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Hi DIYers! We have received news that Qolsys has made the latest firmware version for the IQ Panel 2 available through downloader rather than having to apply a patch tag. The company has also refined the facial recognition feature on the IQ Panel 2 to work more effectively than before.

Qolsys iq panel 2 at and t wireless security system with at and

As you may remember, we talked about the facial recognition feature last month. We found that it worked fairly well at the time, but we're happy to hear that Qolsys has been continuing to improve the feature. Users should now find that the panel camera now recognizes suspicious faces more accurately. Once a user has properly calibrated the feature, they can receive alerts regarding any suspicious activity via text and/or email. We recommend reading our previous blog for more information about the feature and how to get started.

If you haven't already updated your IQ Panel 2 System, now is a great time to do so. Start from the main screen of the panel. Then press the small grey bar at the top. Choose Settings, followed by Advanced Settings. Then provide the system's Installer Code, which is 1111 by default. Select Upgrade Software, and then Upgrade Using Network. Then complete the on-screen instructions to perform the upgrade. Please note, your IQ Panel 2 System must be connected with a local WIFI network for the upgrade to go through successfully.

Remember, you need at least 10 saved faces before the facial recognition feature goes into effect. And the more faces you have, the more accurate the software will be. We recommend the strategy of repeatedly arming and disarming to continuously take photos until you have enough images. The images you take might not appear on Alarm.com right away. You may need to logout and then log back in before the images will appear. But if you're like us, you will soon have a surplus of images!

Then we had a different person disarm using that same code. Sure enough, we received a notification in our email!. The IQ Panel 2 was able to distinguish between the approved saved images and the different individual.


Remember, you must enable the feature in two different areas on Alarm.com. You must provide contact information in the Users tab and configure the feature:


And you must set the same recipient in Unexpected Activity within the Notifications tab:


We hope that you will enjoy using this new feature on your IQ Panel 2. Remember, you need a monitoring plan if you want to use this feature and Alarm.com. You can sign-up for monitoring by clicking the orange Alarm Monitoring button in the upper-left corner of this page. Please email support@alarmgrid.com if you have any questions.

Note: Due to privacy concerns, this feature is currently available for users in the 50 US States. We are hopeful that this feature will be made available to users in Puerto Rico and Canada in the future.

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Hi DIYers! Today, we're taking a closer look at the Qolsys IQ Siren. Specifically, we want to go into the details of how it is used when paired with a Honeywell Alarm System. As you may know, the IQ Siren is a Z-Wave device that pairs with most Z-Wave controllers, including Honeywell Panels.

Qolsys iq siren z wave siren for qolsys iq and iq panel 2 qz2300

What's interesting is that the Qolsys IQ Siren learns-in with Honeywell Alarm Systems not as a Z-Wave siren, but as a Z-Wave light switch. This is not the case with the Qolsys IQ Panel 2, which immediately recognizes the IQ Siren for what it is - a siren. This way, the siren automatically activates during audible alarm events, with no special automation functions required. The 2GIG GC2 and 2GIG GC3 Alarm Systems also properly recognize the IQ Siren as a siren. We even wrote an FAQ and shot a video about this.

But since Honeywell Systems view the Qolsys IQ Siren as a light switch and not a siren, things become a little bit tricky. After all, you want the siren to operate like a siren, not a light switch! Fortunately, there's a way around this problem. That is using Total Connect 2.0 to create smart scenes. These scenes will tell the siren to activate when the Honeywell System experiences an audible alarm event, and also to stop sounding when the system is disarmed and the alarm is cleared. How's that for a creative solution?

It might take a little bit of extra work to get the Qolsys IQ Siren working on a Honeywell Security Panel, but it really is worth it. This is a 105 dB siren with a built-in strobe light to provide a visual indication of an alarm. For a sound comparison, 105 dB is about as loud as a table saw. It blows the 85 dB sounder built into the Lyric and LYNX Touch Systems out of the water. It's much easier to install than a hardwired siren, and it is extremely versatile overall. This makes the IQ Siren a winning option for many DIY users.

The Qolsys IQ Siren is great for any Honeywell System with a Z-Wave controller. Remember, the Lyric already includes a built-in Z-Wave controller, while the other panels need to have one added separately. The LYNX Touch Systems need a Honeywell L5100-ZWAVE Card, while the VISTA Panels need either a Honeywell VAM or a Honeywell Tuxedo Touch Keypad. It is also helpful to have access to Total Connect 2.0. If your monitoring plan does not include TC2, now is a great time to get started!

