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We have some exciting new products from Alarm.com now available on our site. The main highlight is the Alarm.com Slim Line II Doorbell Camera from SkyBell. We also have some great new accessories for the existing Alarm.com ADC-VB770 Doorbell Camera. These products are available now!


The SkyBell ADC-VDB105X (Satin Nickel) and SkyBell ADC-VDB106X (Bronze) refer to the new versions of the ADC-VB105 and ADC-VDB106. You may recall these as the "Slim Line" versions of the Alarm.com SkyBell Video Doorbells. The new models retain all of the existing features, while also offering some general improvements. While officially being titled as "SkyBell" devices, they are more commonly referred to as the Alarm.com Slim Line II Video Doorbell Cameras.

Some of the highlights for the Alarm.com Slim Line II Doorbell Cameras include their adjustable 720p recording resolution, their 1.3 MP full-color video camera, two-way voice functionality, WIFI connectivity, a 170° horizontal and 110° vertical field of view (FoV), IR night vision, an IPX4 weather-resistant rating, adjustable PIR sensitivity, real-time alerts, automation rules, an integrated battery heater for seamless operation in cold weather, doorbell-triggered and motion-triggered clips, and much more.

Since these are SkyBell devices, you can technically add one (1) of these devices to your Alarm.com account, even if you do not have true video monitoring service. If you do this, then you will be restricted to only one (1) SkyBell Doorbell Camera, along with 400 monthly clips and 400 total clips. This is a great option if you have an Alarm Grid Gold Plan, and you don't want to upgrade all the way to an Alarm Grid Platinum Plan for true video surveillance. More information can be found in this FAQ covering Alarm.com Clip Limits. Please note that if you want to use additional video devices or increase your clip limits, then you will need to upgrade to a full video monitoring plan. If you use one of these devices with a true video monitoring plan, such as an Alarm Grid Platinum Plan, then the doorbell will just count toward your regular Alarm.com Camera limits, as well as your Alarm.com Clip limits. Also keep in mind that since these are Alarm.com SkyBell models, they should not be used with any interactive platform outside of Alarm.com. They should also not be used with the native SkyBell App. Attempting to use one of these devices with the SkyBell App may make the camera completely incompatible with Alarm.com.

In addition to the Alarm.com Slim Line II Video Doorbell Cameras, we are also now offering several new doorbell camera accessories. These accessories are not for the new Alarm.com Slim Line II Doorbell Camera, but rather they are for the existing Alarm.com ADC-VDB770 Doorbell Camera. This is the "higher-end" doorbell camera that we began offering late last year. It represents the ultimate option for Alarm.com users who are looking for the very best doorbell camera available.

The new accessories for the ADC-VDB770 include:

  • ADC-VDBA-COVER - Touchless Doorbell Cover that lets guests know to not touch the video doorbell. Used in conjunction with the Video Doorbell Mat.
  • ADC-VDBA-MAT - Video Doorbell Mat that lets guests know to activate the camera by standing on the mat. Used in conjunction with the Touchless Doorbell Cover.
  • ADC-VDBA-PSU-PD - Video Doorbell Wall Power Supply Kit that is used if there is no existing chime circuit, or if the chime circuit is incompatible. Can be used with or without a power module. Device is rated at 16 Volts DC, 1.25 Amps, or 20 Watts.
  • ADC-VDBA-TC - Temperature Collar Accessory that allows the doorbell camera to be safely used in temperatures as low a -40°F. Can be used with or without the Wall Mounting Plate.
  • ADC-VDBA-WP - Wall Mounting Plate that hides blemishes such as missing paint or screw holes. Goes in-between the wall and the doorbell camera. Dimensions are 5.43"L by 3.43"W.

If you have any questions about the Alarm.com Slim Line II Doorbell Camera or any of the new accessories for the ADC-VDB770, please email our support team at support@alarmgrid.com. That is also a good email to use if you are interested in starting new alarm monitoring service with Alarm Grid. We're here to answer your emails from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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We have learned that Alarm.com is planning to discontinue their popular residential streaming video recorder device, the Alarm.com ADC-SVR122. This device is used to store security camera footage so that it can be accessed locally at the ADC-SVR122 or remotely through the Alarm.com servers.


For now, Alarm.com recommends using their Onboard Recording feature as an alternative to using a dedicated streaming video recorder (SVR) device. The Alarm.com Onboard Recording feature allows you to store encrypted 24/7 recording footage locally onto a MicroSD card. It requires a compatible Alarm.com Camera, which includes the ADC-V515, ADC-V523, and ADC-V723. You may recall that these three (3) cameras also represent our current Top Picks for Alarm.com Security Cameras. You will also need the feature added to your Alarm.com account, as well as a compatible SD card. So make sure to your alarm monitoring company enables this feature. The SD card can be 256 GB maximum, and we have some compatible options listed below.

  • Micron Industrial Memory Cards
  • SanDisk High Endurance
  • WD Purple Micro SD Cards

Alarm.com will also still offer the Alarm.com ADC-CSVR126 Streaming Video Recorder. This product, while being built to handle the needs of a commercial location, accomplishes essentially the same thing as the ADC-SVR122. It supports up to sixteen (16) total cameras, and it comes in 2 TB and 12 TB storage options, with the possibility of being upgradable to 16 TB storage. While this is honestly a bit of overkill for most residential applications, it does represent an option if you require a streaming video recorder for your Alarm.com Cameras.

