GSM, GSMV)
  • 4 = System Low Battery sounding enabled
  • 7 = select all entry 1 options
Entry 2
  • 0 = no “entry 2” keypad trouble sounds
  • 1 = RF Supervision sounding enabled
  • 2 = RF Low Battery sounding enabled
  • 4 = RF Jam sounding enabled
  • 7 = select all entry 2 options

Chime by Zone

If Chime by Zone is enabled (entry 1 – option 1), you can define the specific zones intended to chime when faulted while the system is in Chime mode. List chime zones on zone list 3 using *81 Menu mode.

Keypad (KP) Trouble Sounding

Keypad trouble sounding can be enabled/disabled for the conditions listed for each entry.

For each entry, enter the sum of the desired options. Example Entry 1: for Chime by Zone and System Low Battery sounding, enter 5. To enable all options, enter 7.

*27 Powerline Carrier Device (X–10) House Code
  • 0 = A
  • 1 = B
  • 2 = C
  • 3 = D
  • 4 = E
  • 5 = F
  • 6 = G
  • 7 = H
  • 8 = I
  • 9 = J
  • #10 = K
  • #11 = L
  • #12 = M
  • #13 = N
  • #14 = O
  • #15 = P
Powerline Carrier devices require a House ID, identified in this field.

Program Powerline Carrier devices in interactive modes *79, *80 and *81.

UL Note: UL: not for fire or UL installations
*28
  • Access Code For Phone Module
  • 00 = disable
  • 1st digit: enter 1–9
  • 2nd digit: enter # + 11 for "∗", or # + 12 for "#".

[00] partion 1 only

You must assign a 2-digit access code for the 4286 Phone Module, if used. Example: If desired access code is 7∗, then 7 is the first entry, and [#] + 11 (for ∗) is the second entry.

NOTE: A 0 in either digit disables the phone module.

UL Note: UL: must be 00 for UL Commercial Burglary installations.

*29 Enable IP/GSM? – Communication Device Menu Mode (pass-through programming)

This is a Menu Mode command, not a data field, for programming IP/GSM communication device options. See *29 Menu Mode section later in this document.

*31 Single Alarm Sounding Per Zone
  • 0 = unlimited sounding
  • 1 = one alarm sounding per zone

V20PSIA/V15PSIA. If “0” selected, “alarm sounding per zone” will be the same as the “number of reports in armed period” set in field *93 (1 if one report, 2 if 2 reports, unlimited for zones in zone list 7).

▢ [0]

If enabled, limits alarm sounding on the bell output to once per zone per armed period.

*32 Fire Alarm Sounder Timeout
  • 0 = sound stops at timeout selected in field *33
  • 1 = no timeout; sounds until manually turned off

▢[0]

This control complies with NFPA requirements for temporal pulse sounding of fire notification appliances. Temporal pulse sounding for a fire alarm consists of the following: 3 pulses – pause – 3 pulses – pause – 3 pulses.

UL: must be 1 for fire installation

*33 Alarm Sounder (Bell) Timeout
  • 0 = none
  • 3 =12 min
  • 1 = 4 min
  • 4 = 16 min
  • 2 = 8 min

▢[1]

This field determines whether the external sounder will shut off after time allotted, or continue until manually turned off

  • UL: For residential fire alarm installation, must be set for a minimum of 4 min (option 1)
  • For Commercial Burglary installations, must be minimum 16 min (option 4)
*34 Exit Delay
  • 00 - 96 = 0 - 96 secs
  • 97 = 120 secs

V20PSIA/V15PSIA:

  • 45 - 96 = 45 - 96 secs
  • 97 = 120 secs
  • NOTE: Entries less than 45 will result in a 45-second delay.
The system waits the time entered before arming entry/exit zones. If the entry/exit door is left open after this time expires, an alarm will occur. Common zones use same delay as partition 1.

SIA Guidelines: minimum exit delay is 45 seconds Common zones use partition 1 delay.

*35 Entry Delay #1

00 - 96 = 0 - 96 seconds

97 = 120 secs

98 = 180 secs

99 = 240 secs

V20PSIA/V15PSIA:

30-96 = 30 - 96 secs; 97 = 120 secs;

98 = 180 secs; 99 = 240 secs

NOTE: Entries less than 30 will result

in a 30-second delay

Upon entering, the system must be disarmed before the time entered

expires, otherwise it sounds an alarm.

Common zones use same delay as part 1.

SIA Guidelines: minimum entry delay is 30 seconds

*36 Entry Delay #2

See *35 Entry Delay 1 for entries

*37 Audible Exit Warning

0 = no; 1 = yes

Warning sound consists of slow continuous beeps until the last 10

seconds, and then it changes to fast beeps. Sound ends when exit time

expires.

SIA Guidelines: must be enabled

*38 Confirmation Of Arming Ding

0 = no

1 = yes (wired keypads and RF)

2 = yes, RF only (except 5827,

5827BD)

Confirmation of arming is 1/2-sec external sounder “ding.”

If 1 selected, ding occurs when closing report is sent if open/close

reporting is enabled, or at the end of Exit Delay. If 2 selected, ding

occurs upon reception of the wireless arming command.