Please note that while you can create the necessary scenes from the panel and not from TC2 (with the exception of the Lyric system) we find that using TC2 is the easiest option. You can use the TC2 website or the mobile app on Android and iOS devices. We like using the website to create scenes. But if you prefer the mobile app, that's okay too!


Once you have paired the IQ Siren and logged into your TC2 account, it's time to create the scenes! Most users will want three scenes. These are:

  • A scene to activate the siren during a burglary alarm
  • A scene to activate the siren during a fire alarm
  • A scene to deactivate the siren during a panel disarm

For our example, we will be creating a scene for the fire alarm. The other scenes will follow a similar process. Start by navigating to the Scenes Menu. Then choose Add Scene. You will then name your scene:


Then you will include the IQ Siren into the scene. It will be listed under "Others". Since we are setting it to activate during an alarm, we will set the device to On for this scene. But if you wanted to have the siren stop sounding when an alarm is cleared, then it would be set to Off.


Next, you will set when the scene should run. Since it is being controlled by either a system alarm or a system disarm, you will choose "Triggered by another device". Then choose the appropriate function.



Finally, save your scene!


And that's it! Remember, you must do this for each individual scenario (burglary alarm, fire alarm, and to turn off upon disarm) if you want the IQ Siren to provide complete functionality. Alarm Grid monitored customers can always get further assistance by emailing support@alarmgrid.com. You can also call us at (888) 818-7728 during our normal business hours of 9am to 8pm EST M-F. If you aren't already monitored with Alarm Grid, make sure to press the orange Alarm Monitoring button at the top of this page. We look forward to working with you!

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Hi DIYers! Welcome to the first edition of Alarm Grid Tips! This is where we teach you basic principles about alarm systems. Most of these tips will be designed for beginners, so anyone can follow along! Today, we're going to show you why you should run a wire through the back of a panel.

Honeywell l5200 lynx touch wireless home security system and alarm control panel

One of the first things you will do when setting up an alarm system is power it on. This involves connecting a 2-conductor wire to the appropriate power terminals on the back of the panel. This is something you must do whether you are mounting the panel to the wall or using a desk mount to avoid drilling holes. The panel will ultimately receive its primary power from a plug-in transformer.

If you have a wireless system, you will want to run the unconnected power wire through the back plate before connecting it to the panel. This way, you can properly close the panel. If you try to connect the wire first, you will feel pretty silly when you have to disconnect the wire and then redo the same connections!

You can see this example below with a Honeywell L5200 System. First, let's see what happens if you don't run the wire through the back plate:



Now let's try again with the system wired correctly:



The principle is the same if you have a hardwired panel. These systems are normally housed inside a metal enclosure. You will want to run any connecting wires through one of the openings on the side or in the back. This way, you can properly close the metal cabinet door. You can see this on our Honeywell VISTA 21iP System below. Note that we removed the door for easy access, but we would be able to close it if it were still attached!


Also remember that you must follow proper polarity if your system is running DC power. The black wire will connect to the negative (-) terminals on the transformer and the panel. The red wire will connect to the positive (+) terminals on the transformer and the panel. If you are using AC power, then either wire can go to either terminal. Make sure you know whether your system uses AC or DC power before wiring!

Below is an example of DC transformer where proper polarity is followed:


That concludes today's Alarm Grid tip! Keep an eye on our blog for more tips in the future. We will also let you know if there's any important new security news. If you're an Alarm Grid customer in need of assistance, or if you are interested in an alarm monitoring plan, please reach out to us by emailing support@alarmgrid.com. You may also call us at (888) 818-7728 during our normal business hours of 9am to 8pm EST M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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Hi DIYers! We're back with another video recap today, this time covering March 4th thru 7th. We have seven new videos this time, so it really was a busy week. Our team loves making these videos and helping users learn how to use their security systems. Let's check out the new videos!

Adding a Qolsys Image Sensor to the Qolsys IQ Panel 2

Joe shows users how to pair a Qolsys Image Sensor to a Qolsys IQ Panel 2 System. The Qolsys Image Sensor is basically a motion sensor with a built-in camera. When it detects motion, the camera will take a picture and send it to Alarm.com. The end user can receive a notification from Alarm.com via text or email whenever an image comes through. They can then check the image to see if there is suspicious activity. The image sensor has a detection range of 30 feet.