For now, the Alarm.com ADC-SVR122 will remain available for purchase in the 500 GB storage variant only while supplies last. Once we run out of stock, it will no longer be available. If you are an Alarm Grid monitored customer wanting to set up the Onboard Recording feature, or if you are interested in starting new alarm monitoring service with Alarm Grid, send us an email at support@alarmgrid.com. We are here to receive your emails from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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We recently came across an article from Bonka Bird Toys expressing their satisfaction with Alarm Grid and their new security system and security camera setup. Bonka Bird Toys is a local business, located right down the road from Alarm Grid. Thank you Bonka for your continued support!


Bonka Bird Toys has quite an intricate setup, centered around a Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus Security System. It is a dual-path system, complete with encrypted PowerG Sensors, and four (4) IQ Remote Keypads. Bonka says that they opted to not mount their IQ Remote Keypads, and instead carry them around loose like small tablets, and keep them at their desks. They particularly love being able to check their security cameras right from their IQ Remote devices. Having an IQ Remote at each workstation is really convenient!


According to Bonka Bird Toys, their favorite part of their setup is their security cameras. They used two (2) types of commercial grade Alarm.com Security Cameras, including the Alarm.com ADC-VC736 and the Alarm.com ADC-VC836. They even added the Alarm.com ADC-CSVR126 Commercial Streaming Video Recorder to facilitate a continuous 24-hour recording schedule. In addition to their IQ Panel 2 Plus and their IQ Remote Keypads, Bonka also set up a dedicated monitor that shows their camera feeds. They placed it up in a prominent spot where they can check it any time. We think this is a fantastic example of what kind of setup you can achieve with a security system and Alarm.com Cameras!


Bonka Bird Toys also set up a complete automation network of Z-Wave Plus devices, including lights, door locks, and thermostats. They love being able to control these devices locally from their alarm panel and keypads, and remotely from the Alarm.com platform on their phones and computers. Bonka Bird Toys also states that it was really easy to install their equipment. It took them just a single afternoon to get everything ready and going, and they saved thousands of dollars by doing it themselves rather than hiring a professional installer. This is the same type of robust setup that you can achieve for your home or business. And you can easily install everything yourself to save money,

If you are looking for the best bird toys, birdcages, aviaries, and accessories, then be sure to check out the Bonka Bird Toys website. And if you have any questions about how you can get started with Alarm Grid monitoring service, then reach out to us by emailing our support team and security system planners at support@alarmgrid.com. We're here to check your emails from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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For Alarm.com Cameras, it can be a bit overwhelming with all of the great options available. Today, we're going to keep things simple by checking out the three (3) cameras that provide the best features and ease of use for the typical homeowner. Here are the top picks for Alarm.com Cameras.


The cameras we are checking out today are all built for residential use. However, you should have no problem using them to monitor a small business if needed. These cameras are differentiated from the Alarm.com Commercial Cameras because they do not have an extra C in the SKU, or name. Any Alarm.com Camera with a SKU of ADC-V###, with the ### representing a three digit number is a residential camera. They should not be confused with the cameras with SKUs in the ADC-VC### format. That extra C after the V indicates Commercial. And while the Alarm.com Commercial Cameras are fantastic, and they can certainly be used in the home, most residential users will have an easier time getting started with the corresponding residential cameras.

As far as what makes the residential cameras different from the commercial cameras, there is one feature that really stands out. The Alarm.com Residential Cameras are WIFI cameras that connect wirelessly to the local WIFI you already have set up in your home. But the Alarm.com Commercial Cameras are typically Power Over Ethernet (PoE). A PoE camera will not connect wirelessly to WIFI. Instead, you will need to run an ethernet cable to the camera, which will supply both internet and electrical power. A non-PoE WIFI camera will instead have its own plug-in transformer that you can just plug into any outlet. While many users appreciate the ability to set up a camera with PoE, most homeowners will have an easier time just connecting the camera to WIFI and finding a nearby outlet to use. Therefore, when it comes to residential cameras, WIFI is considered supreme.

For any Alarm.com Camera, you will need a monitoring plan that includes video surveillance to start using them. If you already have a security system that uses Alarm.com, such as a Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus or a 2GIG GC3e, then you will likely just need to upgrade your existing monitoring plan. If you are new to alarm monitoring and plan on setting up a security system as well, then the Alarm Grid Platinum Plan is a great option that combines top-of-the-line alarm monitoring service, including central station coverage, with the video surveillance features that you and your family need. Or if you don't have a security system, and you just want to use Alarm.com Cameras, then you may explore the Alarm Grid Video Only Plan, which offers affordable video surveillance for users who just want that service.

Of course, for any video monitoring plan, you will need some cameras, so let's get into the three Alarm.com Cameras we intend on checking out today!

First up we have the Alarm.com ADC-V523, which is honestly the go-to Alarm.com Residential Camera for standard, indoor use. It is the gold-standard of Alarm.com Cameras, offering all of the features and performance you could possibly want. It has a premium image sensor (1/2.7” CMOS, 2.1 MP, 1920 x 1080, HDR) and camera lens (3.0mm, F2.0) to capture activity around your home in true 1080p quality, with High Dynamic Range (HDR). Also included is IR Night Vision, which effectively captures video at night or in an otherwise dark setting from up to ~15 feet away. And a viewing angle of 117° ensures that no action is missed, providing a wider coverage area and field of view (FoV) for when you need it most. Simply put, if you need an indoor camera, and you don't want to sacrifice anything in terms of quality, then the Alarm.com ADC-V523 is for you.