*39 Power Up In Previous State

0 = no, always power up disarmed;

1 = yes, power up in previous state

When the system powers up armed, an alarm will occur 1 minute after

arming if a zone is faulted. Note that if the previous state was armed

Away or Stay, the system ignores sensor changes for 1 minute, which

allows sensors such as PIRs to stabilize.

UL: must be 1

SIA Guidelines: must be 1
*40 PABX Access Code or Call

Waiting Disable

Enter up to 6 digits.

To clear entries, press

*

40

!

.

If call waiting is used, enter call waiting

disable digits “



(#+11) 70” plus “# +

13” (pause).

Call Waiting:

If the subscriber’s phone service has “call waiting” (and

is not using PABX), enter “*70” (“# + 11”) plus “# + 13” (pause) as the

PABX entry to disable “call waiting” during control panel calls. If the

subscriber does not have “call waiting” and is not using PABX, make

no entry in this field.

NOTES:

1. The call waiting disable feature cannot be used on a PABX line.

2. Using Call Waiting Disable on a non-call waiting line will prevent

successful communication to the central station.
*41, *42 Primary Phone No.

Secondary Phone No.

Enter up to 20 digits. To clear entries, press

!

41

!

or

!

42

!

respectively

.

Enter the respective phone numbers.

*43 Partition 1 Primary Acct. No.
[FFFFFFFFFF]
*44 Part. 1 Secondary Acct. No.



*45 Partition 2 Primary Acct. No.


*46 Partition 2 Secondary Acct. No.

Enter 4 or 10 digits, as chosen in *48

Report Format. Enter digits 0–9; #+11

for B; #+12 for C; #+13 for D; #+14 for

E; #+15 for F.
Enter [



] as the fourth digit if a 3-digit account number (for 3+1 dialer

reporting format) is used. Enter 0 as the first digit of a 4-digit account

no. for 0000-0999. E.g., For Acct.

B234

, enter: #+11 + 2 + 3 + 4

To clear entries in a given field, press *43*, *44*, *45*, or *46* based

on the field being programmed

*47 Phone System Select

If Cent. Sta.

is not

on a WATS line:

0=Pulse Dial; 1=Tone Dial

If Cent. Sta.

is

on

a WATS line:

2 = Pulse Dial; 3 = Tone Dial.
Select the type of phone service for the installation.
*48 Report Format
  • 0 = 3+1, 4+1 ADEMCO L/S STANDARD.
  • 1 = 3+1, 4+1 RADIONICS STANDARD.
  • 2 = 4+2 ADEMCO L/S STAND.
  • 3 = 4+2 RADIONICS STANDARD.
  • 5 = 10-digit ADEMCO CONTACT ID REPORTING.
  • 6 = 4+2 ADEMCO EXPRESS.
  • 7 = 4-digit ADEMCO CONTACT ID REPORTING.
  • 8 = 3+1, 4+1 ADEMCO L/S EXP.
  • 9 = 3+1, 4+1 RADIONICS EXP.
Select the format for primary/secondar phone numbers
*49 Split/Dual Reporting

0 = Standard/backup reporting only (all

to primary)

1-5 = see table at right

Backup Reporting:

All reports are sent only to the primary number

unless unsuccessful after 8 attempts. If unsuccessful, the system will

make up to 8 attempts to send all reports to the secondary number. If

still unsuccessful after the 16 attempts, the system displays the

“COMM. FAILURE” message (FC for fixed-word displays).

*50 Burglary Dialer Delay

Delay Time:

0 = no delay

1 = 15 seconds

2 = 30 seconds

3 = 45 seconds

V20PSIA/V15PSIA:

Delay Time:

1 = 15 seconds

2 = 30 seconds

3 = 45 seconds

Delay Disable:

0 = use delay set in entry 1

1 = dial delay disabled for zones

listed in zone list 6 (use zone list 6

to enter those zones that require

dial delay to be disabled; these

zones ignore the setting in entry 1)

UL: Dial delay plus entry delay must not

exceed one minute; use zone list 6 to

disable dial delay from appropriate zones,

if necessary.

Provides delay of “BURGLARY ALARM” report to the central station,

which allows time for the subscriber to avoid a false alarm transmission.

This delay does not apply to zone type 24 alarms (silent burglary) or to

24-hour zone types 6, 7, and 8 (silent panic, audible alarm, auxiliary

alarm), which are always sent as soon as they occur.

UL: Delay Time must be 0

SIA Guidelines: delay must be minimum of 15 seconds

*53 SESCOA/Radionics Select

0 = Radionics (0-9, B-F)

1 = SESCOA (0-9 only reporting)

Enter 0 for all non-SESCOA formats.
*54 Dynamic Signaling Delay

0 = no delay (both signals sent)

1 = 15 secs

2 = 30 secs, etc.

Select delay from 0 to 225 secs, in 15-sec increments.

Intended for reporting via a communication device on the ECP bus

(LRR). This field lets you select the time the panel should wait for

acknowledgment from the first reporting destination (see



55) before it

attempts to send a message to the second destination. Delays can be

selected from 0 to 225 seconds, in 15-second increments. This delay is

per message. If 0 is entered in this field, the control panel will send

redundant reports to both Primary Dialer and communication device.