Programming the 5800RP to an Alarm Panel

Joe demonstrates how to pair the Honeywell 5800RP Wireless Repeater with a Honeywell Alarm Panel. The 5800RP takes the signal from a Honeywell 5800 Series device and sends it out a second time. This effectively doubles its range. The module is technically a plug and play device, and you don't need to program it to a panel for it to repeat signals. But enrolling it is necessary if you want to receive alerts for RF supervision, low-battery and AC power loss.


Silencing the Exit Delay on a Honeywell Lyric System

Jorge the "Blue-Haired Bandit" explains how you can silence the Exit Delay on a Honeywell Lyric Alarm System. Whenever a user sets their Lyric to Arm Away, there will be continuous beeping during the Exit Delay countdown. A user can silence this countdown by selecting the Silent Exit button on the code entry screen. This option will also be available if a user selects Arm Custom. The Exit Delay period will be doubled whenever the countdown is silenced.


Using 2GIG Sensors With a Lyric System

Jorge explains how it is possible to use 2GIG 345 MHz Sensors with a Honeywell Lyric Security Panel. The Lyric System must be running firmware update MR3 or higher to support these sensors. The 2GIG Sensors operate on the same 345 MHz frequency as the Honeywell 5800 Series Sensors, only on a different channel. The Lyric can also support the Honeywell SiX Series Sensors, which utilize 128-bit AES encryption for added security. The SiX Sensors were designed exclusively for the Lyric.


Adding a Z-Wave Device to the Qolsys IQ Panel 2

Super-duper Alarm Grid Team Member Jarrett bounces into action by showing users how to pair a Z-Wave Smart Home device with the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 System. Once a Z-Wave device has been paired with an IQ Panel 2, a user will be able to control it directly from the panel and remotely from Alarm.com. Before trying to pair a Z-Wave device you should always clear it from the network first. It may have been paired with a different network for factory testing purposes.


Pairing the Qolsys IQ Remote With a Qolsys IQ Panel 2

Jorge goes through the process of pairing a Qolsys IQ Remote Keypad with a Qolsys IQ Panel 2 System. The IQ Remote provides a secondary on-site access point for an IQ Panel 2 System. It is great for users with larger properties who may want to control their system from multiple locations. The IQ Remote allows for all basic functions, including arming, disarming, bypassing sensors and controlling smart home devices. However, programming must still be completed from the main system.


Enrolling a Schlage Z-Wave Lock to a Qolsys IQ Panel 2

Jorge walks users through the steps for pairing a Schlage Z-Wave Lock with a Qolsys IQ Panel 2 System. The IQ Panel 2 includes a built-in Z-Wave controller for supporting Z-Wave devices. This includes most Z-Wave locks. Once the lock is paired, you can lock and unlock the door from both the panel and from Alarm.com. By using Alarm.com, the user can push user codes from the IQ Panel 2 to the Schlage Z-Wave Lock. This way, they can disarm their system and unlock their door by simply entering a valid panel user code into the lock.

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Hi DIYers! Today, we're going to be discussing Response Types and what exactly they refer to. Simply put, a zone's Response Type tells a security system how to respond when the associated sensor is activated. It is one of the most important settings when performing sensor programming.

Qolsys iq dw mini s encrypted wireless sensors for iq panel 2 qs

Whenever you enroll a new sensor, you will need to program a variety of settings. One of these settings is the Response Type. This is the zone setting that instructs the alarm system how to act when the sensor enrolled with that zone is faulted or activated. If you want your security system to function properly, then choosing the correct Response Type is crucial. After all, a programmed sensor is no good if the system doesn't take the appropriate action!

Not all systems refer to this setting as "Response Type". For example, the Qolsys and Interlogix/GE Systems refer to this setting as "Sensor Group". Meanwhile, 2GIG Systems take their own spin on the name by referring to the setting as "Sensor Type". But Honeywell Systems keep things simple by sticking with the "Response Type". name. These titles all basically refer to the same zone setting, but each may have slightly different selections available.

We have released some great FAQs in the past week that get into more detail regarding Response Types for specific panels. We encourage you to check them out at your convenience:

But whether you call the setting "Sensor Groups", "Sensor Types" or "Response Type", there are still some standard selections available across all panels. Let's take a quick look at the Top 5 most common Response Types used by security and life-safety sensors:


Entry/Exit

An Entry/Exit zone is a sensor that is activated when entering and exiting the building. As one might expect, it is usually reserved for door contacts used at entrances. You could also use it as a window contact if you like to use your window for coming and going - we won't judge!