But if you don't need quite all the bells and whistles, then you might instead consider the new budget camera from Alarm.com, presenting the Alarm.com ADC-V515. This camera offers all of the same features as the premium ADC-V523, with a slightly toned down image. You still get the 1080p quality and High Dynamic Range (HDR), but the image sensor is a bit reduced (1/3", 2.12 MP, 1920x1080, HDR), and the lens is just a bit smaller (3.19 mm, F2.2). Also viewing angle FoV is 7-degrees reduced at 110°. But otherwise, this is pretty much the same camera. You still get the ~15 Feet IR Night Vision and all of the other great features. Quite frankly, most users will not notice any bit of difference with this camera. If you want an outstanding camera at the best price Alarm.com can offer, then the Alarm.com ADC-V515 is for you.

Last but not least is Alarm.com's best offering for a residential outdoor camera, the Alarm.com ADC-V723. This premium outdoor model brings the same features and performance as the ADC-V523, but presents it in a package that can withstand the harshness of an outdoor environment. Returning is the same fantastic image sensor (1/2.7” CMOS, 2.1 MP, 1920 x 1080, HDR), camera lens (3.0mm, F2.0), and wide viewing angle FoV (117°), but there are two (2) things that separate this camera. First, the ADC-V723 has an amped up IR Night Vision range of ~40 feet, compared with just ~15 feet of the indoor model. This is important if you have a big backyard and need to capture night prowlers in the act. And the second change, making the camera perfect for ourdoor use is the ingress protection, IP66. You can trust this camera to work perfectly even with exposure to rain, snow, wind, heavy sunlight, and heavy dust. It will keep on recording strong and monitoring your home for suspicious activity. If you want a tremendous 1080p HDR outdoor camera, then look no further than the Alarm.com ADC-V723.


If you have any questions about the Alarm.com Cameras we presented here today, or any of the other cameras offered from Alarm.com, please send an email to suppor@alarmgrid.com. We are happy to help you find the perfect cameras to use around your home. Our hours for checking email run from 9am to 8pm ET M-F, so keep that in mind when contacting our support team. We look forward to hearing from you!

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Alarm Grid is now offering a new "alternate" version of the Resideo ProSeries 7" All-In-One Panel. In addition to the existing Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS, Alarm Grid customers now have the option of the new Resideo PROA7PLUSC Security System. Both options are the same, except for one aspect.


Before you get super excited and full of anticipation, we're sorry to spoil the fun. The change really isn't anything too revolutionary. While the Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS reads "Honeywell Home" across the front of the panel, the Resideo PROA7PLUSC instead reads "Resideo" across its front. Yes, other than that small aesthetic change, these are the same alarm panels, with the same features, the same compatibility, and the same performance.

Why did Resideo bother to do this? From what we can tell, it's a marketing decision. They wanted the brand recognition of the "Honeywell Home" namesake, but since businesses may not want to use a product with "Home" in the title, the "Resideo" version is available as well. Indeed, the Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS is officially the "residential" version, while the Resideo PROA7PLUSC is officially the "commercial" version. We know, it's a bit redundant, but ask yourself this - are you really surprised?

You are free to throw caution to the wind of course. If you want to use the "commercial" Resideo PROA7PLUSC with the corporate sticker of "Resideo" boldly adorning the alarm panel that you use in your residence, feel free. Or conversely, if you're a business owner wanting to bring the comfort of "home" into the office, then you're welcome to use the "residential" Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS with the "Honeywell Home" moniker. It really won't make much of a difference, but you can go with whichever option makes you happier.

You may actually recall that Resideo did something similar with the new Tuxedo Keypad for their hardwired Honeywell VISTA Security Systems. In that realm, you can choose between the Honeywell Home TUXEDOW with "Honeywell Home" emblazoned across the front panel, or you can opt for the Resideo TUXEDOWC with "Resideo" taking the spotlight. Again, that is the only difference between the two keypad models. Now Resideo is doing it again with their wireless panels. Will it be the last time they do this? Our bets are on "No", but time will tell.

Anyway, whether you choose the PROA7PLUS or PROA7PLUSC, you are getting a fantastic wireless alarm panel with some outstanding features. We have already covered the system in extensive detail before, so please check out our introduction and buying guide for the system that we put out late last year.

We must also report that local programming is still yet to be released, so you will need your alarm monitoring company to perform virtually all tasks remotely when it comes to setting up the system. Our understanding is that the systems (yes, both of them) will soon be made to support local programming, hopefully in the coming months. We also have no word on when, or even if, Apple HomeKit functionality will become a reality. For now, if you want a panel that does support end-user programming AND offers a robust integration with Apple HomeKit, you might instead consider the Honeywell Lyric Alarm System, which in many ways is still the superior option.

If you have any questions about the Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS, the Resideo PROA7PLUSC, the Honeywell Lyric, or if you just want to learn about alarm monitoring in general, contact our team via email at support@alarmgrid.com. We are here to check your email from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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One of the more interesting things about the Honeywell Home PROSIX Sensor lineup is that it features two (2) different "mini" door and window sensors. These are the Honeywell Home PROSIXMINI and the Honeywell Home PROSIXMINI2. Today, we will be comparing and contrasting these sensors.