*55 Dynamic Signaling Priority /

AAV Path Select

0 = Primary Dialer first / AAV via phone

line

1 = Communication Device (LRR) first /

AAV via communication device

path (see AAV Path Select

paragraph at right)

This field selects the primary communication path for reporting (dialer

or communication device) of

primary phone number

events



(see



49

Split/Dual Reporting)

and

selects the communication path used for

AAV sessions (phone line or communication device path). Use



29

IP/GSM menu mode to enable the communication device being used.



Reports intended for the secondary phone number are not sent via

the communication device.

For Dynamic Signaling Priority:

Select the initial reporting destination

for messages as follows:

Primary Dialer First selected (

0

):



If acknowledged before delay expires (see



54), then message will

not be sent via LRR.



If not acknowledged before delay expires, message is sent to both

the Primary Phone No. and via LRR.

Communication Device (LRR) First selected (

1

):



If acknowledged before delay expires, then message will not be sent

to the primary dialer.



If not acknowledged before delay expires, message is sent to both

the Primary Phone No. and via LRR.

*56, *57, *58 Menu Modes. These are Menu Mode commands, not data fields, for Zone Programming, Function Key Programming, and Expert Mode Zone Programming respectively. Alarm Grid provides worksheets for the *56 and the *57 menu

System Status Report Codes (*59–*68)

Input Command Explanation Video
*59
*60
*61
*62
*63
*64
*65
*66
*67
*68
*69
*70
*71
*72
*73
*74
*75
*76
*77
*78
*79, *80, *81, *82 Menu Modes. These are Menu Mode commands, not data fields, for Output Device Mapping, Output Programming, Zone List Programming, and Alpha Programming respectively. Click on the zone numbers above to be taken to the appropriate section of this guide. Additionally, we provide a pdf version of the *79, the *80, and the *81 programming worksheets.
*84
*85
*86
*87
*88
*89
*90
*91
*92
*93
*94
*95
*96, *97 Initialize/Reset Defaults. These are commands, not data fields.
*98, *99 Exit commands. These are commands, not data fields.
*160
*161
*162
*163
*164
*165
*166
*167
*168
*169
*170
*171
*172
*174
*177
*181 50/60 Hertz AC Operation
0 = 60 Hz; 1 = 50 Hz
[0]
Select the type of AC power applied to the control (option is used for Real-Time Clock synchronization)
CONFIGURABLE ZONE TYPE OPTIONS (*182-*185)
(see Configurable Zone Type Worksheet following data field *199)
  • The system allows you to define custom zone types (VISTA-20P supports 4 [types 90-93]; VISTA-15P supports 2 [types 90, 91]) based on the options selected.
  • All configurable zone types can be programmed via the downloader. Zone types 90-91 can also be programmed from a keypad using data fields *182-*185.
  • IMPORTANT: Be careful when selecting combinations of options for configurable zone types. Contradictory options can cause unpredictable results.
Configurable Zone Type Options >
Auto Restore (entry 2): Faults on zones set for this option are cleared; restore messages sent upon restoral of faults.
Vent Zone (entry 2): Zones set for this option are ignored if faulted when arming the system, but are protected if the zone is later restored (e.g., an open window can be ignored when arming, but if the window is later closed, it will be protected; opening the window again causes an alarm.)
Bypass Disarmed (entry 4): Zones set for this option can be bypassed only while the system is disarmed.
Bypass Armed (entry 4): Zones set for this option can be bypassed when the system is armed.
Dial Delay (entry 6): Alarms on zones set for this option participate in dial delay central station reporting, if system dial delay enabled in field *50.
Fault Delay (entry 6): Faults on zones set for this option are delayed by the time set in field *87. Do not use this option if using entry/exit delay for this zone type.
Faults Display (entry 7): Selects how faults on zones set for this zone type are displayed.
Power Reset/Verification (entry 7): Selects whether the system resets power (when user enters code + OFF), and whether the system performs alarm verification (see description for zone type 16 in Zone Type Definitions section) when a fault occurs on these zones.
Use Entry Delay (entry 8): Selects whether to use the system’s entry delay times.
Use Exit Delay (entry 8): Selects whether to use the system’s exit delay time.
Interior Type (entry 8): Zones set for this option are treated same as standard zone type 4 (bypasses when armed STAY, faults displayed). Alarm Sounds (entry 9): Selects the type of alarms sound for zones set for this zone type.
Bell Timeout (entry 9): Alarm sounding on zones set for this option remain for the duration set in fields *32 / *33.
Fire Zone (entry 9): Zones set for this option respond in the same manner as if programmed for zone type 9. Do not set fire zones to respond as a “fault” in entries 1-6.
Trouble Sounds (entry 10): Selects the type of trouble sounds for zones set for this zone type (periodic beeps = once every 30 seconds; trouble beeps = rapid beeping).
Chime Enable (entry 10): Zones set for this option cause a chime when Chime mode is on.
*182
*183
*184
*185
*189
*190
*191
*192
*193
*194
*195
*196
*197
*198
*199

*56 Zone Programming Menu Mode

(press *56 while in Program mode) Use the provided *56 Zone Programming Worksheet.

