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Hi DIYers! We're here with another Alarm Grid Tip. We're going to cover the proper technique for mounting your door alarm sensors. Many people have trouble getting a faulted zone to disappear when their sensors are not aligned properly. Mounting your sensors correctly will fix this issue.

Honeywell 5800mini interior wireless door and window sensor

First, It's important to understand how door and window contacts work. There are two (2) parts. These are a sensor and a magnet. The sensor is the larger component and usually represents the listed product dimensions. The magnet is the smaller component. In a proper installation, the sensor (larger) should be mounted on the door frame. The magnet (smaller) should be mounted on the actual door. Ideally, the magnet and the sensor should be in direct contact when the door is closed. The magnet should also be aligned with the metal reed switch inside the sensor. The sensor will most likely have indentations to indicate the location of the reed switch.

The idea is that when the door is closed, the magnet will be in contact with the sensor. This is why these sensors are often called "contacts". When the door is opened, the magnet will become separated from the sensor. This will release its internal metal reed switch. When this happens, the sensor will transmit a signal to the alarm control panel. The system will respond based on the programming settings for the corresponding zone.

When you mount your door contacts, you should make sure that the magnet and the sensor are in proper alignment when the door is closed. If not, then the reed switch inside the sensor will stay open. As a result, the zone will still be shown as faulted on the panel. You want proper alignment so that the zone functions consistently. Whenever the door is opened, the zone should appear as faulted. If it's closed, then you should not see any faults.

Walk testing your contacts is extremely important! This is the best way to make sure that the sensor and magnet are in proper alignment. Sure, it might pass the eyeball test, but does it pass the system test? Always, always, always test your equipment! We don't care if you are a novice DIYer or a seasoned professional installer - your job is not finished until you have completed the walk test.

Again, the ideal door sensor and magnet will be IN DIRECT CONTACT when the door is closed. This will provide the best possible results. We have seen customers stack multiple pieces of double-sided foam tape to make this happen. This is pretty unusual, but it works! It might look funny if you have to do that, but it will get the job done! As long as the sensor and magnet are in correct alignment, then the sensor will work.

If you absolutely must leave the contact and magnet separated, do not do so from more than one-half (0.5) of an inch, unless the manual specifically says that the sensor-magnet gap can be further. And make sure to test extra thoroughly if you decide to try and get these sensors to work with a wider magnet spacing.

Also remember to check sensor for indentations that indicate which side to place the magnet. If you are unsure, then check the device manual. Many answers can be found in the installation instructions. Unfortunately, many end users choose to ignore them. Read the manual!

Keep in mind that some door sensors may be equipped with LED lights that help the installer make sure that the sensor and magnet are indeed in proper alignment. If your sensor has this feature, then definitely use it! This is an easy and convenient way to make sure they are aligned correctly. Check your device manual for more information. An example of a door sensor that is equipped with this feature is the Honeywell 5800MINI.

Below is an example of what a properly installed contact looks like. In this case, it is the 2GIG DW10. Note how the sensor and the magnet are in direct contact and properly aligned. Normally, the battery tab at the bottom of the sensor would be removed, but for this example, it's okay.


We hope this tip has been helpful for anyone setting up their first alarm system. Please email us at support@alarmgrid.com if you have any questions. We look forward to hearing from you!

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Honeywell is known for producing some outstanding security equipment, and their wireless door and window contacts are no exception. With wireless contacts available from both the 5800 Series lineup and the SiX Series lineup, there are certainly some great options. But with all the possibilities, it might seem overwhelming if you are just getting started. This guide will help you choose the perfect wireless Honeywell door and window contact for your needs.

Honeywell 5820l super slim wireless door and window sensorFirst, a user should understand exactly how a door and window contact works. Almost every wireless Honeywell door and window contact functions using the exact same principles. These devices consist of a sensor and magnet. The sensor is the "brains" of the operation, and it is responsible for sending signals to the alarm system. It is typically installed on or inside the door or window frame. The magnet is installed on or inside the door or window itself. The only wireless Honeywell contact that does not use a magnet is the Honeywell 5800RPS. This is a wireless recessed sensor for doors only that operates using a plunger switch.

For proper operation, the device's magnet should be installed very close to the sensor. We usually recommend placing it within a half-inch of the sensor. However, some 5800 Series contacts, like the 5816OD, can function properly with a slightly larger spacing gap. When the door or window is opened, the magnet will separate from the sensor. This will cause a reed switch inside the sensor to activate. When this happens, the sensor will send a signal to the alarm system so that the programmed Response Type can be performed.