When the Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS Alarm Panel first hit the market, a new lineup of sensors also made their debut. These are the Honeywell Home PROSIX Sensors, and they make the perfect complement to Resideo's latest security system. These devices are best-known for their 128-bit AES encryption and their improved wireless range over the Honeywell and Resideo Sensors that came before them. The PROSIX Sensors can only be used with the PROA7PLUS, and until Resideo makes local programming available for the system, you will need the help of your monitoring company to enroll any new sensor.

At first glance, the PROSIX Sensor Family seems pretty straightforward. It is a very robust lineup, featuring everything from security sensors like motion detectors and glassbreak listeners, to environmental sensors like flood sensors and temperature sensors. But there is one anomaly that often makes people turn heads. That is the presence of two (2) different "mini" door and window contact sensors, the PROSIXMINI and the PROSIXMINI2. Both are surface-mounted contact sensors, and both monitor an interior door or window for opening and closing. A third sensor in the lineup, the PROSIXCT also accomplishes the same task, but that sensor is considerably larger and features an auxiliary input to provide wireless transmitter functionality. But it begs the question - why is there both a PROSIXMINI and a PROSIXMINI2?

Starting with the PROSIXMINI, this sensor actually looks virtually identical to the Honeywell SiXMINICT from the Honeywell SiX Series Lineup made popular by the Lyric Controller. It's likely that Resideo took the same plastic casing from the SiXMINICT and repurposed it for the PROSIXMINI. And when compared the alternative option from the same sensor generation, the PROSIXMINI2, the only category where the PROSIXMINI "wins" is in size. The PROSIXMINI (2.44"L x 1.25"W x 0.45"D) is the smaller and more discrete sensor when compared with the larger and slightly bulkier PROSIXMINI2 (2.9"L x 1.15"W x 0.75"D). The reason why the PROSIXMINI is able to maintain a smaller profile and relatively "flat" design is thanks to its use of a CR2450 coin battery. Meanwhile, the PROSIXMINI2 uses a CR2 battery, which has a more traditional, cylindrical shape,

But before you go declaring the PROSIXMINI to be the winner, you might to consider the fact that the PROSIXMINI2 outshines its smaller and flatter competitor in virtually every other possible aspect. The PROSIXMINI2 has a wireless range of 500+ feet in open air, while the PROSIXIMINI is limited to 200+ feet. The PROSIXMINI2 also wins in the battle of battery life, as its lithium CR2 battery should last about seven (7) years before a replacement is needed. The lithium CR2450 battery inside the PROSIXMINI can only be counted on for about five (5) years. Also, some equipment testing has shown that the use of coin cell batteries inside a sensor can be problematic. It's likely that Resideo wanted to give users an alternative option that uses a more trustworthy battery.


Now, you're likely wondering, which sensor should you get? The PROSIXMINI or the PROSIXMINI2? If aesthetics are the single most important concern to you, and you simply want the smallest and most discreet sensor, the you can make a case for the PROSIXMINI. But if you ask us, we think the PROSIXMINI2 is the superior option, because of its improved signal range, extended battery life, and more reliable battery performance in general. But rest assured, both the PROSIXMINI and the PROSIXMINI2 should work very well on any PROA7PLUS Security System.

If you need help deciding on sensors for your system, or if you are an Alarm Grid monitored customer needing us to help you enroll new sensors with your PROA7PLUS, please email us at support@alarmgrid.com. This is also a good email to use if you are interested in starting new monitoring service with Alarm Grid. We're here to check your emails from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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We know that 2021 has been a busy year so far. And things are just getting started! We thought we would take a moment to catch our breath and review some recent tidbits, while also giving a preview on some new things coming soon. Here are some miscellaneous bits of news to take in.


Alarm Grid is now offering the Honeywell LTEMXA-TC2 and the LTEMXV-TC2. These are special bundles for Honeywell VISTA users that include a new communicator (LTEM-XA or LTEM-XV) and PROM Chip upgrades for the 15P and for the 20P. These upgrade kits are good if you need a new communicator for your Honeywell VISTA System, as well as PROM Chip upgrade to support Total Connect 2.0. Remember that the minimum PROM Chip Version for a 15P or 20P to support TC2 is 9.12. If you missed our post announcing the new LTEM-XA and LTEM-XV, then make sure to check it out! These modules are truly state-of-the-art with their ability to utilize the LTE Cat M1 Networks from AT&T and Verizon.

By the time this post goes live, there will be roughly 18 days remaining on the countdown timer featured on the mysterious 2GIG Edge Website. We can assume that the 2GIG Edge is indeed set to make its much-anticipated debut in less than three (3) weeks. A new alarm panel from a leading manufacturer is always something to get excited about. We still don't know very much about the 2GIG Edge. But let's just say, we're hoping it lives up to the hype. If you missed our initial post on the upcoming panel, you can take a look here.

We made a couple of new Alarm Grid videos to kick-off 2021. It has been awhile since our video team has been able to resume their usual work in the studio. We hope to have our team back and performing business as usual very soon. But we did manage to make a pair of videos featuring Jorge. For anyone who missed the latest Alarm Grid videos, click here.

