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Hi DIYers! Last week was interesting for us, as we scrambled to get up some new content by the end of the week. We managed to upload seven new videos. This includes five from Joe, who was this week's MVP. We hope that you enjoy our latest videos and how they help you use your equipment.

Viewing an ADC-SVR122 Remotely

Joe explains how users can view video footage stored on an Alarm.com ADC-SVR122 Stream Video Recorder remotely. The ADC-SVR122 stores footage so that it can be viewed on Alarm.com. The footage can be viewed from Alarm.com, both through the website and through the mobile app. The ADC-SVR122 will need to be integrated with the user's Alarm.com account for this to work. The integration must be done from the Alarm.com website by choosing the option "Add Video Device". Up to eight (8) Alarm.com Cameras can be used with a single ADC-SVR122.


Excluding a Kwikset Z-Wave Lock

Joe teaches users how to exclude a Kwikset Z-Wave Lock from a Z-Wave network. There are a few different instances when you may want to exclude a Z-Wave lock. This step is important to perform before trying to the device to the network. Even if the lock is brand-new, it may have been previously paired with a network for factory testing purposes. You might also try excluding a lock and then re-adding it to the network as a possible troubleshooting step.


Factory Defaulting a Kwikset Z-Wave Lock

Joe demonstrates how to factory default a Kwikset Z-Wave Lock. Performing a factory reset is normally performed when a user inherits the lock from someone else and they want to start fresh with factory default settings. A user may also perform a factory default as a last ditch method for troubleshooting the device. Performing a factory default will clear all programmed user codes and remove all Z-Wave settings. The lock will need to be re-enrolled after performing the default.


Including a Kwikset Z-Wave Lock

Joe covers the process for including a Kwikset Z-Wave Lock into a Z-Wave network. This requires a Z-Wave controller or hub. By pairing a Z-Wave lock, you will be able to control it remotely from an interactive service platform on your smartphone. This is great if you ever need to let someone inside your home while they are away. You can then remotely lock the device after they leave. Z-Wave devices can also be set to activate based on a schedule or with certain predetermined events.


Glass Break Simulators

Joe talks about glass break simulators and how they are used. These devices will produce a sound that is specifically designed to activate glass break detectors. This is great for testing glass break sensors and making sure that they are detecting sounds and working properly. Most security equipment manufacturers have their own glass break simulators that they recommend for use with their equipment. Alarm Grid offers three (3) glass break simulators, which are the Honeywell FG701, the DSC AFT-100 and the Interlogix 5709C-W.


Carbon Monoxide Sensor Notifications from a Lyric via Apple HomeKit

Jorge discusses why a user will not receive specific carbon monoxide sensor notifications from Apple HomeKit when the CO sensor is used with their Lyric Alarm System. When HomeKit is used with the Lyric System, HomeKit will only provide specific notifications for burglary and intrusion zones. HomeKit will not provide specific alerts for life-safety zones. Instead, the user will only receive a General Lyric System Alert. That is why it is important to use Total Connect 2.0 alongside HomeKit. Unlike Apple HomeKit, Total Connect 2.0 will let you know exactly which zone was faulted, regardless of Response Type.


Programming Options Accessible Via Installer Code on the Lyric Alarm

In his triumphant return, Jarrett explains the programming options that can be accessed from the Installer Tools Menu on the Honeywell Lyric Controller. This menu is accessed using the system's Installer Code, which should be kept at its default of 4112. The Installer Tools Menu offers many options that allow the user to make changes to the system settings. This includes adding new sensors and configuring the communication path settings for the panel. You can also access Installer Tools to perform a factory default or to reset the Master Code to 1234.

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Hi DIYers! We haven't made an Alarm Grid Tips post in while, so we figured now was a good time. The tip for today is to always take pictures when swapping out a hardwired alarm control panel with a new one. A few clear and detailed pictures can help you greatly with rewiring later on.

Honeywell vista 20p wired alarm control panel

If you have an older alarm system, there may be many benefits to upgrading to a newer model. A more advanced panel will allow for a greater number of zones and support for new functions and features. Many people upgrade so that they can access an interactive service platform like Total Connect 2.0 or Alarm.com. This will allow you to control your system and check its status remotely using a smartphone.

When a person makes a system upgrade, they will usually want to bring their existing sensors to their new setup if possible. Even if the panel itself is old and outdated, the sensors may still be perfectly suitable for regular use. It can be very expensive to buy a complete new set of sensors. And the user won't even need to move their sensors. They can remain in the same location and just wire-in with the new panel.