It's also important to know the system compatibilities for the different Honeywell wireless contacts. Their wireless contacts come from two different sensor lineups. These are the 5800 Series and the SiX Series. The 5800 Series contacts are unidirectional devices that operate at 345 MHz. This makes them compatible with any Honeywell System or 2GIG System. But the SiX Series contacts are bi-directional, fully encrypted sensors that communicate using 2.4 GHz WIFI. These sensors only work with Honeywell Lyric Systems.

Honeywell lyric controller encrypted wireless security system

If you have a Honeywell Lyric Controller, then you can choose between any Honeywell wireless contact on the market. But if you have a LYNX Touch or a VISTA System with an added wireless receiver, then you are restricted to the 5800 Series contacts. Additionally, if you are using a 2GIG GC3 or a 2GIG GC2, then you can use either 2GIG Contacts or Honeywell 5800 Series contacts. Any alarm systems that do not accept the 345 MHz frequency are unable to use Honeywell contacts.

The only two contacts in the Honeywell SiX Series Lineup are the Honeywell SiXCT and the Honeywell SiXMINICT. These are both wireless, surface-mount sensors that work exclusively with Honeywell Lyric Systems. What makes these sensors special is that they feature 128-bit AES encryption. Whenever the sensor sends a command to the Lyric System, the system must then send a secure response back to the sensor. The command will only go through if this secure response is received. Many security experts refer to this as a "digital handshake", and it is excellent for preventing any hacking attempts or wireless attacks.

The SiXCT and the SiXMINICT do have a few slight differences. Most notably, the SiXMINICT is smaller and more compact than the SiXCT. The SiXCT measures at 3.13”L x 1.61”W x 1"D, while the SiXMINICT measures at 2.44”L x 1.25”W x .45”D. So users who want a smaller sensors should go with the SiXMINICT. But the benefit of the SiXCT is that it features a larger wireless range (~300 feet) than the SiXMINICT (~200 feet). However, only users with particularly large properties should have to worry about signal range. One thing that these sensors do share in common is that they can both be batch-enrolled with the Lyric Controller.

  • Honeywell SiXCT - The standard SiX Series contact. Features a 300 foot range and encryption. Will only work with Lyric Systems.
  • Honeywell SiXMINICT - The more compact SiX Series contact. Provides a 200 foot range and encryption. For Lyric Systems only.

Honeywell sixct wireless door slash window contact for lyric conHoneywell sixminict wireless door slash window contact for lyric

But the SiX Series contacts aren't for everyone. For one, they will only work with the Lyric Systems. There are also no recessed contacts in the SiX Series lineup. Users who don't have a Lyric Controller or want a recessed sensor should look to the Honeywell 5800 Series instead. This is an incredibly diverse sensor lineup that has an appropriate contact option for virtually any situation. Any Honeywell or 2GIG System will work with these sensors. This includes any Lyric Controller, L7000, L5210, VISTA P-Series, 2GIG GC3, 2GIG GC2 and more. Most 5800 Series contacts feature a 150-200 foot wireless range that can be effectively doubled with the use of a 5800RP Wireless Repeater.

Honeywell l7000 wireless home security system with 7 inch screenHoneywell 5800rp wireless repeater

When selecting a 5800 Series Sensor, a user will choose between a surface-mount contact and a recessed contact. With a surface-mount contact, the sensor and the magnet are mounted on the outer surface of the door or window and its frame. But with a recessed contact, the sensor and magnet are installed inside the door or window and its frame. Surface-mount sensors are very easy to install, since they only require screws or double-sided foam tape. But the sensor will be visible on the outside of the door. Recessed sensors are more difficult to install since holes will need to be drilled. However, some users will appreciate the fact that recessed sensors are hidden.

For users who go with a surface-mount sensor there are certainly some great options in the 5800 Series. One of our favorites is the 5800MINI. This is a reliable sensor that boasts an impressive 200 foot range, despite its small size of just 2.2"H x 1"W x 0.25"D. This is arguably the best surface-mount contact in the Honeywell 5800 Series.

  • Honeywell 5800MINI - A small and discreet surface-mount contact. Offers a 200 foot wireless range. Great for almost any application.