When your system is Armed, the general expectation is that the next sensor that will be activated will be an Entry/Exit zone. This is because no other sensors are supposed to be faulted until someone new comes into the building. When an Entry/Exit zone is activated, the system understands that someone new has entered or exited the premises. It then responds accordingly based on the current Armed state.

If the system is Armed Away or Armed Stay and an Entry/Exit zone is activated, then you don't want an immediate alarm to occur. It's perfectly normal to come home for the day while your system is armed! However, you want to make sure that it's you entering the home, not a stranger! That is why the system will go into an Entry Delay countdown. This will give you a chance to disarm the system before an alarm occurs. If no disarm occurs within this period, the system will go into alarm.

A unique aspect of an Entry/Exit zone is that it can be used to put the system into Arm Away mode when Auto-Stay Arming is enabled. If you set the system to Arm Away, the expectation is that nobody is inside the building. As a result, at least one Entry/Exit zone would need to be activated during the Exit Delay countdown. If no Entry/Exit zone is activated during this period and Auto-Stay Arming is enabled, the system will revert to Arm Stay mode instead. You can learn more about Auto-Stay Arming here.

Honeywell 5816 wireless door window sensor

Interior Follower

An Interior Follower zone is a sensor located inside the property. It is usually reserved for door contacts that are not used for entering and exiting and motion sensors located inside. What's unique about Interior Follower sensors is that they are only active when the system is set to Arm Away. They are automatically bypassed when the system is set to Arm Stay. This way, anyone remaining inside the building can continue to move freely.

But if an Interior Follower sensor is activated while the system is Armed Away, then an immediate alarm will occur. This is because the system believes there is a security breach, and someone is inside the building when it should be empty. But there is one exception to this rule with Interior Follower zones. An Interior Follower zone will not cause an immediate alarm if it is activated after an Entry/Exit zone. In other words, the Interior Follower sensor follows the Entry/Exit sensor in that scenario.

The reason why the Follower aspect is important is because if a user activates an Entry/Exit zone while their system is Armed Away, they might need to walk past their Interior Follower motion sensor to get to their panel to disarm. With Interior Follower, the user won't have to worry about activating the sensor and causing an immediate alarm. As long as the Interior Follower sensor is activated following the Entry/Exit sensor, the user will still have a chance to disarm during the Entry Delay period like normal.

Honeywell 5800pir res wireless pet immune motion detector close up

Perimeter

A Perimeter zone is a security sensor that should never be activated while the system is set to Arm Away or Arm Stay. It is commonly used for glass break sensors or shock sensors that would really only be activated if someone were trying to break into the building. It is also commonly used with window contacts that an intruder might activate to gain entrance. This setting may also be used for an interior area if it is particularly secure.

With the Perimeter setting, a sensor will cause an immediate system alarm if it is activated while the system is armed. There will be no chance to disarm the system. However, no alarm will occur if the sensor is activated while the system is disarmed. This is one of the most secure zone options available. It is not for sensors that would be normally activated while the system is in an Armed state.

Honeywell sixgb wireless glass break detector

Day/Night

A Day/Night zone is a sensor that is always kept secure. It is short for "Trouble by Day and Alarm by Night". Some panels may simply shorten the name to a "Day" zone. This setting is commonly used for highly secure areas that should not normally be accessed. It may also be used with flood sensors or temperature sensors that are shouldn't activate in any system state. However, you should make sure to let the central station know that they are environmental sensors, not burglary sensors! Failure to do so could result in emergency dispatch due to something like a water leak or a broken HVAC unit!

If a Day/Night sensor activates while the system is Disarmed, then a trouble condition will appear on the panel. But if the system is Armed, then an immediate alarm will occur. The idea with the name is that the system would normally be Disarmed during the Day and Armed at night. This option as good for many situations because it will make sure the user is alerted regardless of the current system state. But they will only receive emergency dispatch if the system is armed.