Honeywell 943wg mini magnetic contact

But if you have a complete hardwired system, then there are likely many sensors and other pieces of equipment running from various locations on the circuit board. Certain devices like sirens can require a surprisingly intricate setup, and it can be difficult to remember where everything goes. Even if you are just transferring sensors and other devices from one panel to another, the task can be surprisingly challenging without a visual aid.

For that reason, we recommend taking pictures before trying to bring over equipment from one panel to another. You don't need to take many, just enough to see where everything goes and where every connection ends up. In many cases, a new panel will follow a very similar wiring setup to the one it is replacing. By using your images as a guide, you will have a much easier time making a successful transition.

This same principle also applies if you are upgrading to a wireless system from a hardwired system. Wireless systems can support hardwired sensors by using wired to wireless converters. A wired to wireless converter works by connecting directly with hardwired sensors and sending out wireless signals to the panel on their behalf. The system will then recognize these wired sensors just like any regular wireless sensor.

Honeywell 5800c2w hardwire to wireless system 9 zone conversion moduleWiring sensors to a converter is actually very similar to wiring to a panel. The pictures of your old hardwired setup will be surprisingly helpful when connecting to a wired to wireless converter. You can check the pictures to see which wire goes to which terminal and even make sure the backup power supply is connected correctly. By placing the converter in the old location of the previous panel, all the sensors can remain in the same spot and easily connect with the converter(s).

So if you are ever upgrading from an older hardwired system, make sure to take some pictures first! We hope this basic tip was helpful to some DIY installers out there. Keep checking our blog for more Alarm Grid Tips in the future.

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Hi DIYers! As you may know, testing your equipment is an integral part of owning an alarm system. But your testing should go beyond just making sure your sensors work properly and that your panel communicates with the central station. Testing your sirens and sounders is also important.

Honeywell 5800wave wireless siren for lynxtouch series panels

When you activate your monitoring service with Alarm Grid, there will undoubtedly be some testing involved. Our team will be checking to see if your system sends out signals successfully. This is a vital part of receiving a certificate of alarm so that you can get a discount on your homeowner's insurance. And as a DIY installer, you will be checking to make sure that all your sensors work properly. This includes things like walking through a room to see if your motion sensor notices your presence and opening and closing your doors and windows to check that your contact sensors perform correctly. But what about your sirens?

Look, we know that testing your sirens isn't the most fun. They're loud. They scare pets. They make children cry. With that in mind, it's no surprise that some users decide to disconnect their sirens during system testing. This is perfectly fine in theory. After all, your system will still be able to communicate out, and its sensors will still work properly. You might think that you can just add your sirens later after testing. However, we're here to tell you that testing your sirens and having them activate is a step that every alarm system owner should take.

But why should you test your sirens? The reason actually goes beyond the obvious answer of making sure the sounders and strobes work. It's also smart to have a good idea of exactly what your system's sirens sound like. That way if an emergency does occur, you will have a better chance of knowing immediately what is going on. Keep in mind that not all sirens are created equal. They can differ in terms of volume and pitch. By taking the time to listen to your siren, you are more likely to be ready if there ever is an emergency.

Another thing that many users don't realize is that there are usually different noises for different types of alarms. For example, an activated smoke detector will typically produce a temporal 3 sound (three consecutive tones, then a pause, repeated), while an activated carbon monoxide detector will typically produce a temporal 4 sound (four consecutive tones, plus a pause, repeated). There are also continuous tone alarms (one long, steady tone) that are commonly used for burglary and intrusion alarms. Knowing what each alarm sounds like can potentially save your life in an emergency. For example, how you respond to a break-in won't necessarily be how you respond to a fire!

At Alarm Grid, we want all our customers to be prepared when alarms occur. This includes knowing what sounds your equipment makes. If you're a monitored customer, we are happy to help you however we can. The best way to reach us is to email support@alarmgrid.com with your questions. You may also call us at (888) 818-7728 during our normal business hours of 9am to 8pm EST M-F. We look forward to helping you get the very most out of all your alarm system equipment. That includes your sirens, sounders and strobes!

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Hi DIYers! Our video team was super productive over the past week, as they put up nine new videos for us all to enjoy. Jorge, Jarrett and Joe are all back and ready to help you get the most out of your system. Let's take a look at the latest content from the Alarm Grid video team.