Honeywell 5800mini interior wireless door and window sensor

But there are other surface-mount options than just the 5800MIIN. The 5816 is the most popular sensor that Honeywell has ever offered. It features a larger size and roughly the same range as the 5800MINI. But unlike the 5800MINI, the 5816 can be used as a wireless transmitter for a normally closed hardwired device. Honeywell also offers the 5820L Slim Line for narrow installations and the 5816OD for outdoor use.

  • Honeywell 5816 - Honeywell's most popular sensor. Can also be used as a wireless transmitter for a single NC hardwired device.
  • Honeywell 5820L - A slim line door and window contact that is great for narrow applications. Features a 150-foot range.
  • Honeywell 5816OD - A surface-mount contact for outdoor installations. Excellent for monitoring fences, sheds and detached garages.

Honeywell 5816 wireless door window sensorHoneywell 5816od wireless outdoor door and window sensor top


Honeywell also offers some less popular 5800 Series contacts. These include the 5811 (discontinued), the 5814, the 5815 and the 5816MN (discontinued). While these sensors will work just fine, there isn't really any reason to choose them over another 5800 Series contact.

  • Honeywell 5811 - A small and discreet sensor that has since been discontinued. Replaced by the Honeywell 5800MINI.
  • Honeywell 5814 - Another compact sensor option. It is not as robust as the 5800MINI. Its wireless range is only about 100 feet.
  • Honeywell 5815 - An aesthetically pleasing surface-mount contact that has roughly the same functionality as the 5816.
  • Honeywell 5816MN - A discreet surface mount sensor that has been discontinued. Replaced by the Honeywell 5816MN.

Honeywell 5814 wireless small door sensor and window sensorHoneywell 5815 white wireless aesthetic door sensor and window s

There are also several great recessed contacts in the 5800 Series. The Honeywell 5818MNL is a relatively standard recessed contact that can be used with almost any door or window. It features a 200-foot range, and the installation only requires minor drilling. The Honeywell 5800Micra is a recessed contact for windows only. It is a very small sensor with an attached antenna for sending wireless signals. Finally there's the 5800RPS, which uses a plunger switch instead of a sensor and magnet. This sensor can only be used with doors. When the door is closed, the plunger switch will be pressed in. Once the door is opened, the plunger switch will come out and activate the sensor.

  • Honeywell 5818MNL - A standard recessed contact for doors and windows. It is easy to install, and it has a 200 foot range.
  • Honeywell 5800Micra - A small recessed contact for windows only. Its antenna must be adjusted carefully when installing.
  • Honeywell 5800RPS - A recessed sensor that uses a plunger switch instead of a magnet. For use with doors only.

Honeywell 5818mnl wireless recessed door sensor and window sensoHoneywell 5800micra wireless recessed window contact

Alarm Grid has previously discussed the batteries used with door sensors. We recommend checking out that blog post for more information on which batteries to use with a door and window sensor. If you ever need any additional help choosing a Honeywell door and window contact for your DIY wireless alarm system, please feel free to send an email to support@alarmgrid.com. You can also contact one of our technical specialists by calling 888-818-7728 from 9am to 8pm EST M-F.

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Door alarm sensors, or contacts, are some of the most important devices used with security systems. These devices alert a user whenever their door is opened. They can be used on virtually any type of door. These might include a front door, a back door, screen doors, a patio door, a shed, cabinets and any door inside the building. We typically find that door alarm sensors are some of the easiest to use devices with an alarm system. But still, it can be helpful to read through a comprehensive guide explaining the full ins and outs of these devices. So it here is - everything you've ever to know about door alarm sensors.

Qolsys iq dw mini s encrypted wireless sensors for iq panel 2 qsThe Basics of Door Alarm Sensors

Most traditional door sensors feature a relatively simple design and premise. These devices usually consist of a sensor and a magnet. The sensor is placed on or inside the door frame, and the magnet is placed on or inside the door itself, within a half inch of the sensor. Opening the door will cause the magnet to pull away and separate from the sensor. When this happens, a reed switch inside the sensor will activate. This will cause the sensor to send a signal to the security system, letting it know that the door was opened. The system will then perform the appropriate response based on how the sensor's Response Type was programmed. At the surface, it's all very simple. Some examples of these traditional sensors include the Honeywell 5800MINI, the Honeywell SiXMINICT and the VERSA-2GIG Sensor. Traditional door sensors can be either surface-mounted or recessed.