Zones and Partitions Each protection zone needs to be programmed with various attributes using *56 Zone Programming mode or *58 Expert Programming Mode. Using this mode, enter the zone number to be programmed and make appropriate entries at the prompts. Finally, Confirm the serial number of wireless transmitter zones. The VISTA-20P system can control two independent areas of protection (known as partitions) for use by independent users, if desired, by simply assigning zones to one or the other partition during zone programming. The VISTA-20P, by default, automatically distributes users between the two partitions. The master user can change the user number distributions. Zones can also be assigned to a common partition, which is an area shared by users of both partitions (such as a lobby in a building). This allows either partition to arm, while leaving the common partition disarmed for access into the other partition. The following describes the functioning of the VISTA-20P common partition:

  • The common zone sounds and reports alarms only when both partitions are armed. If only one partition is armed, the system ignores faults on the common zone.
  • Either partition may arm its system if the common zone is faulted, but once armed, the other partition will not be able to arm unless the common zone is first bypassed or the fault is corrected.
  • Faults on the common zone are displayed on common zone keypads, and will also appear on another partition’s keypad when that partition is armed.
  • Either partition can clear and restore the common zone after an alarm.

*56 Menu Mode

Wireless Key Predefined Default Templates

Templates Loop Function Zone Type
Template 1
1
2
3
4

No response
Disarm
Arm Away
No Response

23
22
21
23
Template 2
1
2
3
4

No Response
Disarm
Arm Away
Arm Stay

23
22
21
20
Template 3
1
2
3
4

24-hour audible
Disarm
Arm Away
Arm Stay

7
22
21
20
Template 4
1
2
3
4

No Response
No Response
Arm Away
Disarm

23
23
21
22
Template 5
1
2
3
4

No Response
Arm Stay
Arm Away
Disarm

23
20
21
22
Template 6
1
2
3
4

24-hour audible
Arm Stay
Arm Away
Disarm

7
20
21
22
Prompt Valid Entries Explanation Video

Alpha Descriptor Vocabulary List (For Entering Zone Descriptors)

Descriptor Number Word
A
000 (Word Space)
  • 001
AIR
  • 002
ALARM *
004 ALLEY
005 AMBUSH
  • 006
AREA
  • 007
APARTMENT
  • 009
ATTIC *
010 AUDIO
B
  • 012
BABY *
  • 013
BACK *
  • 014
BAR
  • 016
BASEMENT *
  • 017
BATHROOM *
  • 018
BED
  • 019
BEDROOM *
020 BELL
  • 021
BLOWER
  • 022
BOILER
023 BOTTOM
025 BREAK
  • 026
BUILDING
C
028 CABINET
  • 029
CALL
030 CAMERA
031 CAR
033 CASH
034 CCTV
035 CEILING
036 CELLAR
  • 037
CENTRAL
038 CIRCUIT
  • 040
CLOSED *
  • 046
COMPUTER
047 CONTACT
D
  • 048
DAUGHTERS
049 DELAYED
  • 050
DEN *
051 DESK
  • 052
DETECTOR *
  • 053
DINING *
054 DISCRIMINATOR
055 DISPLAY
  • 057
DOOR *
  • 059
DOWN
  • 060
DOWNSTAIRS
061 DRAWER
  • 062
DRIVEWAY
  • 064
DUCT
E
  • 065
EAST
066 ELECTRIC
067 EMERGENCY *
068 ENTRY
  • 069
EQUIPMENT
  • 071
EXIT *
072 EXTERIOR
F
  • 073
FACTORY
075 FAMILY
  • 076
FATHERS
  • 077
FENCE
  • 079
FIRE *
  • 080
FLOOR *
081 FLOW
082 FOIL
  • 083
FOYER
084 FREEZER
  • 085
FRONT *
G
  • 089
GARAGE *
  • 090
GAS
091 GATE
  • 092
GLASS
093 GUEST
094 GUN
H
  • 095
HALL *
  • 096
HEAT
098 HOLDUP
099 HOUSE *
100 INFRARED
  • 101
INSIDE *
102 INTERIOR
103 INTRUSION
J
104 JEWELRY
K
  • 105
KITCHEN *
L
  • 106
LAUNDRY *
  • 107
LEFT
108 LEVEL
  • 109
LIBRARY *
  • 110
LIGHT
111 LINE
  • 113
LIVING *
  • 114
LOADING
115 LOCK
116 LOOP
117 LOW
  • 118
LOWER
M
  • 119
MACHINE
121 MAIDS
122 MAIN *
  • 123
MASTER *
  • 125
MEDICAL *
126 MEDICINE
128 MONEY
129 MONITOR
  • 130
MOTHERS
  • 131
MOTION *
132 MOTOR
N
  • 134
NORTH
135 NURSERY
O
  • 136
OFFICE *
  • 138
OPEN *
139 OPENING
  • 140
OUTSIDE
142 OVERHEAD
P
143 PAINTING
  • 144
PANIC *
145 PASSIVE
  • 146
PATIO *
147 PERIMETER
  • 148
PHONE
150 POINT
151 POLICE *
152 POOL *
  • 153
POWER
R
155 RADIO
  • 156
REAR
157 RECREATION
159 REFRIGERATION
160 RF
  • 161
RIGHT
  • 162
ROOM *
163 ROOF
S
164 SAFE
165 SCREEN
166 SENSOR
  • 167
SERVICE
  • 168
SHED *
169 SHOCK
  • 170
SHOP *
171 SHORT
  • 173
SIDE *
174 SKYLIGHT
175 SLIDING *
  • 176
SMOKE *
  • 178
SONS
  • 179
SOUTH
180 SPRINKLER
  • 182
STATION
184 STORE
  • 185
STORAGE *
186 STORY
190 SUPERVISED *
191 SUPERVISION
192 SWIMMING
193 SWITCH
T
194 TAMPER
196 TELCO
197 TELEPHONE
  • 199
TEMPERATURE
200 THERMOSTAT
  • 201
TOOL
202 TRANSMITTER
U
  • 205
UP
  • 206
UPPER
  • 207
UPSTAIRS *
  • 208
UTILITY *
V
209 VALVE
210 VAULT
212 VOLTAGE
W
213 WALL
214 WAREHOUSE
  • 216
WEST
  • 217
WINDOW *
  • 219
WING
220 WIRELESS
X
222 XMITTER
Y
223 YARD
Z
224 ZONE (No.)
  • 225
ZONE *
  • 226
0
  • 227
1
  • 228
1ST *
  • 229
2
  • 230
2ND *
  • 231
3
  • 232
3RD *
  • 233
4
  • 234
4TH
  • 235
5
  • 236
5TH
  • 237
6
  • 238
6TH
  • 239
7
  • 240
7TH
  • 241
8
  • 242
8TH
  • 243
9
  • 244
9TH
245 Custom Word #1
246 Custom Word #2
247 Custom Word #3
248 Custom Word #4
249 Custom Word #5
250 Custom Word #6
251 Custom Word #7
252 Custom Word #8
253 Custom Word #9
254 Custom Word #10