Adding Additional User Codes to a Qolsys IQ Panel 2

Jarrett teaches users how to add additional codes to the IQ Panel 2. User codes can be assigned as a "Master", "User" or "Guest. A Master User can change system settings in addition to arming and disarming. Despite the name difference, there is actually no difference between "User" codes and "Guest" codes, as they have the same authority level. Any new system code that is added will be available on Alarm.com for further control and configuration.


Disabling Chime on a Qolsys IQ Panel 2

Jarret demonstrates how to disable the Chime function for the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 System. Normally if a zone has Chime enabled, then the panel will produce a brief Chime tone when the associated sensor is activated. However, you can disable Chimes for the entire system so that no faulted zones result in a Chime. You can also configure the Chime settings individually for each zone so that some sensors result in a chime, while others do not.


Muting the Honeywell 5828V Wireless Keypad

Jorge explains how users can mute the voice annunciation function for the Honeywell 5828V Keypad. By muting the keypad, no voice annunciations will be produced when zones are faulted. It will also not announce any changes in the current Arming state. However, this will not affect voice annunciation for the panel itself if it has the feature enabled. Additionally, muting the keypad will not stop the device from producing tones when buttons are pressed. It only affects spoken voice.


Controlling the Volume in a Honeywell 5828

Jorge demonstrates how users can adjust the volume on a Honeywell 5828. This will affect the tones produced when keypad buttons are pressed. Unlike the the Honeywell 5828V, the standard Honeywell 5828 is relatively basic it terms of volume control. The volume can only be adjusted one level at a time, and it cannot be muted entirely. The keypad can be used with any LYNX Touch Panel and any Honeywell VISTA Panel that has an added wireless transceiver.


Updating the Firmware on a Qolsys IQ Panel 2

Jarrett covers the process for updating the system firmware on a Qolsys IQ Panel 2. Performing a firmware update is often necessary for unlocking newly released system functions and capabilities. The IQ Panel 2 System will need to be connected with a local WIFI network and be running on transformer power for the update to go through. It also cannot have a low-battery condition. You can search the network for an update or apply a Patch Tag.


Basics of Alarm Keypad Operation

Jorge teaches users the basics of how to use an alarm system keypad. The main purpose of a keypad is to provide an on-site access point for controlling an alarm system. This includes Arming and Disarming. A keypad can be either a primary controller or a secondary access point depending on the system. A primary controller is used performing deep-level programming changes. If you use a keypad as a primary controller, you should make sure it is an Alphanumeric Keypad. A Fixed-English keypad cannot be used for deep-level programming.


Installing the Qolsys IQ Card-IS to the Qolsys IQ Panel 2

Joe shows users how to install the Qolsys IQ Card-IS inside the IQ Panel 2 System. The IQ Card-IS module allows you to use Qolsys Image Sensors with the system. These devices use PIR technology to detect motion. If motion is detected, the image sensor will take a photo and send it to Alarm.com. Since the IQ Card-IS uses the same antenna as the PowerG daughtercard used with the IQ Panel 2 Plus, it is only recommended to be used with the standard version of the system.


Resetting a Honeywell Tuxedo Keypad

Joe explains the different methods for resetting a Honeywell Tuxedo Touch Keypad. There are four reset options that can be performed. A Keypad Reboot Reset will simply power cycle the device. A Keypad Factory Reset will restore all settings and configurations to default, without clearing Z-Wave devices. But the Z-Wave devices will have their names reset. A Z-Wave Reboot Reset will power cycle the Z-Wave controller, without clearing devices. A Z-Wave Factory Reset will default all Z-Wave setting and clear all Z-Wave devices.


Qolsys Hardwire 16-F Overview

Joe goes through and explains how the Qolsys Hardwire 16-F functions. This is a wired to wireless converter that can support 2-wire smoke detectors on its 16th zone. It is primarily used for allowing wired sensors to communicate with wireless panels. The module works with nearly any system that accepts the 319.5 MHz frequency. Each zone terminal on the Hardwire 16-F must have a 4.7k end of line resistor, even if the zone is not used. Additionally, you must properly configure a zone as NC or NO before enrolling with the panel.

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Hi DIYers! Today, we're presenting another basic security tip. This tip is to never Arm or Disarm your system using your Installer Code. That system code should only be used for programming, and it should be kept at its default to prevent you from being locked out of programming later.