There has been some recent activity in the always existing world of smart home automation. The Z-Wave Alliance recently released the specifications for the upcoming Z-Wave Long Range protocol. Z-Wave LR promises to change the game by supporting wireless signal transmissions from distances of "several miles", while also allowing more than 4,000 nodes on a single network and drastically improving battery life. From what we can tell Z-Wave LR will be a subset of the Z-Wave 700-Series that represents the "next generation" after Z-Wave Plus 500-Series. For more on Z-Wave LR, visit our post on the subject.

A new Alarm.com Camera recently hit the market. The Alarm.com ADC-V515 represents a new "entry level" indoor camera option that offers virtually all of the same features and performance of their higher-end cameras, but at a more affordable price. Highlights for the ADC-V515 include its 1080p recording, High Dynamic Range (HDR), 110° viewing angle, ~15 feet IR night vision. and 2.4 GHz WIFI connectivity. You can read our blog about the camera to learn more.

Don't forget that the 3G and CDMA sunset is getting closer every day! Make sure to upgrade to LTE early so that your system does not get left behind. Our sources indicate that AT&T 3G Communicators will stop working after January 31, 2022. And the shutdown date for Verizon CDMA Communicators is December 31, 2022. In preparation, you can no longer activate a 3G or CDMA Communicator for monitoring service. If you want more information regarding the 3G and CDMA sunset, then please check out this detailed post. You may also want to access the Alarm Grid Communicator Replacement Portal if you are actively making an upgrade to a newer LTE Communicator. Remember, an LTE Communicator will extend the lifespan of your security system for many years to come!

We have some final notes regarding a couple of things to look forward to in 2021. First, be on the lookout for the new Qolsys IQ Hub Security System sometime this year. Qolsys hasn't said much on the subject lately, but we're still expecting it at some point. And if you're an IQ Panel 2 Plus user, then make sure to read about IQ2 Firmware Version 2.5.4 if you somehow missed the recent announcement. And if you were an early adopter of Resideo's latest offering, the Honeywell Home PROA7PLUS, then make sure to keep a close lookout for a firmware update that will allow the new panel to support local end user programming. We still don't have an official date from Resideo, but we are very hopeful it will be made available sometime in the next few months. Fingers crossed!

If you have any questions about any of the aforementioned news, or if you are looking to start new monitoring service with Alarm Grid, please email us at support@alarmgrid.com. Our team is here to check your emails and answer your questions from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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If you're like the folks at Alarm Grid, then you're always looking for new and exciting ways that you can use your security system. One novel possibility is to have your system alert you if your pool or hot tub experiences an unusual temperature change. Today, we will explore how to do that.


As you likely know, using temperature sensors with an alarm system to monitor the ambient air temperature inside a building is nothing new. These devices are used to alert the user to a broken HVAC system that could result in them arriving to a very uncomfortable home, or even worse, major damage caused by the water pipes freezing. But if you want to monitor the water temperature of a pool or hot tub, then you have to get a little creative.

It goes without saying that there are several intrinsic challenges associated with setting up your alarm system to monitor the temperature of your pool or hot tub AND being alerted in the event that an unusual temperature change occurs. Basically, you need a waterproof temperature probe, a programmable temperature sensor that is compatible with that probe, AND a way to interface that temperature sensor with your alarm system. Only then will your security system keep you in the loop if your pool or spa heater goes kaput.

While there are certainly many combinations of waterproof temperature probes and programmable temperature sensors that you can use for this job, we will stick to the products that we have available on our site. This starts with the Winland TEMP-L-W Waterproof Temperature Sensor Probe, which can be safely submerged in your pool or hot tub and monitor temperatures ranging from -58°F to 158°F. It's the perfect probe for the job!

You can easily connect the Winland TEMP-L-W Probe with our selected programmable temperature sensor for the job, the Winland EA200 EnviroAlert. The reason why you need a programmable temperature sensor is because you will need to set a very specific range of temperatures to perform this task effectively. It isn't good enough to just have a very vague range of allowable temperatures here. A standard in-building temperature sensor that monitors for a broken HVAC system might be able to get away with that, but it won't do you much good if you hop in your pool and find that it's a chilly 50°F. Realistically, you will probably want to keep your pool within a very specific range, say 70°F to 80°F. And if you own a hot tub, then that range is probably even more restrictive, perhaps 98°F to 102°F. With that in mind, there isn't much room for error here. You need a digital programmable temperature sensor where you can set customizable high-low temperature limits. And as you can probably guess, the temperature sensor will alert your system if the detected water temperature goes outside these defined limits.

Please note that the EA200 only has one output function, so you can only monitor for low temp OR high temp. But only one probe is needed. If you really need to monitor for both low temp AND high temp, then you can get the Winland EA400 EnviroAlert instead, which has two (2) outputs. You can use one for low-temp monitoring alerts, and the other for high-temp monitoring alerts. But keep in mind that if you have both alert types set up, then you will need TWO (2) probes as part of the setup.

One thing to keep in mind though is that these temperature sensors are often not waterproof, so you may want to find some waterproof housing that you can keep the module inside. Remember, just because the probe is waterproof does not mean that its accompanying sensor can withstand the same conditions! The protection doesn't necessarily have to be anything super high-tech either. You may be able to get away with a plastic container with the probe running through a leak-proof fitting. Unfortunately, we don't offer any sort of waterproof contraption on our website, but your local department store can probably help!