*Note: Bulleted (•) words in boldface type are those that are also available for use by the 4286 Phone Module. If using a Phone module, and words other than these are selected for Alpha descriptors, the module will not provide annunciation of those words.
Italicized words followed by an asterisk indicates those words supported by the 6160V/6150V Voice Keypads.

CHARACTER (ASCII) CHART (For Adding Custom Words)
32 (space)
33 !
34 "
35 #
36 $
37 %
38 &
39 '
40 (
41 )
42 *
43 +
44 ,
45
46 .
47 /
48 0
49 1
50 2
51 3
52 4
53 5
54 6
55 7
56 8
57 9
58 :
59 ;
60 <
61 =
62 >
63 ?
64 @
65 A
66 B
67 C
68 D
69 E
70 F
71 G
72 H
73 I
74 J
75 K
76 L
77 M
78 N
79 O
80 P
81 Q
82 R
83 S
84 T
85 U
86 V
87 W
88 X
89 Y
90 Z

UL NOTICES
  1. Entry Delay No. 1 and No. 2 (fields ∗35, ∗36) cannot be greater than 30 seconds for UL Residential Burglar Alarm installations, and entry delay plus dial delay should not exceed 1 minute. For UL Commercial Burglar Alarm installations, total entry delay may not exceed 45 seconds.
  2. For UL Commercial Burglar Alarm and UL Residential Burglar Alarm installations with line security, total exit delay time must not exceed 60 seconds.
  3. The maximum number of reports per armed period (field ∗93) must be set to “0” (unlimited) for UL installations.
  4. Periodic testing (see scheduling mode) must be at least every 24 hours.
  5. Alarm Sounder plus Auxiliary Power currents must not exceed 600mA total for UL installations (Aux power 500mA max.).
  6. All partitions must be owned and managed by the same person(s).
  7. All partitions must be part of one building at one street address.
  8. If used, the audible alarm device(s) must be placed where it/they can be heard by all partitions.
  9. For UL commercial burglar alarm installations the control unit must be protected from unauthorized access. The tamper switchinstalled to protect the control unit enclosure door is suitable for this purpose.
  10. Remote downloading without an alarm company technician on-site (unattended downloading) is not permissible for UL installations.
  11. Auto-disarming is not a UL Listed feature.
  12. As SIA limits for delay of alarm reporting and sounding can exceed UL limits for commercial and residential applications, the following UL requirements per UL681 are provided: The maximum time that a control unit shall be programmed to delay the transmission of a signal to a remote monitoring location, or to delay the energizing of a local alarm sounding device to permit the alarm system user to enter and disarm the system, or to arm the system and exit shall not exceed:
    1. 60 seconds for a system with standard line security or encrypted line security,
    2. 120 seconds for a system without standard line security or encrypted line security, or
    3. 120 seconds for a system that does not transmit an alarm signal to a remote monitoring location.
  13. This control is not intended for bank safe and vault applications.

SIA Quick Reference Guide
  1. *31 Single Alarm Sounding per Zone: If “0” selected, “alarm sounding per zone” will be the same as the “number of reports in armed period” set in field ∗93 (1 if one report, 2 if 2 reports, unlimited for zones in zone list 7).
  2. *34 Exit Delay. Minimum exit delay is 45 seconds.
  3. *35/*36 Entry Delay 1 and 2. Minimum entry delay is 30 seconds.
  4. *37 Audible Exit Warning: Feature always enabled; field does not exist.
  5. *39 Power Up in Previous State: Must be “1,” power up in previous state.
  6. *40 PABX Access Code or Call Waiting Disable: If call waiting is used, call waiting disable option in field *91 must be set.
  7. *50 Burglary Dial Delay: Delay must be minimum of 30 seconds.
  8. *59 Exit Error Alarm Report Code: Always enabled. 9 ∗68 Cancel Report Code: Default is “code enabled.”
  9. *68 Cancel Report Code: Default is "code enabled."
  10. *69 Recent Closing Report Code: Always enabled.
  11. *91 Option Selection: Exit Delay option should be enabled. If call waiting is used, Call Waiting Disable must be set to “1” (enabled).
  12. *93 No. reports in Armed Period: Must be set for 1 or 2 report pairs.
  13. Cross zone timer programming is set in field ∗85; cross zone pairs are assigned in zone list 4 using ∗81 Zone List mode.
  14. Duress code is assigned by using the “add a user code” procedure found in the User Guide. Enable Duress code reporting by programming zone 92 using ∗56 Zone Programming mode.
  15. Fire alarm verification is a built-in system feature when a zone is programmed for zone type 16.