Honeywell lyric controller encrypted wireless security system

If you go to Arm your system, you will often be prompted to enter a system code. Normally, you will use your Master Code or a standard user code to complete the Arming process. However, you will notice that your can technically Arm using your system's Installer Code. By doing this, you will make it possible for you to Disarm using that same code later on. But if you use your Master Code or a user code to arm, then you will not be able to disarm using your Installer Code.

The problem with using your Installer Code to Arm and Disarm is that an intruder may know the code and use it to gain access to the system. Default Installer Codes are usually common knowledge, and an intruder will often try one of these codes in a quick attempt to disarm. While keeping the Installer Code at its default is good practice, you will never want to use this code on a regular basis. Instead, you should only use the Installer Code to enter programming when the system is already Disarmed.

The default Installer Codes for many popular security systems are as follows:

If you are using one of these codes to Arm and Disarm your system, then you should stop this practice immediately. Instead, you should use your system's Master Code to arm and disarm. Make sure you change the Master Code from its default before using it to control your system. Set it to a unique code that is difficult for others to guess, but easy for you to remember. Then use that unique and personalized code to Arm and Disarm when needed. If you need to create any additional system codes, make sure they are not obvious for an intruder to guess. You can Arm and Disarm using a standard user code just like you would a Master Code.

If you are an Alarm Grid customer with questions about system codes, please reach out to us. We want to make sure you are using a secure code to Arm and Disarm your system and that you are not putting yourself at-risk for a security breach. Please email us at support@alarmgrid.com, or call us at (888) 818-7728 during our normal business hours of 9am to 8pm EST M-F. We look forward to hearing from you.

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Hi DIYers! Our team is back with another video recap. We have six new videos this week, as it was a dead even split between Joe, Jarrett and Jorge. Each of our talented actors had two new videos apiece. Let's take a look at the latest videos from the Alarm Grid Video Production Team!

Factory Resetting the Honeywell Lynx Touch L7000

Jarrett puts on a smile as he shows users how to perform a factory reset on a Honeywell L7000 System. This is accomplished by loading one of the Default Configurations. By performing a factory reset, the entire L7000 System will need to be reprogrammed from scratch. All sensors will need to be relearned with the panel, and all system settings will be reset to their default. Additionally, the Master Code will be reset to its default of 1234, and the Installer Code will be reset to its default of 4112.


Bypassing a Sensor in Total Connect

Jarrett happily demonstrates how to bypass zones in Total Connect 2.0. When you bypass a zone, the associated sensor will remain inactive and be unable to cause a system alarm. For example, if you bypass a door sensor when arming your system, then people will be able to open and close that door without causing an alarm. However, all other system zones will still remain active as usual. Sensors must be bypassed individually for each Arming session.


Addressing a Honeywell Alarm Keypad

Joe explains how to address a Honeywell Alarm Keypad with a Honeywell VISTA Security System. Touch-button keypads use addresses 16 thru 23 on VISTA P-Series Panels. Address 16 is always enabled, while addresses 17 thru 23 must be specifically enabled within programming. Meanwhile, an Advanced User Interface (AUI) device will use address 1, 2, 5 or 6. Touchscreen keypads are considered AUI devices and will use one of these slots. Remember that the Total Connect 2.0 platform itself takes up an AUI slot.


Using the Lynx Touch with a 3rd Party Z-Wave Controller

Joe talks about how how you can use a Honeywell LYNX Touch System as a secondary Z-Wave controller. This is done by pairing the system itself with a different Z-Wave hub. All Z-Wave devices from the primary hub will be automatically pushed over the LYNX Touch System. They can then be controlled from both the primary controller and from the LYNX Touch. However, you will need to use the primary controller to learn-in new Z-Wave devices. You must install an L5100-ZWAVE Card in the LYNX Touch System to support any Z-Wave functionality.


IP Fault Time Setting on the Lyric Alarm Panel

Jorge with his colorful hair discusses the IP Fault Time Setting on the Honeywell Lyric Controller. This setting will have the system display a trouble condition whenever the WIFI goes down for a certain period of time. That way, the user will know later that the system was unable to communicate with the AlarmNet Servers. An IP Fault Time trouble will only appear on the panel if WiFI is set as the only communication path. If the system has a cellular backup, then only the central station will receive an E350 Communication Path Failure on Zone 951.