Your last challenge is finding a way to interface the temperature sensor, in our case the Winland EA200 EnviroAlert, with your alarm panel. If you're working with a wired sensor like we are, then the standard practice is to connect it to a wired panel or a converter module. But using a complete wired to wireless converter for just one sensor is probably a bit excessive. Instead, you may look into a wireless transmitter. Many wireless door and window contact sensors have on-board terminals that you can use to connect a wired sensor. This will allow the wired sensor to communicate with the panel wirelessly. You will likely need to provide a power supply and backup battery to the equation when doing this with a powered device like a digital programmable temperature sensor, but that's to be expected when powering the device in the first place. You must also make sure the wireless sensor acting as the transmitter is compatible with your system. Some popular options for doing this include the Honeywell 5816 and the DSC PG9945. Remember to check compatibility if you are unsure as to what will work with your alarm system!

From there, it's as simple as enrolling the programmable temperature sensor with your system. You will actually be programming the wireless transmitter using its auxiliary input settings. Check the device manual to see if there's a specific Loop Number or other setting that you need to use. You will also need to configure the high-low temperature limits and the notification settings on the temperature sensor. You are making it so that whenever the detected temperature in your pool or spa goes outside the defined limits, the wired temperature sensor will tell the connected wireless transmitter to alert your system. Once this happens, a fault will occur on the associated zone, and the programmed Response Type will occur. A popular Response Type for this application is 24-Hour Auxiliary, though you will want to make sure the central station knows that this is for a pool or hot tub temperature zone, and not for a medical emergency zone.

If you have any questions about setting up a pool or hot tub temperature zone for your own security system, please reach out to us. We will be happy to help any Alarm Grid monitored customers with finding the right sensors and programming. The best way to reach us is to email support@alarmgrid.com. We're here to provide you with top-notch support and help from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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Alarm.com has a new security camera available, the ADC-V515. This is an entry-level camera for use in homes and small businesses. It supports virtually all of the same great features as the higher-end cameras from Alarm.com. The camera is available for purchase on the Alarm Grid website.


The Alarm.com ADC-V515 is set to replace the existing Alarm.com ADC-V522IR, which will remain available until the existing stock is exhausted. What's great about the new ADC-V515 is that it offers nearly all of the same excellent features and strong performance of earlier Alarm.com Camera models, but at a lower price point. We recommend this camera for anyone looking to set up video monitoring inside their home or business on a budget.

For an entry-level camera, the ADC-V515 certain boasts some impressive specifications. It offers full 1080p recording and High Dynamic Range (HDR) functionality for more luminous video captures. Its viewing angle of 110° is only 7° less than the higher-end ADC-V523. You can also effectively use the ADC-V515 at nighttime or in a dark environment thanks to its IR Night Vision feature, which works from up to 15 feet away. You will also love the ability to adjust images through Flip, Brightness, Contrast, Saturation, Sharpness, and Exposure.

One restriction with the ADC-V515 is that it can only be used with WIFI connectivity. The camera does not support wired ethernet connectivity, and it cannot be set up with Power over Ethernet (PoE). This is important to keep in mind if you are accustomed to wiring your security cameras for PoE. Instead, the ADC-V515 gets its power from a plug-in transformer, which comes included. Additionally, you can only use 2.4 GHz WIFI networks with the camera. It does not support 5 GHz WIFI networks.

Remember that the ADC-V515 is for indoor use only. If you need an outdoor camera, then you might consider the Alarm.com ADC-V723 instead. Also keep in mind that you will need Alarm.com Video Monitoring service to use the ADC-V515 or any other mainline Alarm.com Camera. You can get Alarm.com Video Monitoring service with a Platinum Plan from Alarm Grid. Both our Platinum and Self-Platinum Plans are viable options. Click here to learn more about our monitoring plans.

If you are interested in starting new monitoring service, upgrading your existing service, or if you just want to learn more about the ADC-V515, then please email our support and planner teams at support@alarmgrid.com. We're here to help you from 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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When you move into a new home or office, you may find an existing security system that you're hoping to put to use. Or maybe you have an already monitored alarm panel, and you want to extend its useful lifespan. Alarm Grid is here to help determine the best course of action for your needs.

Alarm grid inside security stickers

Most users with a security system will want to have it monitored. When we refer to alarm monitoring, we are talking about the ability of the system to send out signals in the event of an emergency, such as a break-in or fire. This allows the user to receive automatic dispatch from a trained operator at a central monitoring station. It also makes it possible for the end user to receive text and/or email alerts that notify them of the situation so they can contact help themselves. Whether you go with central station monitoring or self-monitoring is a personal decision. You can learn more about Alarm Grid monitoring plans on this page.

For alarm monitoring to work, you need a security system with a communicator that is installed and activated. If you inherit an old or existing system, then there is a good chance that you can get it monitored by simply replacing its communicator. This isn't always possible, but it can save you money by not having to start from scratch with a brand-new system. And for optimal reliability, we recommend getting the system set up with a cellular communicator, specifically an LTE cellular communicator. This will require a cellular monitoring plan, but it is the best way to ensure that your system stays reliably monitored.

Always power down your panel completely before installing a cellular communicator!