ULC S304 REQUIREMENTS (for VISTA-15PCN and VISTA-20PCN)

Refer to the following notes for systems intended for Low Risk Level (low extent of protection) and Medium Risk Level (medium extent of protection) installations.

Low Risk Level

If the panel is used for Low Risk Level installations, the system msut include the following:

  • Subscriber control unit may use one telephone number, but it msut be programmed that
    1. it transmits over the single channel to the receiver once every 24 hour;
    2. it detects a loss of communication and initiates the local trouble signal within 180 seconds;
    3. in event of failure in the communication channel, all alarm and trouble signals must be annunciated locally.
  • Protection circuit conductors shall form one fully supervised circuit so arranged that an alarm signal will be initiated at the central station from teh effect of loss data, an open circuit or other change in normal status.
  • Trouble response time must be in compliance with CAN/ULC-S301, Central and Monitoring Station Burglar Alarm Systems

Medium Risk Level

If the panel is used for Medium Risk Level installations, the system must include the following:

  • Subscriber control unit may use at least two communication levels, one being the telephone number and the other being a radio frequency communication channel - the GSM communicator may be used. The Subscriber control unit must be programmed that
    1. it transmits over the both channels to the receiver once every 24 hours;
    2. failure of communication of either channel is reported to the Central Station on the other channel within 240 sec;
    3. the first attempt to send a status change signal shall utilize the Telephone line. Where it is known to have failed, transmission attempts over the alternate communication channel shall occur.
  • Protection circuit conductors shall form double fully supervised circuits so arranged that an alarm signal will be initiated at the central station from the effect of loss data, an open circuit or other change in normal status.
  • Trouble response time must be in compliance with CAM/ULC-S301, Central and Monitoring Station Burglar Alarm Systems

Perimeter, Space, Safe, and Vaults Protection

Protection for perimeter, space, safe, and vaults need to be provided during the installation.

  • For the Low Risk Security Level - Accessible openings should be contacted whether fixed or moveable;
  • For the Medium Risk Security Level - All moveable and fixed accessible openings should be contacted.

5800 Series Transmitter Input Loop Identification

All of the transmitters illustrated have one or more unique factory assigned input (loop) ID numbers. Each of the inputs requires its own programming zone (e.g., a 5804's four inputs require four programming zones). For information on any transmitter not shown, refer to the instructions accompanying that transmitter for details regarding loop numbers, etc.

UL NOTE: The following transmitters are not intended for use in UL installations:

  • 5802MN
  • 5802MN2
  • 5804
  • 5804BD
  • 5814
  • 5816TEMP
  • 5819
  • 5819WHS & BRS
  • 5850.

The 5827BD and 5800TM can be used in UL Listed Residential Burglar installations.


Comments


Posted By

We have learned that Version 5.8.5 of the Total Connect 2.0 Mobile App for iOS has a bug that affects WIFI thermostats. The update leaves users unable to control their WIFI thermostats with the mobile app. However, iOS users can still control their WIFI thermostats through the TC2 website.


Many users have found that upon updating to the latest version of Total Connect 2.0, they have been left unable to operate their WIFI thermostats through the app. This includes any Honeywell Lyric Round Thermostats and any WIFI thermostat that pairs with TC2 through a Total Connect Comfort, Honeywell Home or Redlink integration.

Please note that the bug only affects the iOS version of the Total Connect 2.0 Mobile App. Android users are not affected. Additionally, Z-Wave Thermostats are also unaffected. If you are currently running iOS Mobile App Version 5.8.5, then you can still use the TC2 website to control your WIFI thermostat. You should be able to access the website using the standard web browser on your iPhone or iPad.

We expect that Resideo will release an update to fix this bug in the near future. But it may take some time before this happens. Until then, Alarm Grid monitored customers should reach out to support@alarmgrid.com with any questions. Alarm Grid will provide an update when we learn that the bug has been fixed.

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Comments


Posted By

Hi DIYers! Today, we're taking a look at our best wireless recessed door contacts. These devices are great for when you want sensors that are completely hidden and not visible when the door is closed. They take a little bit of extra effort to install, but it's worth it for many users!

Honeywell 5818mnl wireless recessed door sensor and window senso

When you have a recessed contact, you actually need to drill holes into the door and its frame. The hole in the frame is larger and sized to support the main sensor. The hole in the door is smaller and designed to support the magnet. Some recessed contacts use extremely small magnets that can be mounted without drilling holes. There is also the Honeywell 5800RPS, which uses a plunger switch rather than a magnet.