Programming a Honeywell 5800CO Into an All-in-One Panel

Jorge walks users through the process of programming a Honeywell 5800CO with a wireless alarm system. The Honeywell 5800CO is a carbon monoxide detector that operates at 345 MHz. It is primarily used with Honeywell Systems, but it will work with nearly any panel that accepts the 345 MHz frequency. The sensor will cause an instant system alarm when activated. All building occupants should vacate the premises immediately if a CO alarm occurs. When programmed as a 24-Hour Carbon Monoxide Zone, the 5800CO Sensor cannot be bypassed.

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Hi DIYers! Today, we're going to discuss the three main Arming modes used with alarm systems and explain how exactly they work. The three modes to discuss are Arm Away, Arm Stay and Arm Night. The key is knowing which Zone Types are active in each Arming mode and which ones are bypassed.

Honeywell lyric controller encrypted wireless security system

For the purpose of this post, we will be providing information specific to Honeywell Alarm Systems. However, this information can be applied across virtually any alarm control panel with the relevant Arming modes. Each mode has a specific application and time when it is most appropriate. Also remember that 24-Hour Zones (burg, fire, CO, auxiliary, audible, silent) will remain active at all times and can always cause an alarm, even when the system is disarmed. With that in mind, let's get started!

Arm Away

  • Use when you leave your home.
  • Perimeter Zones and Day/Night Zones will cause immediate alarms, including during the Exit Delay countdown.
  • User must disarm within the set Entry/Delay Period after activating an Entry/Exit Zone or an Interior w/ Delay Zone, or else an alarm will occur.
  • If an Interior Follower Zone is activated, then an immediate alarm will occur, unless it was activated after an Entry/Exit Zone.
  • If Auto-Stay Arming is enabled, then an Entry/Exit Zone must be activated when Arming Away, or else the system will revert to Arm Stay mode after the countdown.
  • The system will continuously beep during the Exit Delay countdown when Arming Away, unless a Silent Exit is performed.

Arm Stay

  • Use when someone is in the building, but you want the system to remain in an Armed state.
  • Interior Follower Zones and Interior w/ Delay Zones are automatically bypassed and cannot cause an alarm.
  • Perimeter Zones and Day/Night Zones will cause immediate alarms, including during the Exit Delay countdown.
  • If an Entry/Exit Zone is activated, the user must Disarm within a set Entry Delay period, or else an immediate alarm will occur.
  • The system will not continuously beep during the Exit Delay countdown when Arming Stay.

Arm Night

  • Essentially a more-secure version of Arm Stay Mode.
  • Set an Interior Zone to not be bypassed by enabling the Arm Night option for that zone within Zone Programming.
  • Interior Zones without Arm Night enabled will be bypassed.
  • Set Arm Night by choosing Arm Stay and then highlight the option for Arm Night on the code entry screen.
  • Arm Night option is only available if you have at least one Interior Zone with the Arm Night option enabled.


Disarmed

  • Mode when the system is not in a secured state.
  • Most security zones can be activated without causing an alarm.
  • The system will still display faulted zones, chime and read out Zone Descriptors if enabled.
  • If a Day/Night Zone is activated, then a trouble condition will occur.
  • If a 24-Hour Zone is activated, a system alarm will still occur.
  • The 24-Hour Zone category includes most Life-Safety Sensors, such as smoke detectors and carbon monoxide detectors, as well as police and medical panic buttons.

If you're an Alarm Grid monitored customer and you have any questions about your system's arming functions, please reach out to us. You may email support@alarmgrid.com or call us during our normal business hours of 9am to 8pm EST M-F at (888) 818-7728. And if you aren't already signed-up, then you can click the link in the upper-left corner of the page to get started. We look forward to working with you.

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Hi DIYers! Today, we're taking a closer look at the Qolsys IQ Siren. Specifically, we want to go into the details of how it is used when paired with a Honeywell Alarm System. As you may know, the IQ Siren is a Z-Wave device that pairs with most Z-Wave controllers, including Honeywell Panels.

Qolsys iq siren z wave siren for qolsys iq and iq panel 2 qz2300

What's interesting is that the Qolsys IQ Siren learns-in with Honeywell Alarm Systems not as a Z-Wave siren, but as a Z-Wave light switch. This is not the case with the Qolsys IQ Panel 2, which immediately recognizes the IQ Siren for what it is - a siren. This way, the siren automatically activates during audible alarm events, with no special automation functions required. The 2GIG GC2 and 2GIG GC3 Alarm Systems also properly recognize the IQ Siren as a siren. We even wrote an FAQ and shot a video about this.