2gig ft1 345 flood and temperature sensor

24-Hour

A 24-Hour zone is the most secure type of sensor used with a system. This is a sensor that should never be activated unless there is a real emergency. There are multiple types of 24-Hour zones, including 24-Hour Fire, 24-Hour Auxiliary and 24-Hour Carbon Monoxide. As one might expect, a 24-Hour zone is most often used with life-safety devices like smoke detectors, carbon monoxide detectors, panic buttons and medical alert buttons. It may also be used for doors that should absolutely never be opened, such as emergency exits or fire doors.

If a 24-Hour zone is activated, an immediate alarm will occur. This will happen whether the system is Armed or Disarmed. A central station takes these zones very seriously, and these sensors should only be activated in an emergency. Reserve these zones for the most secure sensors only. If you don't expect the central station to request immediate dispatch when a 24-Hour zone activates, you should make sure to provide special instructions to the monitoring station.

Honeywell 5806w3 wireless smoke detector

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Hi DIYers! You may be pleased to learn that Underwriters Laboratories (UL) is now allowing online open-access to their library of UL Safety Standards. The catalog can be viewed by any installer, organization or safety and security enthusiast. This includes more than 1,400 safety standards.

UL is the world's leader for maintaining consistent and reliable safety standards. Their safety standards cover nearly every electrical appliance found in residential and commercial locations. The company marks equipment as certified after strict and rigorous testing. Its stamp of approval is global symbol for safety. UL currently operates approximately 46 laboratories and 200 inspection centers in more than 70 countries.

For manufacturers of security equipment, receiving UL approval is crucial for ensuring the public that their products are safe, trustworthy and reliable. UL Standards are also important for installers who want to ensure that their work is up to code and of the highest-quality. According to UL, making their catalog of Safety Standards accessible to the public is a major step for keeping their standards relevant and ensuring that the entire safety industry stays educated.

We think it's great that UL has taken this step to make their safety standards accessible to everyone. This truly benefits the DIY security industry, as DIY installers will now have an easier time in safely completing their projects and meeting the appropriate standards. If you're a DIY user of a security system, we strongly recommend that you follow these standards to achieve the most reliable and consistent installation possible.

You can view the UL Safety Standards Catalog here. We hope that this helps to make your life easier as a DIY Alarm Grid customer!

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Alarm Grid wants all of its customers to be aware that AT&T is now taking steps to formally discontinue their 3G and 4G networks. This is very important for anyone looking to activate an AT&T 3G or 4G communicator, as well as those who currently use either network with their alarm system.

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Starting Wednesday June 26th, 2019, it will no longer be possible to activate a new AT&T 3G or 4G Communicator with AlarmNet. If you want to activate an AT&T 3G or 4G Communicator on a Honeywell System for use with Total Connect 2.0, you must do so before this date. Additionally, if you deactivate an AT&T 3G or 4G Communicator for a Honeywell System on or after this date, then you will not be able to reactivate it. Trying to reactivate a deactivated communicator is considered the same as an activation.

Please note that this only applies to AT&T 3G and 4G Communicators on Honeywell Systems that are used with Total Connect 2.0. Alarm.com has not announced any deadline for activating an AT&T 3G or 4G Communicator. Alarm Grid will post any new information as it becomes available. For now, the deadline only affects communicators being used with AlarmNet.

A sole exception applies to any AT&T 3G or 4G Communicator that was manufactured within the past 180 days. These communicators come with SIM cards that are pre-activated by AT&T, and they can continue to be activated for the next 180 days, even after the June 26th, 2019 date has passed. You will not be able to activate the communicator after the 180 day period has elapsed. You will also not be able to deactivate the communicator and then have it reactivated. You can check the manufacture date both on the box and on the radio label sticker on the communicator.

Additionally, the AT&T 3G/4G Network is set to be shutdown in February 2022. After that, all AT&T 3G and 4G Communicators will stop working entirely. This applies to any AT&T 3G or AT&T 4G Communicator, including those used with Total Connect 2.0 or Alarm.com. End users will need to upgrade to a new communicator or alarm system to maintain cellular communication. This does not apply to AT&T 4G LTE Communicators.

In order to maintain an active cellular communication path, it is crucial that you upgrade to an LTE communicator. LTE stands for "Long-Term Evolution", and AT&T is expected to support their LTE network for many years to come. Most alarm systems that we support currently have an LTE communicator available, while others should be releasing one in the coming months. We recommend checking through our selection of cellular communicators to see if an LTE communicator is available for your system.

