Honeywell 6160RF Posts

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Ah the Honeywell 6160 Keypad. This is perhaps the most common alarm system keypad used with the Honeywell VISTA Security Panels. It is an alphanumeric keypad that allows for deep-level programming of the system, and it allows for the backdoor method if a user gets locked out.

Honeywell 6160 alphanumeric alarm keypadWith these great features, every Honeywell VISTA System should really have at least one keypad from the Honeywell 6160-series. For the Honeywell VISTA 15P, VISTA 20P and VISTA 21iP, up to eight of these keypads can be supported, as long as appropriate power is provided. Even if you supplement your VISTA with additional keypads like the fixed English 6150 or the touchscreen Tuxedo Touch, you'll still want at least one 6160 Keypad around to perform deep-level programming functions and for using the backdoor method in case you ever get locked out.

Many users mistakenly believe that the 6160 is an actual alarm control panel. But that is not the case. The 6160 is just a keypad use for controlling the rest of the system. The actual system is most likely inside a metal container that is hidden somewhere in the building. Some users also mistake the name for the Honeywell 6160, believing that it is called the K4274V1-H M274. However, this is just the part name of the small plastic door that is used to cover the buttons. This small plastic enclosure is used across all Honeywell 6160 Keypads. Indeed, the actual name for the keypad is 6160.

In addition to the standard Honeywell 6160 Keypad, there are also two other very popular keypads that are part of this same lineup. These include the 6160V and the 6160RF. For all intents and purposes, these are the same keypads as the standard 6160, but each offers an additional feature. The V in 6160V stands for "Voice", and the keypad offers voice annunciation. This means that the keypad will speak out any zone descriptors and the current arming status for the system. Users can also use the 6160V to record and playback voice messages of up to 2.5 minutes.

As for the 6160RF, the letters RF stand for "Radio Frequency". This keypad has a built-in 345 MHz transmitter for supporting Honeywell 5800 Series Sensors. This a great keypad to add if you want to start using wireless sensors with your Honeywell VISTA System. Not only can uni-directional devices like standard security sensors, be used, the transceiver will also support bi-directional devices, like the Honeywell 5800WAVE.

If you have questions about any of the 6160 Keypads, please reach out to us! You can email us at support@alarmgrid.com or call us at (888) 818-7728 from 9am to 8pm EST M-F. We look forward to helping you with all your security needs!

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If you are just beginning the process of looking for an alarm system, answer these really simple questions, and you'll be well on your way to finding what works for you.

1) Do you want a wired or wireless alarm system?

Honeywell L5100

We highly recommend going wireless. Our two biggest selling wireless systems are the L5100 and the L3000. Both of these systems are great. The only differences between them really, is that the L5100 has a beautiful touchscreen that the L3000 does not and the L5100 can be used as a home automation controller as well as a security system.

On the wired side, our best selling units are the VISTA 21iP and the VISTA 20P. The difference between these two systems is that the 21iP has a built-in IP module, and the 20P requires that you purchase one (the 7847i) separately. After you've done your research, if you are excited about the VISTA panels, but like the benefits that a wireless system can offer you, you can add a 6160RF keypad with integrated wireless receiver to your VISTA panel and turn it into a wireless system.

2) How many doors and windows do you want to protect?

Honeywell 5811Honeywell 5816

If you need three or more door and window sensors, and you have decided that a wireless system is for you, check out our L5100PK and L3000PK. They are the most cost-efficient way to get the sensors and system you want. If you need additional sensors, you can add more 5816s or 5811s. The 5816s are thick and boxy, the 5811s are thin like a wafer. Both are good, but we a lot of users prefer the look of the 5811s.

If you want wired door and window sensors, we have tons of those. Look through our selection, and pick the ones that you like best. They all work well, and each of them perform a slightly different function.

3) How many motion sensors do you need?

Honeywell 5800PIR-RES

A lot of people do not install motion sensors. They are a good way to add an extra layer of protection, but oftentimes, the door and window sensors are good enough. If you just need one motion sensor, the kits I wrote about earlier are great. If you need more, the kit is still good, but you'll need to grab some more 5800PIR-RES motion detectors individually.

4) What kind of communication do you want your panel to use?

If you add alarm monitoring to your system, when a sensor is tripped, your security panel will send a signal somewhere. Now, if you have Total Connect service, it will go to AlarmNet and send you an email and / or a text. If you are connected to a central station, it will also go there.

How does the signal get from your panel to the central station or AlarmNet?

Good question. The signal can be delivered in three basic ways. First, you can have your system use your land line to report the alarm signals to the central station. All Honeywell systems, wireless and wired, have a built-in phone dialer so nothing additional is needed. That said, no one has a traditional phone line anymore. Also, you can't get Total Connect using a phone line. Therefore, other communication pathways are more popular. If you don't want to use the phone line, the most popular communication pathway is over the internet. While the L5100 can be hooked up through ethernet with the iLP5 module, the more common way to hook up an L5100 to the internet is by using the L5100-WIFI module. The L3000 needs the 7847i-L for internet monitoring and the VISTA panels use the similarly named, but very different 7847i. The L3000 and VISTA panels do not have a WIFI option and require an Ethernet cord to be strung to the router. The final communication pathway is over cell towers. Basically, when you purchase one of Alarm Grid's monitoring plans that include Cellular Communications, you are buying an AT&T cell phone plan for your system. We handle the SIM card activation and billing so you don't have to worry about a separate cell phone bill. Your system will then send out a signal using the wireless GSM network (which is often regarded as the most reliable pathway). The L5100 requires a GSMVLP5-4G to accomplish this, the L3000 needs a GSMVLP4G installed, and the VISTA panels need either the GSMV4G or the GSMX4G (see our FAQ on these communicators if you want to understand the difference between the two), unless it is a VISTA 21iP which requires the VISTA-GSM4G.

It may come as a surprise for anyone who is just starting their search, but those are really the four basic questions you need to ask yourself. Once you have taken inventory of your door and window sensors, motion sensor needs, whether you want your system to be wired or wireless, and what sort of communication pathway you think sounds most attractive give us a call or chat with us. We'd love to help you.


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