2gig ltev1 a gc3 alarm com verizon lte cellular communicator for

There are many advantages to cellular monitoring. For one, cellular outages are almost unheard of when an adequate cellular signal is obtained. The same cannot be said for internet, as internet outages are relatively common. A power outage won't affect your system's cellular connection, as the communicator will stay running using the panel's backup battery. And since cellular is completely wireless, there's no line for an intruder to "cut" to try and disrupt your system's cellular connection. This is far and away the most consistent and reliable type of communication available for an alarm system.

We also want to stress the importance of getting an LTE cellular communicator. Older cellular networks like AT&T 3G and Verizon CDMA are in the process of being shut down. Cellular communicators that connect with these older networks can no longer be activated. But LTE, which stands for Long-Term Evolution, provides a way to "future-proof" your system so that it can stay monitored for many, many years. Most systems capable of being set up for monitoring service will have some type of LTE option available. Many users with existing systems that are already monitored are simply looking for ways to upgrade their systems to LTE so that they remain connected as older cellular networks are shut down. If you would like to learn more about the 3G/CDMA sunset, we encourage you to check out this post.

Honeywell lyriclte v verizon lte cellular communicator for the l

Today, we're going to take a look at many of the popular alarm systems and explain which communicators you can use to get them set up with LTE. Just be aware that many panels will require you to know the system's Installer Code (IC) so that you can enter programming. This is an important step for setting up your system and getting it monitored. Simply find your panel in the table below, and review the relevant information.

Keep in mind that only communicators currently sold by Alarm Grid are listed. There may be other, discontinued alarm systems that we don't mention. And if you're having trouble identifying your panel, you can always reach out to us by emailing support@alarmgrid.com for assistance.

Note: In the chart below, IC is used to indicate the Installer Code:

Alarm Panel
LTE Communicators
Notes
Honeywell LYNX Touch L5000 & L5100
Honeywell lynxtouch l5100 lynx touch wireless alarm control panel
None Available. Default IC is 4112. Can backdoor into programming if needed.

Cannot upgrade to LTE. Replace w/ Honeywell Lyric Controller or 345 MHz Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus.

Both L5000 and L5100 are discontinued.
Honeywell LYNX Touch L5200, L5210, L7000
Honeywell l5210 lynx touch wireless security system with 4 1 sla
Honeywell l7000 wireless home security system with 7 inch screen
Honeywell LTE-L57A (AT&T LTE)

Honeywell LTE-L57V (Verizon LTE)
Default IC is 4112. Can backdoor into programming if needed.

May need to purchase Honeywell LYNXTOUCH-MSD Firmware Updater Tool to upgrade system firmware.

Alarm Grid offers upgrade kits that include both an LTE communicator and the updater tool.

LTE-L57A requires 9.00.209.
AT&T LTE Upgrade Kit

LTE-L57V requires 9.00.201.
Verizon LTE Upgrade Kit

L5200 has been discontinued.
Honeywell Lyric Controller
Honeywell lyric controller encrypted wireless security system
Honeywell LYRICLTE-A (AT&T LTE)

Honeywell LYRICLTE-V (Verizon LTE)
Must have IC for programming. Default IC is 4112.

Firmware update may be required. This can be done over WIFI using the panel's built-in WIFI card before adding the LTE communicator.

Alarm Grid can activate the system on WIFI first so that the update can be applied, and then a cellular communicator can be added after.
Honeywell LYNX Plus L3000
Honeywell l3000 wireless alarm control panel
Honeywell LTE-L3A (AT&T LTE)

Honeywell LTE-L3V (Verizon LTE)
Default IC is 4112. Can backdoor into programming if needed.

All firmware versions of the L3000 support the LTE communicators. However, you need Firmware Version 20.1 or higher to use the system with Total Connect 2.0.
Honeywell, VISTA-10P VISTA-15P, VISTA-20P, and VISTA-21iP
Honeywell vista 10p alarm control panel
Honeywell vista 15p alarm control panel
Honeywell vista 20p wired alarm control panel

Honeywell vista 21ip internet alarm control panel open
Honeywell LTE-IA (AT&T LTE & IP)

Honeywell LTE-IV (AT&T LTE & IP)

Honeywell LTE-XA (AT&T LTE)

Honeywell LTE-XV (Verizon LTE)

Honeywell LTEM-XA (AT&T LTE Cat M1)

Honeywell LTEM-XV (Verizon LTE Cat M1)

Alarm.com ADC-SEM210-VT-AT (AT&T LTE & IP)

Alarm.com ADC-SEM210-VT-VZ (Verizon LTE & IP)
Default IC is 4112. Can backdoor into programming if needed.

The VISTA-10P cannot be used with Total Connect 2.0. An Alarm.com System Enhancement Module (SEM) is recommended if you want to use your VISTA-10P with an interactive platform.

The VISTA-15P and 20P require Firmware Version 9.12 or higher to use Total Connect 2.0. PROM Chip upgrades can be purchased from Alarm Grid. The 15P is here, and the 20P is here.

We also sell bundled kits that include both a communicator and PROM Chip upgrades.
LTEIA-TC2
LTEIV-TC2
LTEXA-TC2
LTE-XV-TC2

Adding an external communicator to a VISTA-21iP will require disabling the system's internal IP communicator.

A VISTA-21iP must be running Firmware Version 3.13 or higher to use Total Connect 2.0. PROM Chip upgrades for the 21iP are here.