But since Honeywell Systems view the Qolsys IQ Siren as a light switch and not a siren, things become a little bit tricky. After all, you want the siren to operate like a siren, not a light switch! Fortunately, there's a way around this problem. That is using Total Connect 2.0 to create smart scenes. These scenes will tell the siren to activate when the Honeywell System experiences an audible alarm event, and also to stop sounding when the system is disarmed and the alarm is cleared. How's that for a creative solution?

It might take a little bit of extra work to get the Qolsys IQ Siren working on a Honeywell Security Panel, but it really is worth it. This is a 105 dB siren with a built-in strobe light to provide a visual indication of an alarm. For a sound comparison, 105 dB is about as loud as a table saw. It blows the 85 dB sounder built into the Lyric and LYNX Touch Systems out of the water. It's much easier to install than a hardwired siren, and it is extremely versatile overall. This makes the IQ Siren a winning option for many DIY users.

The Qolsys IQ Siren is great for any Honeywell System with a Z-Wave controller. Remember, the Lyric already includes a built-in Z-Wave controller, while the other panels need to have one added separately. The LYNX Touch Systems need a Honeywell L5100-ZWAVE Card, while the VISTA Panels need either a Honeywell VAM or a Honeywell Tuxedo Touch Keypad. It is also helpful to have access to Total Connect 2.0. If your monitoring plan does not include TC2, now is a great time to get started!

Please note that while you can create the necessary scenes from the panel and not from TC2 (with the exception of the Lyric system) we find that using TC2 is the easiest option. You can use the TC2 website or the mobile app on Android and iOS devices. We like using the website to create scenes. But if you prefer the mobile app, that's okay too!


Once you have paired the IQ Siren and logged into your TC2 account, it's time to create the scenes! Most users will want three scenes. These are:

  • A scene to activate the siren during a burglary alarm
  • A scene to activate the siren during a fire alarm
  • A scene to deactivate the siren during a panel disarm

For our example, we will be creating a scene for the fire alarm. The other scenes will follow a similar process. Start by navigating to the Scenes Menu. Then choose Add Scene. You will then name your scene:


Then you will include the IQ Siren into the scene. It will be listed under "Others". Since we are setting it to activate during an alarm, we will set the device to On for this scene. But if you wanted to have the siren stop sounding when an alarm is cleared, then it would be set to Off.


Next, you will set when the scene should run. Since it is being controlled by either a system alarm or a system disarm, you will choose "Triggered by another device". Then choose the appropriate function.



Finally, save your scene!


And that's it! Remember, you must do this for each individual scenario (burglary alarm, fire alarm, and to turn off upon disarm) if you want the IQ Siren to provide complete functionality. Alarm Grid monitored customers can always get further assistance by emailing support@alarmgrid.com. You can also call us at (888) 818-7728 during our normal business hours of 9am to 8pm EST M-F. If you aren't already monitored with Alarm Grid, make sure to press the orange Alarm Monitoring button at the top of this page. We look forward to working with you!

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Hi DIYers! Welcome to the first edition of Alarm Grid Tips! This is where we teach you basic principles about alarm systems. Most of these tips will be designed for beginners, so anyone can follow along! Today, we're going to show you why you should run a wire through the back of a panel.

Honeywell l5200 lynx touch wireless home security system and alarm control panel

One of the first things you will do when setting up an alarm system is power it on. This involves connecting a 2-conductor wire to the appropriate power terminals on the back of the panel. This is something you must do whether you are mounting the panel to the wall or using a desk mount to avoid drilling holes. The panel will ultimately receive its primary power from a plug-in transformer.

If you have a wireless system, you will want to run the unconnected power wire through the back plate before connecting it to the panel. This way, you can properly close the panel. If you try to connect the wire first, you will feel pretty silly when you have to disconnect the wire and then redo the same connections!

You can see this example below with a Honeywell L5200 System. First, let's see what happens if you don't run the wire through the back plate:



Now let's try again with the system wired correctly:



The principle is the same if you have a hardwired panel. These systems are normally housed inside a metal enclosure. You will want to run any connecting wires through one of the openings on the side or in the back. This way, you can properly close the metal cabinet door. You can see this on our Honeywell VISTA 21iP System below. Note that we removed the door for easy access, but we would be able to close it if it were still attached!