Honeywell lyric lte a at and t lte cellular communicator for the

If you are affected by the AT&T 3G/4G Sunset, now is the time to take action. You still have an opportunity to keep your system monitored or upgrade to a new system if necessary. The best thing you can do is contact Alarm Grid immediately. We can verify which communicator your system is using if you aren't sure. If you do need an upgrade, we can make a recommendation of which communicator to go with.

Some systems may have an LTE communicator readily available, while others may have one set to be released in the coming weeks. Unfortunately, some users may need to upgrade to a new system entirely. The experts at Alarm Grid know exactly what you need to stay monitored, and we can present you with all the possible options. Remember, by upgrading to a newer LTE communicator, you are guaranteeing that you equipment can stay monitored for many years to come. We fully expect that LTE networks will remain active and in-service even as 5G technology begins to emerge.

Alarm Grid is on your side. We want you to stay monitored and protected. That is our absolute top priority as a company. If you are affected by the AT&T 3G/4G Sunset, we urge you to reach out to us. Likewise, we also urge you to reach out to us if you are not sure. We can check your equipment and confirm whether or not an upgrade is needed.

The best way to reach us is to send an email to support@alarmgrid.com. Our team will reply to it as soon as possible so that you receive the support you need. You may also call us at (888) 818-7728 during our normal business hours of 9am to 8pm EST M-F. We look forward to helping you determine the best solution for your home or business.

Note: For information on the Verizon CDMA Sunset that went into effect last year, please click here.

Alarm grid inside security stickers

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Hi DIYers! Today, we're taking a look at the 2GIG RPTR1-345. This is a wireless repeater that takes the signal sent out from 2GIG 345 MHz Sensors and repeats them out a second time. This will effectively double their range. The device also works with the Honeywell 5800 Series Sensors.

2gig rptr1 345 wireless repeater

Wireless sensors work by sending radio frequency signals to an alarm control panel. However, these signals cannot travel an infinite distance. If a user is experiencing range issues, then they might add a wireless repeater to overcome the problem. A wireless repeater will take the signal sent out from the sensor and send it out a second time. By doing this, the sensor's range will be doubled.

In order for a wireless repeater to work, it must recognize the signal transmission that the sensor is putting out. The 2GIG RPTR1-345 effectively works the same as the wireless receiver housed inside the 2GIG GC2 and 2GIG GC3 Systems. The panel's receiver also accepts signals from Honeywell 5800 Sensors, and the 2GIG RPTR1-345 will also effectively repeat these signals. This makes it perfect for anyone with legacy Honeywell/2GIG Sensors who wants to increase wireless signal range.

Most 2GIG 345 MHz Sensors have a wireless range of 350 feet in open air. However, this range can be reduced due to large metal objects and other obstacles. Mounting a sensor on a metal door or structure could also interfere with the range. Also keep in mind that some recessed sensors like 2GIG DW20R might have a shorter range than other 2GIG Sensors. But adding a 2GIG RPTR1-345 may be able to help you overcome the problem.

If the signal from a 2GIG 345 MHz Sensor travels 350 feet to the repeater, the repeater will take that same signal and send it out an additional 350 feet. This will give the sensor a maximum range of 700 nominal feet. This can be the perfect solution for anyone suffering from range issues. The repeater will even work with the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus with Legacy 345 MHz Daughtercard, as it can repeat the signal for any legacy 345 MHz sensors used with the system.

The 2GIG RPTR1-345 is a plug-and-play device, meaning that it will start repeating signals as soon as it is plugged into a wall outlet. You don't need to program it to the panel for it to work. However, you can still program it to a wireless zone for supervision purposes. This is completely optional, but it can be smart if you have several wireless zones available. Please note that while a plug-in transformer is included, no wiring is provided. You can use a Honeywell LT-Cable to making wiring as easy as possible.

In addition to the 2GIG RPTR1-345, Alarm Grid also offers the other wireless repeater modules:

Please note that there is currently no repeater available for Honeywell SiX Series Sensors. We hope that will change in the near future, as there are many user who would like to increase the range of their SiX Devices. We will let you know if such a module ever emerges.

You can extend the signal range of your 2GIG Sensors with the 2GIG RPTR1-345 wireless repeater. Get yours today!

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Hi DIYers! We're here with the latest video recap from Alarm Grid. Our team managed to put up 9 new videos during the past two weeks, and we are eager to share them with you. Take a look at these new videos, as Alarm Grid techs teach you how to get the most of your security system!