Honeywell 5800mini interior wireless door and window sensor

There's also a second variation of door sensors, known as mechanical door sensors. This type of sensor features a physical switch that is pressed down when the door is closed. When the door is opened, the switch will pop up, causing the sensor to activate. From there, the system will perform the Response Type assigned to the zone for that sensor. This type of door alarm sensor is far less common than the other type of sensor. However, the end result is still the same - the system will still perform the programmed Response Type when the sensor is activated. An example of this type of sensor is the Honeywell 5800RPS. While you are less likely to come across this type of door sensor, it's still worth mentioning just in case. Mechanical door sensors are only available in the recessed variety.

Honeywell 5800rps wireless recessed door and window plunger sensTypes of Door Sensors - The Two Distinctions

Now that you know the very basics of door sensors, you can start thinking about the different types. While almost every door sensors operates using one of the two mechanisms mentioned above, there are two other distinctions that are commonly made between door sensors. These are whether the door sensor is wireless or wired and whether the door sensor is surface-mounted or recessed. These considerations will play a big role in determining which door sensor you choose to purchase for your alarm system.

A wireless door sensor will communicate with an alarm system wirelessly. This will prevent the need for running a wire from the system to the door sensor. This can make wireless door sensors significantly easier to install. Another great aspect of wireless door sensors is that they can usually be auto-enrolled with the security system. That said, a wireless sensor will need to have its battery replaced every three to five years. On the other hand, a wired door sensor will need to be physically connected with the alarm system. This can make the installation considerably more difficult in certain cases. However, a wired sensor will never require any battery replacements.

If you are using a wireless door sensor with a wired alarm system, such as a Honeywell VISTA Panel, then you will need to use a wireless receiver. This will allow the wireless signal to be received by the system. When choosing a wireless door sensor, make sure that the wireless frequencies it uses are compatible with your alarm system. For example, Honeywell Panels look for wireless signals that operate at a frequency of 345 MHz, while Qolsys Panels use signals that operate at a frequency of 319.5 MHz. If you try to use a wireless door sensor that does not communicate at the correct wireless frequency, then it will not function with the alarm system.

Honeywell 5800rp wireless repeaterThe other major distinction between door sensors is surface-mount sensors versus recessed sensors. Simply put, surface-mount sensors are installed on the outside of the door and its frame, while recessed sensors are installed in the inside. Surface-mount sensors require no drilling. In the easiest scenario, it is possible to mount them using a double-sided adhesive (foam tape). They can also be mounted using screws. With their easier installation, this is generally the preferred type of door sensor. Most users do not mind the fact that a small sensor will be visible on the outside of the door.

Honeywell 5820l super slim wireless door and window sensorHowever, for users who do want a more discrete installation, there are recessed door sensors. These sensors and their magnets need to be inserted into holes that are drilled into both the door and the frame. The exact size of the holes will depend on the specific model of the recessed door sensor that is being installed. Once the sensor and magnet have been installed, they will not be visible from the outside. That said, most users opt for surface-mount door sensors due to the easier installation.

Honeywell 5818mnl wireless recessed door sensor and window senso

Some Notes on Response Types

The primary function of any security sensor is determined by its Response Type. This refers to what action the system will take when the zone is faulted (e.g. the door is opened). Below are the Response Types that are most commonly used with door sensors:

  • Entry / Exit: If the door is opened while the system is armed stay or armed away, then the system will need to be disarmed within its entry delay period. If the system is not disarmed within this time period, then an alarm event will occur. Most alarms will feature two different Entry / Exit settings. This allows two different entry delay periods to be used on the same system for different zones.
  • Perimeter: If the door is opened while the system is armed stay or armed away, then an alarm event will occur immediately.
  • Interior Follower: If the system is set to armed away, an alarm event will immediately occur if the door is opened, assuming that an entry / exit zone is not faulted first. If an entry / exit zone is faulted first, then the system must be disarmed within its entry delay period, otherwise an alarm event will occur.
  • Interior With Delay: If the system is set to armed away and the door is opened, then the system must be disarmed within its entry delay period. If the system is not disarmed within this time period, then an alarm event will occur.
  • Day / Night: If the system is disarmed and the door is opened, a trouble event will occur on the system. If the system is armed away or armed stay and the door is opened, an alarm event will immediately occur on the system.
  • 24 Hour Audible: Opening the door will immediately cause a full system siren and an alarm to be set off, regardless of what state the system is currently in. This Response Type should not be used unless the door should never be opened for any reason.
  • 24 Hour Auxiliary: Same as 24 Hour Audible, but only the panel itself will produce a siren. Any external sirens or noisemakers will not activate. This zone type is ideal for emergency medical cabinets that would only be opened in a serious medical emergency.
  • 24 Hour Silent: Same as 24 Hour Audible, but no siren or sound will be produced.
  • Fire No Verification: Opening the door will immediately cause a fire alarm to be set off, regardless of what state the system is currently in. This is the ideal Response Type for fire doors.