Also remember that you must follow proper polarity if your system is running DC power. The black wire will connect to the negative (-) terminals on the transformer and the panel. The red wire will connect to the positive (+) terminals on the transformer and the panel. If you are using AC power, then either wire can go to either terminal. Make sure you know whether your system uses AC or DC power before wiring!

Below is an example of DC transformer where proper polarity is followed:


That concludes today's Alarm Grid tip! Keep an eye on our blog for more tips in the future. We will also let you know if there's any important new security news. If you're an Alarm Grid customer in need of assistance, or if you are interested in an alarm monitoring plan, please reach out to us by emailing support@alarmgrid.com. You may also call us at (888) 818-7728 during our normal business hours of 9am to 8pm EST M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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Hi DIYers! We're back with another video recap today, this time covering March 4th thru 7th. We have seven new videos this time, so it really was a busy week. Our team loves making these videos and helping users learn how to use their security systems. Let's check out the new videos!

Adding a Qolsys Image Sensor to the Qolsys IQ Panel 2

Joe shows users how to pair a Qolsys Image Sensor to a Qolsys IQ Panel 2 System. The Qolsys Image Sensor is basically a motion sensor with a built-in camera. When it detects motion, the camera will take a picture and send it to Alarm.com. The end user can receive a notification from Alarm.com via text or email whenever an image comes through. They can then check the image to see if there is suspicious activity. The image sensor has a detection range of 30 feet.


Programming the 5800RP to an Alarm Panel

Joe demonstrates how to pair the Honeywell 5800RP Wireless Repeater with a Honeywell Alarm Panel. The 5800RP takes the signal from a Honeywell 5800 Series device and sends it out a second time. This effectively doubles its range. The module is technically a plug and play device, and you don't need to program it to a panel for it to repeat signals. But enrolling it is necessary if you want to receive alerts for RF supervision, low-battery and AC power loss.


Silencing the Exit Delay on a Honeywell Lyric System

Jorge the "Blue-Haired Bandit" explains how you can silence the Exit Delay on a Honeywell Lyric Alarm System. Whenever a user sets their Lyric to Arm Away, there will be continuous beeping during the Exit Delay countdown. A user can silence this countdown by selecting the Silent Exit button on the code entry screen. This option will also be available if a user selects Arm Custom. The Exit Delay period will be doubled whenever the countdown is silenced.


Using 2GIG Sensors With a Lyric System

Jorge explains how it is possible to use 2GIG 345 MHz Sensors with a Honeywell Lyric Security Panel. The Lyric System must be running firmware update MR3 or higher to support these sensors. The 2GIG Sensors operate on the same 345 MHz frequency as the Honeywell 5800 Series Sensors, only on a different channel. The Lyric can also support the Honeywell SiX Series Sensors, which utilize 128-bit AES encryption for added security. The SiX Sensors were designed exclusively for the Lyric.


Adding a Z-Wave Device to the Qolsys IQ Panel 2

Super-duper Alarm Grid Team Member Jarrett bounces into action by showing users how to pair a Z-Wave Smart Home device with the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 System. Once a Z-Wave device has been paired with an IQ Panel 2, a user will be able to control it directly from the panel and remotely from Alarm.com. Before trying to pair a Z-Wave device you should always clear it from the network first. It may have been paired with a different network for factory testing purposes.


Pairing the Qolsys IQ Remote With a Qolsys IQ Panel 2

Jorge goes through the process of pairing a Qolsys IQ Remote Keypad with a Qolsys IQ Panel 2 System. The IQ Remote provides a secondary on-site access point for an IQ Panel 2 System. It is great for users with larger properties who may want to control their system from multiple locations. The IQ Remote allows for all basic functions, including arming, disarming, bypassing sensors and controlling smart home devices. However, programming must still be completed from the main system.


Enrolling a Schlage Z-Wave Lock to a Qolsys IQ Panel 2

Jorge walks users through the steps for pairing a Schlage Z-Wave Lock with a Qolsys IQ Panel 2 System. The IQ Panel 2 includes a built-in Z-Wave controller for supporting Z-Wave devices. This includes most Z-Wave locks. Once the lock is paired, you can lock and unlock the door from both the panel and from Alarm.com. By using Alarm.com, the user can push user codes from the IQ Panel 2 to the Schlage Z-Wave Lock. This way, they can disarm their system and unlock their door by simply entering a valid panel user code into the lock.

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