Programming the 5800Combo to a Vista Panel

Joe covers the process of enrolling a Honeywell 5800COMBO with a Honeywell VISTA Alarm System. In order for the sensor to work with the system, a 345 MHz wireless receiver must be added.The sensor will require five zones for full functionality. These zones are for smoke/heat detection, CO detection, low-temperature detection, maintenance, and end of product life. Each zone must be programmed individually. If you don't want to use a particular function, you can skip programming that zone.


Using the 2-Way Voice Feature with an Alarm.com Camera on the Qolsys IQ Panel 2

Joe demonstrates the audio streaming feature on the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 that is compatible with certain Alarm.com Cameras. The feature is available for Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Systems that are running firmware version 2.2.1 or higher. By using this feature, the user can have a live conversation with whoever is at their camera right from the IQ Panel 2. The option of "Audio for Non-Doorbell Cameras" must be enabled by the user's alarm monitoring provider. The panel and the Camera should be connected on the same WIFI network.


How Do I Setup Multi-System Account Access in Alarm.com?

Joe shows users the process of linking multiple Alarm.com accounts together. The benefit to do this is that the user will be able to control all their Alarm.com locations conveniently from a single login. This is great for users who operate security systems across multiple locations. The pairing process must be completed using the Alarm.com website. The user will need to provide the username and password for any account they want to pair when syncing the different Alarm.com accounts.


Upgrading the 2GIG GC3 to an LTE Communicator

Jorge completes the process of upgrading a 2GIG GC3 to use an LTE cellular communicator. An example of an LTE communicator for the 2GIG GC3 is the 2GIG LTEV1-A-GC3. When swapping out the old communicator, the user should make sure to power down their system first. Failing to do this could result in system damage. By upgrading to an LTE communicator, an end user will enjoy faster speeds and greater reliability. They will also extend the life of their system, as LTE is expected to remain in service well into the distant future.


Programming a New SiX Series Device Into an Older Lyric System

Jorge explains why some users might experience trouble when trying to program newer Honeywell SiX Series Sensors with an older Honeywell Lyric Alarm System. The problem occurs because the newest SiX Series Sensors have an updated MAC prefix that is not compatible with Lyric Systems that are not running at least firmware version MR7 or higher. Any customer who is monitored by Alarm Grid can have the latest firmware pushed down to their Lyric System. This is a free over-the-air firmware update.


Learning the DSC PG9929 Key FOB to the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus

Jorge teaches users how to enroll a DSC PG9929 Key Fob to a Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus. The IQ Panel 2 Plus Systems have PowerG daughtercards that allow them to support the 915 MHz PowerG Sensors. However, these sensors enroll in a unique manner. The system should be in its auto-enrollment mode. The user must then press and hold the enrollment button, which is the star (*) button for the PG9929. The button should be held until an LED light appears for a second time. They can then release the button to enroll.


Learning the DSC PG9938 Panic Switch to the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus

Jorge demonstrates the process of enrolling a DSC PG9938 Panic Switch to the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus. The PG9938 is a personal panic switch that can be enrolled with the IQ2+ like any other PowerG Sensor. Pressing this button will trigger an immediate system panic. The device is perfect for elderly or disabled individuals who may need to call for hep in case of an accident or fall. It can also be used to trigger a panic alarm from virtually anywhere on the property. The button must be pressed and held, which helps to avoid false alarms.


Honeywell Thermostats and Total Connect 2.0 Compatibility

Joe tells users which thermostats will work with Total Connect 2.0. The simple answer is that Z-Wave thermostats from any manufacturer that can enroll with your Honeywell Alarm System, along with most Honeywell WIFI Thermostats can be operated through Total Connect 2.0. However, Z-Wave thermostats will offer greater functionality through TC2 than WIFI thermostats. This is because only Z-Wave thermostats can be used with TC2 Smart Scenes. But certain WIFI thermostats can be used with other platforms like Apple HomeKit.


Arming the Lyric in Stay Mode

Jarrett teaches users how to put the Honeywell Lyric Controller into Arm Stay mode. This is the arming mode to use if someone is going to remain inside the building. In Arm Stay mode, all interior zones are automatically bypassed. This way, the end user can move throughout the building without having to worry about setting off an alarm. However, entry/exit zones, perimeter zones and 24-hours zones will still respond as if the system was set to Arm Away.