The key with wireless recessed contacts is knowing which ones are compatible with your system. This depends on the wireless receiver that your system has installed. If you have a hardwired panel with no wireless receiver, then you cannot use wireless sensors. It's really no different than any other wireless sensor. You might also want to know the size of the holes you will need to drill. For your convenience, we put together a nifty table that outlines nearly all of the information you could want:

Sensor Name & Picture
Wireless Frequency
Hole Size for Sensor
Hole Size for Magnet
Notes
Honeywell 5818MNL
Honeywell 5818mnl wireless recessed door sensor and window senso
345 MHz 3/4" Diameter, 3" Deep 3/8" Diameter, 1/2" Deep Honeywell 5800 Series Sensor. Compatible with all Honeywell and 2GIG Panels and 345 MHz IQ2+
Honeywell 5800RPS
Honeywell 5800rps wireless recessed door and window plunger sens
345 MHz 3/4" Diameter, 1.25" Deep None needed! Honeywell 5800 Series Sensor. Recessed plunger switch. Needs inner 1/4" hole in center of existing hole for antenna. Compatible with all Honeywell and 2GIG Panels and 345 MHz IQ2+
2GIG DW20R
2gig dw20r wireless recessed door slash window contact
345 MHz 11/16" Diameter, 2.6" Deep 11/16" Diameter, 1/2" Deep 2GIG 345 MHz Sensor. Compatible with all 2GIG Panels, Honeywell Lyric Controller and 345 MHz IQ2+
Interlogix TX-E221
Interlogix tx e221 wireless recessed door slash window sensor
319.5 MHz 3/4" Diameter, 2.5" Deep 3/4" Diameter, 1/2" Deep Interlogix/GE Sensor. Compatible with all Interlogix/GE Systems, legacy Qolsys Systems and 319.5 MHz IQ2+
Qolsys IQ Recessed Door-S
Qolsys iq recessed door s recessed door slash window sensor for
319.5 MHz 3/4" Diameter, 2.25" Deep 3/4" Diameter, 5/8" Deep Qolsys S-Line Sensor. Compatible with all Interlogix/GE Systems, legacy Qolsys Systems and 319.5 MHz IQ2+. Encrypted when paired with Qolsys IQ2 or IQ2+.
DSC EV-DW4917

433 MHz 11/16" Diameter, 3" Deep 3/4" Diameter, 5/8" Deep Legacy DSC Sensor. Compatible with all DSC Systems and 433 MHz IQ2+. Screw mount and press fit installation options available.
DSC PG9307

915 MHz 0.75" Diameter, 2.66" Deep None needed! PowerG Sensor. Uses a 2 mm magnet that requires no hole. Uses 128-bit AES encryption. Compatible with DSC PowerSeries Neo Panels, DSC Iotega, every IQ2+.

If you're monitored with Alarm Grid, or if you're interested in monitoring, our team would be happy to help you find the best wireless recessed contact for your needs. The best way to reach us is to email support@alarmgrid.com. You may also call us at (888) 818-7728 from 9am to 8pm EST M-F. We look forward to helping you find the perfect security equipment to protect your home or business!

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Comments


Posted By

Hi DIYers! As you may know, testing your equipment is an integral part of owning an alarm system. But your testing should go beyond just making sure your sensors work properly and that your panel communicates with the central station. Testing your sirens and sounders is also important.

Honeywell 5800wave wireless siren for lynxtouch series panels

When you activate your monitoring service with Alarm Grid, there will undoubtedly be some testing involved. Our team will be checking to see if your system sends out signals successfully. This is a vital part of receiving a certificate of alarm so that you can get a discount on your homeowner's insurance. And as a DIY installer, you will be checking to make sure that all your sensors work properly. This includes things like walking through a room to see if your motion sensor notices your presence and opening and closing your doors and windows to check that your contact sensors perform correctly. But what about your sirens?

Look, we know that testing your sirens isn't the most fun. They're loud. They scare pets. They make children cry. With that in mind, it's no surprise that some users decide to disconnect their sirens during system testing. This is perfectly fine in theory. After all, your system will still be able to communicate out, and its sensors will still work properly. You might think that you can just add your sirens later after testing. However, we're here to tell you that testing your sirens and having them activate is a step that every alarm system owner should take.

But why should you test your sirens? The reason actually goes beyond the obvious answer of making sure the sounders and strobes work. It's also smart to have a good idea of exactly what your system's sirens sound like. That way if an emergency does occur, you will have a better chance of knowing immediately what is going on. Keep in mind that not all sirens are created equal. They can differ in terms of volume and pitch. By taking the time to listen to your siren, you are more likely to be ready if there ever is an emergency.

Another thing that many users don't realize is that there are usually different noises for different types of alarms. For example, an activated smoke detector will typically produce a temporal 3 sound (three consecutive tones, then a pause, repeated), while an activated carbon monoxide detector will typically produce a temporal 4 sound (four consecutive tones, plus a pause, repeated). There are also continuous tone alarms (one long, steady tone) that are commonly used for burglary and intrusion alarms. Knowing what each alarm sounds like can potentially save your life in an emergency. For example, how you respond to a break-in won't necessarily be how you respond to a fire!