VISTA-10P has been discontinued.
Honeywell VISTA-128BPT & VISTA-250BPT
Honeywell vista 128bpt pcb commercial alarm control panel
Honeywell LTE-IA (AT&T LTE & IP)

Honeywell LTE-IV (AT&T LTE & IP)

Honeywell LTE-XA (AT&T LTE)

Honeywell LTE-XV (Verizon LTE)
Must have IC for programming. Default IC is 4140.

All versions of the 128BPT can use Total Connect 2.0.

For the 250BPT, Firmware Version 10.3 or higher is required for TC2.
2GIG Go!Control GC2
2gig cp21 345 front
2GIG LTEA-A-GC2 (AT&T LTE)

2GIG LTEV1-A-GC2 (Verizon LTE)
Must have IC for programming. Default IC is 1561.

LTEA-A-GC2 requires FW 1.19.3 or higher.

LTEV1-A-GC2 requires FW 1.19 or higher.

FW updates are made via Updater Cable or Easy Updater Tool.

GC2 has been discontinued.
2GIG GC3
2gig gc3 diy wireless security system w slash 7 screen
2GIG LTEA-A-GC3 (AT&T LTE)

2GIG LTEV1-A-GC3 (Verizon LTE)
Must have IC for programming. Default IC is 1561.

LTEA-A-GC3 requires FW 3.2.3 or higher.

LTEV1-A-GC3 requires FW 3.1.3 or higher.

GC3 has been discontinued.
Interlogix/GE Simon XT, XTi, or XTi-5
Interlogix simon xt
Alarm.com XT-511-US-DP-AT (AT&T LTE & IP)

Alarm.com XT-511-US-DP-VZ (Verizon LTE & IP)

Alarm.com XT-511-US-AT (AT&T LTE)

Alarm.com XT-511-US-VZ (Verizon LTE)
Must have IC for programming. Default IC is 4321.

Simon XT must be running FW Version 1.3 or higher. Make sure to check the firmware first.

Simon XTi and XTi-5 do not have this requirement and can support any of the listed communicators.

Consider upgrading to a newer panel.
Interlogix/CADDX NetworX NX-4V2, NX-6V2, NX-8V2, NX-8E

Alarm.com NX-411-US-AT (AT&T LTE & IP)

Alarm.com NX-410-US-VZ (Verizon LTE & IP)

Interlogix NetworX NX-592E-LTE-ZX-VZ (Verizon LTE)
Must have IC for programming. Default IC is 4321.

Consider upgrading to a newer panel.
Interlogix/GE Concord 4

Alarm.com CD-411-US-AT (AT&T LTE & IP)

Alarm.com CD-421-US-VZ (Verizon LTE & IP)
Must have IC for programming. Default IC is 4321.

Consider upgrading to a newer panel.
DSC Impassa
Dsc scw457aatnt front open
DSC TL8055LTVZ (Verizon LTE & IP) Must have IC for programming. Default IC is 5555.

Requires FW 1.3 or higher.

Consider upgrading to a newer panel.
DSC PowerSeries PC1616, PC1832, PC1864

ADC-SEM210-PS-AT (AT&T LTE & IP)

ADC-SEM210-PS-VZ (Verizon LTE & IP)
Must have IC for programming. Default IC is 5555.

Consider upgrading to a newer panel.
DSC PowerSeries NEO HS2016, HS2032, HS2064, HS2128

DSC TL880LEAT N (AT&T LTE & IP)

DSC TL880LTVZ N (Verizon LTE & IP)
Must have IC for programming. Default IC is 5555.
Qolsys IQ Panel and DSC Touch
Qolsys iq panel at and t 7 security panel w slash z wave att cel
None Available. Default IC for IQ Panel is 1111.

Default IC for DSC Touch is 5555.

You cannot swap-out the communicator for a Qolsys IQ Panel or DSC Touch. You must replace the panel to upgrade to LTE.

The recommended replacement option for the Qolsys IQ Panel is the 319.5 MHz Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus.

The recommended replacement option for the DSC Touch is the 433 MHz Qolsys IQ Panel 2 Plus.

My panel isn't listed!

If your panel isn't listed in the table above, then all hope isn't lost quite yet. Nearly any hardwired alarm panel with a phone dialer can use a device called a Telguard TG-1 Express to connect with an LTE cellular network. The TG-1 Express will take over your system's dialer and convert the phone line signal into a cellular signal. This is a great option that works in many situations. Just be aware that you may still need to be able to access system programming using the Installer Code to configure some settings. This can be easier said than done, and many users simply elect to upgrade to a newer wireless panel. But if you are familiar and experienced with the panel you are using and you can handle the programming, then you can leave the monitoring to us. The Telguard TG-1 Express is available in an AT&T LTE model and a Verizon LTE model.

Telguard tg 1 express verizon lte universal cellular communicato

If you decide that upgrading your existing system to LTE is the way to go, then Alarm Grid is happy to help you! We recommend checking out the Alarm Grid Communicator Replacement Portal to get started. You can choose a time for an activator to help you get your new LTE communicator up and running. Just make sure to have your new LTE communicator installed before your scheduled appointment. Click here for our Communicator Replacement Portal.

We've also got your back if you decide to upgrade to a new system. To get started, simply reach out to us via email at support@alarmgrid.com or by calling us at (888) 818-7728 during our business hours of 9am to 8pm ET M-F. We look forward to hearing from you!

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