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Hi DIYers! Today, we're going to discuss why dual-path alarm monitoring is so great. Simply put, it is the most reliable alarm monitoring available. This fast and reliable communication path offers all the benefits of both IP monitoring and cellular monitoring in one convenient package!

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Dual-path monitoring means that the security system uses two communication paths for alarm monitoring service. The vast majority of the time these two communication paths are IP (WIFI or ethernet) and cellular. While it is technically possible to use POTS (plain old telephone service) connectivity as one of the communication paths, this is becoming increasingly rare due to to the poor performance of phone lines. For our discussion, we will assume that dual-path is referring to IP and cellular connectivity being used together on the same system.

Depending on the system, dual-path monitoring is performed in different ways. Panels that use Alarm.com will send out all alerts and notifications across both IP and cellular paths at once. These outgoing signals will be sent to Alarm.com, where they will be processed and forwarded to the monitoring station and/or to the customer via text, email or push notification. The first message received by Alarm.com is processed, and the other message is discarded. In this way, Alarm.com assures that each individual signal uses the fastest path available. An important note here is that Alarm.com requires a special cellular radio to communicate with their service. This is why Alarm Grid customers who want Alarm.com must sign-up for a Gold Plan or higher.

Alarm panels that use AlarmNet and Total Connect 2.0 behave a little differently. These panels supervise the IP connection. As long as the IP connection is available, all signals are sent via this path. If the panel senses that the IP connection is down, it will then revert to the cellular path. AlarmNet receives these signals and sends them to the central monitoring station and/or Total Connect 2.0. From there, TC2 forwards the appropriate notifications to the end user's phone or email address based on the user's notification settings.

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While it's technically true that an alarm system only needs one active and reliable communication path for monitoring, using a dual-path setup with two active communication paths offers some key benefits. Whether your system uses Alarm.com or AlarmNet/TC2, dual-path connectivity will let you be sure that your alarm signals are always received and processed successfully.

A dual-path connection can be a saving grace if one signal path fails. While having an IP or cellular signal fail to reach its intended destination is quite rare, it certainly happens every once in awhile. But with dual-path connectivity, it's okay if one signal doesn't make it through. As long as the other signal still reaches its intended destination, the end user's monitoring service will continue to work as intended. Signaling on either path will accomplish the same goal. Whether both paths are utilized at the same time or only the cellular path is used due to the IP path being down, either will provide the same information. Whichever signal reaches the destination will be processed.

More often than not, it's the IP signal that fails to reach its intended destination. Most people will still experience short and temporary internet outages from time to time. Additionally, a power outage can knock out a router and cause the internet to go down. If this were to happen during an alarm event, and your security panel only used an IP communication path, you would certainly be in a very troubling situation. For that reason, you will definitely want that cellular backup to keep your home safe! In fact, this is why we generally view modern cellular service as superior to IP connectivity.

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Cellular communication is extremely reliable and consistent, making it perfect for alarm systems. Cellular towers almost never go out of service, and coverage maps are continuously increasing in scope. This allows cellular to reign supreme as the single-best communication path. You might be asking yourself - why not just use cellular only? That is because IP connectivity is still technically faster in most cases. Plus, in the highly unlikely event that cellular service is ever down, you can actually use your IP service to back it up. While it's incredibly rare for a cell tower to be out of service, it has happened before! Also, our cellular monitoring plans already include internet anyway.

So what do you need to achieve a fast and reliable dual-path communication setup? You just need a compatible system and a Gold Level Plan or higher from Alarm Grid. Your system will need an IP communicator and a cellular communicator both installed. Currently, the only system we sell that is both WIFI and cellular ready right out of the box is the Qolsys IQ Panel 2. This also includes the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus Systems. Most other alarm systems can also be configured to use a dual-path setup. However, you may need to purchase an IP communicator or a cellular communicator separately. We also advise checking out our kits, which often include both communicators.

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If you're looking to get started with monitoring service, we invite you to check out our alarm monitoring page for more information. Remember, you will need a Gold Plan or higher for a dual-path setup. The Gold Plan is listed as "Cellular Monitoring", but it includes internet connectivity as well. If you have any questions, you can always contact us at support@alarmgrid.com. For users who prefer to speak on the phone, you can call (888) 818-7728 to talk with one of our security planners. We operate phone hours from 9am to 8pm EST M-F. We look forward to working with you and helping you achieve your security goals!

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