Certain Response Types are only available for certain Device Types. Depending upon the panel you are using, not all of these Response Types will be made available for the Device Type of "Door". A way to work around this is to set the Device Type to "Other". This will allow you to set any possible Response Type for the door sensor.

2gig dw10 wireless slim door slash window contactOther Programming Settings

Programming a door sensor has to do with more than just the Response Type and the Device Type. Below are some of the other programming settings available for a door sensor. Please note that these settings are specific for a Honeywell Lyric Controller, and different settings may be available on another type of panel.

  • Serial Number: This is how the system will specifically identify the exact door sensor that is being used.
  • Loop Number: This tells the door sensor what function it should perform. Each door sensor usually has a specific loop number that should be set for the device to function as a door sensor. Some door sensors have multiple possible functions that can be used with the device. One example is the Honeywell 5816, which can be used as both a door sensor and as a wireless transmitter depending upon the loop number that is set.
  • Zone Descriptors: These serve as the name of the door sensor. The panel will announce the zone descriptors whenever the zone for that sensor is affected.
  • Alarm Report: This tells the system whether or not it should send an outbound signal to the central monitoring station. If you turn this off, then all the sounds and sirens will still be made, but a distress signal will never be sent to the central station. An example for turning this off might be if you are monitoring a liquor cabinet to make sure your teenage doesn't get into it. You might want a very loud siren to go off so that you know if this happens. However, you obviously wouldn't want the police to show up at your house in this situation!
  • Chime: This will have the panel produce a simple chime whenever the door is opened. Many panels will allow you to toggle between different chime options for the panel. Remember, you will still need to have the local chime for the system enabled from the main settings menu.
  • Supervision: This will have the system monitor the door sensor for low battery or loss of signal. Keep this enabled to make sure that the door sensor is always in proper working order. This setting is only used with wireless door sensors.

For any programming questions related to a specific panel, please consult the programming guide for that panel. This information is readily available on the Alarm Grid website in the form of FAQs.

Honeywell 5816 wireless door window sensor

Common Door Sensor Questions

Below are some questions that are commonly asked about door sensors:

1. How do I program my door sensor?

If it is a wireless door sensor, it can most likely be auto-enrolled.This is accomplished by accessing zone programming on the system and then faulting and restoring the door sensor three times to learn it in. You can fault and restore the door sensor by separating the sensor and the magnet and then clicking them back together. From there, make any necessary programming configurations on the panel. See the above information on Response Types and other programming settings.

If it is a wired door sensor with a hardwired VISTA Panel, then we recommend consulting this FAQ. You may also need to consult the VISTA 15P and 20P Programming Guide.

Honeywell vista 15p alarm control panel

2. How long do door sensor batteries last?

A wireless door sensor will typically require a battery replacement every three to five years. Wired door sensors do not use batteries, and they will never require a battery replacement.

Panasonic cr123a 3v battery

3. How close should the door sensor be to its magnet?

We usually recommend placing the door sensor magnet within a half inch of the sensor. Some sensors may allow for a greater separation distance than others before a faulted zone will occur. The closer the magnet is to the sensor, the less likely an unwanted fault or a false alarm is to occur.

Honeywell 5899 magnet for 5816 wireless door sensor and window s

4. Are there any encrypted wireless door sensors?

Yes, there are encrypted wireless door sensors. The Honeywell SiXCT, the Honeywell SiXMINICT, the Qolsys IQ DW MINI-S and the Qolsys IQ Recessed Door-S are all encrypted wireless door sensors.

Honeywell sixct wireless door slash window contact for lyric con

5. What is the best door sensor?

Please see the following FAQs:

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If you are just beginning the process of looking for an alarm system, answer these really simple questions, and you'll be well on your way to finding what works for you.

1) Do you want a wired or wireless alarm system?

Honeywell L5100

We highly recommend going wireless. Our two biggest selling wireless systems are the L5100 and the L3000. Both of these systems are great. The only differences between them really, is that the L5100 has a beautiful touchscreen that the L3000 does not and the L5100 can be used as a home automation controller as well as a security system.