At Alarm Grid, we want all our customers to be prepared when alarms occur. This includes knowing what sounds your equipment makes. If you're a monitored customer, we are happy to help you however we can. The best way to reach us is to email support@alarmgrid.com with your questions. You may also call us at (888) 818-7728 during our normal business hours of 9am to 8pm EST M-F. We look forward to helping you get the very most out of all your alarm system equipment. That includes your sirens, sounders and strobes!

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Comments


Posted By

Just last week, Resideo purchased startup company Buoy Labs. This is the first acquisition from Resideo since the company completed its spin-off from Honeywell in October of last year. The purchase of Buoy Labs should greatly assist Resideo in its technology for environmental sensors.


Buoy Labs is best known for its smart home products that allow users to track the amount of water they use and quickly identify leaks. Their lineup fits in perfectly with Resideo. The company already offers many great flood detecting sensors. These include the Honeywell 5800FLOOD and the Honeywell 5821 when used with a Honeywell 470PB Probe or Honeywell FP280 Probe. Many of our monitored customers use these sensors to receive alerts in the event of a water leak. They can then take action before serious water damage occurs. This equipment works great with the wireless panels from Resideo, including the Honeywell Lyric Controller.

We believe that this acquisition will help Resideo make fantastic strides in its offering of environmental sensors, particularly for flood sensors. Buoy Labs has an impressive portfolio of smart home water management and water leak detection products. Resideo has cited industry studies claiming that homeowner's insurance companies pay more than $9 billion in water damage claims every year. The average claim is roughly $9,000. With the purchase of Buoy Labs, we expect that Resideo will achieve great success in reducing these figures and preventing house floods. And if you still don't think flood sensors are important, think again.

Alarm Grid will certainly keep you up-to-date with the latest news regarding any new environmental or flood sensors released from Resideo. This acquisition means Resideo has some big plans in store, and we are very excited to see what the future holds. Stick with Alarm Grid as we move forward in the exciting worlds of security, property protection and home automation!

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Hi DIYers! We have spooky good news for everyone today. We are proud to announce the unveiling of the brand-new Alarm Grid SiXTH Sensor. This is the world's first ever security system sensor that activates upon detecting any paranormal or spiritual activity. It is a must-have for all users!


As you may know, there are the five "standard" senses that we use on a daily basis. These are of course sight, smell, taste, hearing and touch. But what you might not know is that there is paranormal activity lurking among us. You cannot detect such occurrences through normal means. You need a "sixth" sense to detect any paranormal, spiritual or otherworldly activity that may be cursing you and the people in your presence. That is why we created the all-new SiXTH Sensor.

We took inspiration from Honeywell's SiX Sensor Lineup in creating the Alarm Grid SiXTH Sensor. Just like the existing SiX Sensors, the SiXTH Sensor offers 128-bit AES encryption to thwart any real-life hacking attempts. We also added Advanced Spirit Stopping encryption to stop any hacking attempts initiated from the otherworld. You can count on the SiXTH Sensor to function perfectly both in our present world and the dimensions beyond our normal reach. Please be aware that you can only see the Advanced Spirit Stopping encryption through the use of various psychonautic substances that are neither sold nor endorsed by Alarm Grid. But trust us - it's there!

Now, you might be wondering how exactly the SiXTH Sensor works. Well we are happy to explain! The sensor pairs with a wireless zone on your alarm panel much like any "present world" sensor. But you will notice a few things new. You will set the Device Type as "Paranormal Detector". The Response Type should be set to "Bruce Willis". This is a brand-new Response Type designed exclusively for use with our SiXTH Sensor. You will only get this option upon setting the Device Type, so make sure to set the options accordingly. After you save your changes, your SiXTH Sensor will be ready to go!

If your SiXTH Sensor detects any paranormal or spiritual activity that should not be present in our present world, a silent spiritual alarm will be sent to your system. Within moments, the central station will get to work sending out a response. But you can't stop spirits, ghouls and curses with police officers, firefighters or emergency medical personnel. Oh no, you need something better. Instead, you can expect Bruce Willis (not that Bruce Willis) to show up at your home or business to rid the area of any paranormal activity.

Bruce Willis (not that Bruce Willis) will come equipped with sage and various incantations to cleanse the premises and protect the spirituality of yourself and those around you. While Bruce Willis (not that Bruce Willis) might appear to be in an uncomfortable or unusual state as he performs the necessary exorcism, we can assure you that this is perfectly normal. Additionally, you can expect a call from the central station to make sure that Bruce Willis (not that Bruce Willis) arrived safely and without real-life incident. Please note that Bruce Willis (not that Bruce Willis) does not come with cab fare, and you may be responsible for ensuring his departure. Alarm Grid cannot assist with this issue, and it is up to you to make the appropriate arrangements.

Alarm Grid has already tested the SiXTH Sensor with the Honeywell Lyric Controller with great success! We easily enrolled the device to the system, and we intentionally released a safe, but other-dimensional, spirit into our headquarters. We made sure to do this at night to protect the majority of our technicians and staff members. One brave soul working the late shift was around to see the SiXTH Sensor in action. Needless to say, our expectations were more than met.


The Alarm Grid SiXTH Sensor will be coming soon, sometime within your existence. We will make sure to keep you posted about any news related to the SiXTH Sensor as it becomes available. Thanks for being an Alarm Grid customer, and we hope that you have a happy April!

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