On the wired side, our best selling units are the VISTA 21iP and the VISTA 20P. The difference between these two systems is that the 21iP has a built-in IP module, and the 20P requires that you purchase one (the 7847i) separately. After you've done your research, if you are excited about the VISTA panels, but like the benefits that a wireless system can offer you, you can add a 6160RF keypad with integrated wireless receiver to your VISTA panel and turn it into a wireless system.

2) How many doors and windows do you want to protect?

Honeywell 5811Honeywell 5816

If you need three or more door and window sensors, and you have decided that a wireless system is for you, check out our L5100PK and L3000PK. They are the most cost-efficient way to get the sensors and system you want. If you need additional sensors, you can add more 5816s or 5811s. The 5816s are thick and boxy, the 5811s are thin like a wafer. Both are good, but we a lot of users prefer the look of the 5811s.

If you want wired door and window sensors, we have tons of those. Look through our selection, and pick the ones that you like best. They all work well, and each of them perform a slightly different function.

3) How many motion sensors do you need?

Honeywell 5800PIR-RES

A lot of people do not install motion sensors. They are a good way to add an extra layer of protection, but oftentimes, the door and window sensors are good enough. If you just need one motion sensor, the kits I wrote about earlier are great. If you need more, the kit is still good, but you'll need to grab some more 5800PIR-RES motion detectors individually.

4) What kind of communication do you want your panel to use?

If you add alarm monitoring to your system, when a sensor is tripped, your security panel will send a signal somewhere. Now, if you have Total Connect service, it will go to AlarmNet and send you an email and / or a text. If you are connected to a central station, it will also go there.

How does the signal get from your panel to the central station or AlarmNet?

Good question. The signal can be delivered in three basic ways. First, you can have your system use your land line to report the alarm signals to the central station. All Honeywell systems, wireless and wired, have a built-in phone dialer so nothing additional is needed. That said, no one has a traditional phone line anymore. Also, you can't get Total Connect using a phone line. Therefore, other communication pathways are more popular. If you don't want to use the phone line, the most popular communication pathway is over the internet. While the L5100 can be hooked up through ethernet with the iLP5 module, the more common way to hook up an L5100 to the internet is by using the L5100-WIFI module. The L3000 needs the 7847i-L for internet monitoring and the VISTA panels use the similarly named, but very different 7847i. The L3000 and VISTA panels do not have a WIFI option and require an Ethernet cord to be strung to the router. The final communication pathway is over cell towers. Basically, when you purchase one of Alarm Grid's monitoring plans that include Cellular Communications, you are buying an AT&T cell phone plan for your system. We handle the SIM card activation and billing so you don't have to worry about a separate cell phone bill. Your system will then send out a signal using the wireless GSM network (which is often regarded as the most reliable pathway). The L5100 requires a GSMVLP5-4G to accomplish this, the L3000 needs a GSMVLP4G installed, and the VISTA panels need either the GSMV4G or the GSMX4G (see our FAQ on these communicators if you want to understand the difference between the two), unless it is a VISTA 21iP which requires the VISTA-GSM4G.

It may come as a surprise for anyone who is just starting their search, but those are really the four basic questions you need to ask yourself. Once you have taken inventory of your door and window sensors, motion sensor needs, whether you want your system to be wired or wireless, and what sort of communication pathway you think sounds most attractive give us a call or chat with us. We'd love to help you.


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Since we opened for business, we've had a number of requests from wholesalers, distributors, and installers who want to purchase product at a deep discount. Usually it's an enormous amount of product that someone wants at a fraction of the price everyone else pays.

We made a decision very early on not to do business with wholesalers, distributors and installers. We really are only interested in selling to end users. One look at our alarm monitoring page reveals our goal, I think. It's clean, simple to understand, and we are up front about our pricing

Our goal has been to create a brand that helps guide individuals through the process of purchasing and installing a new alarm system and then offer them the exact kind of home security monitoring that they need. We really aren't the negotiating type of company. The price you pay on our site is the same price that every single person pays.

We really are a very small team. When we get distracted trying to give wholesalers, distributors and installers price quotes, it deters from our ability to build the brand that we want to build (and that we think you want us to build).

So if you're a wholesaler, distributor or installer please don't bother contacting us for quotes on big orders. You can do the math yourself. If you want 100 5808W3s, you will pay 100 * $77.99, just like everyone else.

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